View Full Version : How do I change a tire??


PowerDubs
08-07-2011, 08:14 PM
Literally.. how do I change a tire?

Over the years I've been building my collection of tools, and like many of you, I take a satisfaction in being able to do many things myself instead of paying a dealer or shop.

There are a few larger cost items that I have always known I wanted to have eventually. I have a compressor, a welder, a lift, so after having the local tire shop charge me $137 to mount and balance 4 tires last month..I decided never again!! I started looking in craigslist for a reasonably priced, small foot print, 110v tire changer.

Long story short.. I bought one, but have no clue whatsoever how to use it. I tried looking online for any info regarding the model but turned up zilch.

Can anyone give me a walk through on how to use it? I've got an old tire and wheel I can practice with.

Hopefully tomorrow, my friend is picking up a Coats 650 wheel balancer for me as well. No idea how to use that either. :)

Thanks!! :thumbup:

Brand- Corghi Artiglio
Model- A 2001 TI Tire Machine



http://images.craigslist.org/3n13m63l85V25W35S1b7v983425d8ad261505.jpg
http://images.craigslist.org/3k53m13pf5W35P65S5b7v3decdb57196e1a2b.jpg
http://images.craigslist.org/3n93mb3p05O15Z55W6b7va3c8d6f4ea041e7d.jpg

tw33k2514
08-07-2011, 08:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQwDK3_Hrio

Best video I can find. Once you have done one, the same principles apply to all tires.

spoolgarage
08-07-2011, 08:24 PM
1. Remove tire valve
2. Break bead on tire with side bead breaker on machine. BE CAREFUL
3. mount rim on clamps by pressing the lever that spreads the clamps.
4. Bring down the arm onto the rim
5. Use the arm to leverage up the tire over the lip on the arm with a tire iron.
6. Press lever that spins tire holding the iron steady.
7. Tire pops up re position tire to get the other side out.
8. Tire is out
9. lube new tire
10. Hard to explain but use the arm to wedge the tire onto the rim.
11. spin rim
12. repeat
13. blast air into it. IT WILL POP WATCH YOUR FINGERS
14. Reinstall valve
15. Inflate

jayoldschool
08-07-2011, 08:25 PM
This should help:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQwDK3_Hrio

greasemonkey44
08-07-2011, 08:36 PM
1. Remove tire valve
2. Break bead on tire with side bead breaker on machine. BE CAREFUL
3. mount rim on clamps by pressing the lever that spreads the clamps.
4. Bring down the arm onto the rim
5. Use the arm to leverage up the tire over the lip on the arm with a tire iron.
6. Press lever that spins tire holding the iron steady.
7. Tire pops up re position tire to get the other side out.
8. Tire is out
9. lube new tire
10. Hard to explain but use the arm to wedge the tire onto the rim.
11. spin rim
12. repeat
13. blast air into it. IT WILL POP WATCH YOUR FINGERS
14. Reinstall valve
15. Inflate

tehee fogot to lube it you wrecked the bead on the car tire
id ask at the local tire shop or your local mechanic; you will also need a balancer and the skills to use it. but the most important thing is learning how to do change a tire quickly and safely and for me thats from another person.
there are just too many steps and warnings to do it online; you need to see how far to set out the duck bill. You have to see how a tire is balanced and how to pop a bead that wont seat.
good luck and i wish i had one at home

tatra
08-07-2011, 09:01 PM
get a part time job at walmart and have them pay you to learn............and buy some of this............

http://www.freylube.com/

years of tire experience and this stuff is great..............never failed me yet..........

Scout Driver
08-07-2011, 09:04 PM
If you have the option to do so, have an experienced person teach you. They will be be able to show you tips and drill the safety aspect for you. You will probably learn more from an old tire person in 10 minutes than you will from any other source.

Scott

p_mori7
08-07-2011, 09:18 PM
Any tires you dismount then remount will need to be balanced too.

tcsalvage
08-07-2011, 09:26 PM
i don't know if the 650 uses a master weight or not but if it does make sure you get it. without it you cannot reset your balancer and it will be useless. also you will need the manual to reset the balancer but it should be available online. if anyone else uses your balancer make sure they know not to use the master weight or just paint it orange so you can spot it. the changers pretty easy once you see how its done

skang
08-07-2011, 09:59 PM
To be honest, I recommend you learn face-face from who are well experienced. It can be very dangerous.

Ones you do 2-3 tires, it gets pretty easy. And there tricks to make life so much easier.

Good luck!!

davesnothere
08-07-2011, 10:08 PM
1. Remove tire valve
2. Break bead on tire with side bead breaker on machine. BE CAREFUL
3. mount rim on clamps by pressing the lever that spreads the clamps.
4. Bring down the arm onto the rim
5. Use the arm to leverage up the tire over the lip on the arm with a tire iron.
6. Press lever that spins tire holding the iron steady.
7. Tire pops up re position tire to get the other side out.
8. Tire is out
9. lube new tire
10. Hard to explain but use the arm to wedge the tire onto the rim.
11. spin rim
12. repeat
13. blast air into it. IT WILL POP WATCH YOUR FINGERS
14. Reinstall valve
15. Inflate

Pretty much this.
But ALWAYS use a new valve stem.
For as cheap as they are, it would be ridiculous not to.

Danglerb
08-08-2011, 02:38 AM
Any tires you dismount then remount will need to be balanced too.

Mark the tire at the valve stem, depending on what your are doing to it, like putting in a patch, balance can be fine.

Tire machine is a brute force device, and serious injury is very possible. Its not a toy you can mess with until you get the hang of it.

Its not yet on the list of things in my friends shop I am allowed to mess with, and the lathe is, so figure from that.

GeorgiaHybrid
08-08-2011, 10:33 AM
Pretty much this.
But ALWAYS use a new valve stem.
For as cheap as they are, it would be ridiculous not to.

Depends on the TPMS sensor on new cars......

Older cars, go ahead and replace the valve stem.

back2class
08-08-2011, 11:08 AM
I've though about buying one, but when Walmart charges $5 to mount and $5 to balance, it is hard to justify. I do own a manual tire mounting unit that I have used a few times for trailer tires as shops do not want to mount the baldies I use on trailers sometimes. But without a balancer....I just take car tires and most trailer tires now to the local tire guy. He charges $14 to mount and balance.

Obie
08-08-2011, 12:29 PM
Am I the only one that was kinda chuckling when clicking this thread, expecting it to be about literally changing a tire? Nice score though, would certainly pay for itself over the long haul if you do any off-roading without a dedicated wheel/tire setup.

89GLH
08-08-2011, 12:47 PM
Ive worked at several tire places and it's amazing how many people are 'trained' and have no idea how to use em. Once you get good with them though, you'll be shocked to see how much time you save. Buddy and I could do 4 new dismount/mount/balance in about 20 minutes if we were rocking and rolling. Very easy work, just wish it paid more...

Word of advice, if you forget to lube the bead up properly and it tears, DO NOT mount the tire anyway. Had an F350 tire blow up in my face when the asshole that started the job ripped the bead (during the mounting process) and mounted it anyway. Got about 60lbs in it when it let go, blew the glasses off my face and the machine mounting bolts about 1" out of the shop floor (tire was in the chuck). Quick way to earn yourself a trip to the ENT specialist.

PowerDubs
08-11-2011, 10:12 PM
Ok..plugged it in, hooked up the air line and threw on an old wheel I had lying around.

It came off quite easy really, although I am sure there is a difference between an old tire with some sidewall on a steel wheel VS a low profile tire on an aluminum wheel.

I'd probably still get it off, but the aluminum/paint would pay the price. :)

I haven't tried to put it back on yet. Do I *need* to buy the commercial lube crap, or can I just use some soapy water?? I mean, what did they use 25-30+ years ago?

Also..on the turn table there are 4 nipples that shoot air when I push one of the pedals. What are they for?

I should have bought one of these years ago.. :thumbup:

http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u26/powerdubs/IMG_0380.jpg
http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u26/powerdubs/IMG_0381.jpg

Olafur
08-11-2011, 10:29 PM
Also..on the turn table there are 4 nipples that shoot air when I push one of the pedals. What are they for?

I do not know this particular machine but they are probably intended to shoot air into the tire when you are seating the beads.

PS: I would buy a small bucket of "the commercial lube crap" it will last for many years if stored properly and, at least some of it, works as a sealant.

mtkst19
08-11-2011, 11:44 PM
i have tire lube. but in a pinch i have used windex or anything wet/slick that is not oil based to spin a tire on. the first inner bead usually you can get on almost by hand. it is the top bead where the lube helps.


the air burst is what you use to help seat the bead. when you seat tires try not to go to extreme on psi. on stiff sidewall tires like found on road race slicks i have had my ass pucker a few times trying to get a bead to seat. lets just say i had to manually add air instead of using the machine's limited air chuck. as the machine will cut off at 60 psi.

when you balance a wheel-- clean the inner barrel before mounting it up to spin. this is so you can stick the wheel weights on easier assuming you are using stick on weights. To keep stick on weights ON the rim, i will use chrome metal duct tape like used on air ducts to seal joints. just cut the tape little wider than the weight area and slap it over.

nice rims you dont want to mess up--chuck them up liek you did in your picture from outside in. junk wheels or steelies you dont care about, i will clamp them so claws grab from inside.

if you dont want to scratch the face or atleast limit the chance to-- use the tire spoon to get teh tire over the duck bill of the machine then remove the spoon beforevyou hit the peddle to spin the turntable. i find once i have the spoon in and rolled over to lift the tire--if i bump the peddle to back the machine up it allows me to remove the spoon without marking. then peddle down and spin the tire off as designed.

hope some of this helps ya.

arizonaadam
08-11-2011, 11:54 PM
Now do it 50 more times! Thats how Discount trained me. Nice machine. However, I was actually thinking just the other day that this is the one job I wouldn't bother with.

rlitman
08-12-2011, 09:32 AM
. . . I was actually thinking just the other day that this is the one job I wouldn't bother with.

I've got an SO balancer, and am so happy to have it. I'd have one of these, but don't have the space.

PowerDubs
08-12-2011, 04:55 PM
This doesn't really take up THAT much space. I have a normal 2 car garage, and this just sits against the wall in front. I can still get my cars in.

Of course, I make sure all the stuff I keep in the garage is related to the car / work I do in there.. so no more lawnmower, snowblower, wheel barrow, ETC.. I bought a shed and stuck all that stuff in there.

To the guy that said it is one job he wouldn't bother.. I don't want to have to jump through hoops to get to a tire place during their business hours (or my weekend) and pay through the ass for something I can do myself when it is 10 oclock at night, in my own damn garage with a beer in my hand!

Besides, I got what I consider to be a smoking deal on this- $750.. and for example, the set of tires I just bought for one of my cars I bought online, paying about $160 less for the set than the local tire place would have cost me even after paying shipping. Had I had this machine then (and the balancer I bought for $549) I wouldn't have had to pay the $137 for mount and balance.. so just on 1 set of tires I would have saved almost $300.

So I paid $1300 for the 2 machines.. even if I saved half of the above numbers, I'd make it back in 8-9 tire changes. (I own 4 cars and drive a lot each day for my work)

Hell, even if I only ever did 4 tire changes, at that savings I could sell the machines quickly for 50% of what I paid for them and still break even. No brainer.

I'm pretty sure, just like the lift..these will also see plenty of use for family and friends.


On a funny note, I found a Corghi service manual PDF online..check out this guy changing a tire in a suit. Hahaha.. figures.. it is an Italian made changer.



http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u26/powerdubs/IMG_0382.jpg

theoldwizard1
08-12-2011, 05:59 PM
I LUST for a No Mar Scratch Proof (http://www.nomartirechanger.com/) tire changer !

With a (unknown tire and rim) seated, locked down and the bead "broken" this video (http://www.nomartirechanger.com/videos/1) shows both sidewall being removed and re-installed in 21 seconds !

Okay, this is a more realistic video (http://www.nomartirechanger.com/videos/14). Less than 2 minutes to break the bead and remove the tire. About 1 minutes to re-install.

Coming from the "old school" where I did a lot of tire dismounts/remount by hand, I sure wish we had that magic paste and tire lube 40+ years ago ! I got some good biceps doing it all "the hard way" !

fatfillup
08-12-2011, 09:31 PM
Congrats on your purchases. At $35 a tire to mount and balance, I'd have to think about doing it myself also. Were they low profile tires? Otherwise, I would avoid that shop at all costs. I have often thought about buying machines myself but at my shop, I have 3 neighbors who will do it for me cheaply, so I won't bother now.

Lube is critical, but I would think anything slick would work just fine, but as someone stated, tire lube is cheap and has a long shelf life so buy the good stuff.

The low profile tires is where the challenge is so I would get comfy on 75 series tires first and work your way down to the 50 series.

I also wouldn't hesitate to do some for profit once I got good at it. I busted 100's of tires in the mid 70's while I was going to college on an old Coates 10-10 tire machine. Course no mag wheels and low profiles hardly existed then, so its a different ball game now.

Enjoy your machines!!

Boiler
08-12-2011, 09:58 PM
The tire shop I use I also use for my winter oil changes & transmission flushes. I change to winter tires there too. They rotate & balance for free if they sold the tires. They remount them from me for $5 per tire when I change to my snows (yeah I know, buy a second set of rims...) and they didn't overcharge on the tires in the first place, in fact they matched my prices I found online for the tires AND the rims, mounted and balanced and put on my Jeep.

And I go there for anything I don't want to do myself on my vehicles because they're good, fast, and treat you right.

PowerDubs
08-18-2011, 08:02 PM
Got a chance tonight to play with it a little more. I put the tire back on that I took off last time.

I'm glad I found the owners manual PDF online for it as it taught me 2 things-

#1, I never knew it had reverse. I just stepped down.. never thought of lifting up on the pedal.

#2, Before I read the manual, when I tried to put the tire on, it would go 2/3 of the way on then bind. The manual showed me how pushing the part of the tire that is closer to me inwards on the wheel will give it enough 'slack' on the other side to go on.

BTW- I sprayed it with windex as someone above mentioned and it worked like a charm.


SOOO.. that brings us to the last part before I start playing with the tire balancer to figure out how it works.. I can't get the bead to seat.

I have the valve core out, and hooked up the air line off the machine to the stem. I then hit the pedal that sends air through the hose into the stem as well as operates the 4 bead blast nozzles. The tire seems to get some pressure in it..(I squeeze it with my hand) but that's it.. doesn't seem to have enough pressure to POP.

My compressor is a '5.5hp' ;) 110v Sears 30 gallon. Is that not enough? The changer has it's own air tank on the back as well.

Any tricks?

PowerDubs
08-19-2011, 04:27 PM
Nobody??

Olafur
08-19-2011, 05:00 PM
Nobody??
Usually the hard part is to get the beads to seal, but it seems you have already done that. Just need more pressure to get them to seat fully. Perhaps there is a pressure regulator on the hose from the machine set at low pressure (25 psi!?). Not enough to seat the bead. Also if the 4 nozzles are blowing while you are trying to inflate the tire you are loosing lot of pressure there. They should only give short burst while you get the bead to seal and then be turned off.

Direct line from your compressor would do the trick. Even tiny portable 12v compressor can seat beds IF you mange to get them to seal in the first place...

theoldwizard1
08-19-2011, 05:36 PM
I have the valve core out, and hooked up the air line off the machine to the stem. I then hit the pedal that sends air through the hose into the stem as well as operates the 4 bead blast nozzles. The tire seems to get some pressure in it..(I squeeze it with my hand) but that's it.. doesn't seem to have enough pressure to POP.
As long as the bead has started to seat on both top and bottom (i.e. no air is leaking out around the top or bottom rim), just keep adding air. I might take over 50 psi to get the bead to fully seat on top and botoom.

My compressor is a '5.5hp' ;) 110v Sears 30 gallon. Is that not enough? The changer has it's own air tank on the back as well.
Volume (SCFM) is not an issue once the top and bottom bead have started the seating process.

theoldwizard1
08-19-2011, 06:00 PM
Lube is critical, but I would think anything slick would work just fine, but as someone stated, tire lube is cheap and has a long shelf life so buy the good stuff.

No Mar Tire Lube Paste (http://www.nomar-secure.com/product_p/sp-lube-paste.htm)

A small amount placed on the proper area of the tire bead and rim bead flange and the tire comes off or go back on with easy ! It can be diluted with water and placed in a spray bottle.

You absolutely need this stuff if you are doing low profile (< 60 series) tires.

Before I read the manual, when I tried to put the tire on, it would go 2/3 of the way on then bind. The manual showed me how pushing the part of the tire that is closer to me inwards on the wheel will give it enough 'slack' on the other side to go on.
You are pushing the bead into the "relief" area which, as you stated, prevents the opposite side from binding. Sometimes you can get away without doing this, but not always. Lube also helps a lot.

If you live anywhere where they use salt on the roads in winter, you will have corrosion problems between the rim flange and the tire bead. Steel rims are easily cleaned with a wire brush (either hand or drill mounted). Painting the area with a rust resistant paint and letting dry over night will prevent the rust from coming back (all though no tire shops that I know of bother painting the rim).

As for corroded aluminum, a stainless steel hand brush works, but I am not certain if it is the best tool for the job. All OEM aluminum wheels have some type of clear coating. This wears off on the rim flange after a few unmount/remount.

I don't have any good recommendations on what kind of coating to use to help sealing and stop corrosion on aluminum wheels.

theoldwizard1
08-19-2011, 06:08 PM
My worst experience unmounting/mounting tires was when I was the "pit crew" for a friend at the local circle track. The tire machine was completely manual. It was mounted to a 4'x4' piece of 3/4" plywood that you stood on while prying the bead off using the center post for leverage.

The problem was, there was so much offset in the rims, I had to "break" the bead on one side, unclamp it from the machine, flip it over to do the opposite side. Of course it was 90+F and I was in the middle of a gravel parking lot.

After 4 of those, I thought I was going to die !

PowerDubs
08-20-2011, 05:20 PM
So my dumb ass went back and read the PDF file again..

The pedal for the air is also 2 position. All the way down is the bead blast.. halfway down is the air line.

I haven't gone back and tried to play with it again yet.. but my mistake is apparent.

RTFM. :thumbup:

paddyboy
09-01-2011, 11:33 PM
I have this 1948ish Coates Iron Tire Man...the first popular tire machine. Before this they did it by hand on the floor. And they were good and fast doing it that way.

I sunk 4 drop in anchors in the garage floor and bolt it down when I need it and unbolt it and set it aside when not in use.

Great investment considering what shops charge for a simple dismount or mount.

Mine
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v20/psatchwill/Coates%20Iron%20Tireman/CoatesIronTireman_1.jpg

From Ebay
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v20/psatchwill/Coates%20Iron%20Tireman/CoatesIronTireman_2-1.jpg