View Full Version : New to me vintage scroll saw -


SweetD
10-29-2011, 12:00 AM
Not sure if anyone is interested in this, but I have been looking for a vintage scroll saw for awhile (or at least thinking about looking for one), and I finally pulled the trigger.

This is a Sears-Roebuck Dunlap Model # 103.0407 from the 1940s, made by King Seeley Mfg. It's an 18" throat depth -

I purchased it here in RI from an older gentleman who told me that it was his father's saw originally. His father had passed about 5 years ago, and he is downsizing some of his stuff.

The cool thing is that the saw works perfectly, and has a great vintage Westinghouse electric motor, and a custom made table (by his father, signed underneath the table 1986).

I think I will simply clean it and lube it. The paint is original save for where someone painted the arm a sloppy red at some point.

http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t167/sweetd8943/2011%20MISC/DSCF6258.jpg

http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t167/sweetd8943/2011%20MISC/DSCF6257.jpg

http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t167/sweetd8943/2011%20MISC/DSCF6260.jpg

Anyone else sporting a cool old scroll saw?

Dave

Shipfittin
10-29-2011, 01:06 AM
That's a fantastic find, I love it's look. I'm sure it will come in handy around the shop. I'd love to have one myself.

hotrodjeep
10-29-2011, 09:16 AM
Bought one just like it a few weeks ago at an auction, sans motor.
No one but me bid, Good thing I started at $1.00.

Jeff

eric_koski
10-29-2011, 10:20 PM
I`ve got its brother.... i`ve also got a manual if u need it

dilbert2000
03-27-2012, 08:26 PM
I just bought one of these with a nice stand - but it's grey rather than blue. Mine also doesn't have a cap on the oil cup, any ideas about this? I'm new here - saw the other postings on this saw. I've been looking at buying one of these for some time, I've used cheaper new scroll saws and all have the same problem you find on any cheap one - too much vibration to be useful. These seem to be solid enough to work well.

Gort the giant robot
03-27-2012, 08:49 PM
That must have been a good design. I have seen hundreds on CL the past couple of years. Many different names, but by the same orig maker. I also own one. I gave $35.00 for mine about 3 years ago.

Gort.

flashman
10-28-2012, 02:48 PM
I know I am reviving this thread but there is a great looking saw available to me locally. He is asking 120 obo and I am sure that is fine for the quality and condition. Any suggestions from those of you who do any scrolling? I am mainly looking just for my boys cub scouts and pine wood derby. Eventually I may try Christmas ornaments.

http://wichita.craigslist.org/tls/3353692994.html

Glacial_Speed
10-28-2012, 09:51 PM
Flashman, the older scroll saws like the one you have listed are a bit different than the saws used in modern scroll sawing and intarsia.

Older machines tend to use 6 inch blades and are much like the blade on a coping saw. More of a stationary jig saw.

Newer machines (RBI, Dewalt 788, Hegner, eclipse, excaliber, etc) use 5 inch blades and the blades are quite thin, they look more like a guitar string with teeth (good vision or magnifying glass required :eyecrazy:). This allows them to turn very tight corners no older machine could match. The new blades also break quite often so the blade holders are designed to be easier to change. The quick blade release also makes inside cuts (where you have to unhook one end of the blade, place the blade through a drilled hole in the workpiece and re-attach) easier to perform. Foot controls, variable speed are also options not easily available on older machines.

$120 seems high.......but if time is more valuable than money and you don't feel like doing the craigslist hunt, I'm sure this would be able to complete a pinewood derby car and a few projects. I don't think ornaments would be an easy task (or even possible) for that older machine.

flashman
10-28-2012, 10:29 PM
Flashman, the older scroll saws like the one you have listed are a bit different than the saws used in modern scroll sawing and intarsia.

Older machines tend to use 6 inch blades and are much like the blade on a coping saw. More of a stationary jig saw.

Newer machines (RBI, Dewalt 788, Hegner, eclipse, excaliber, etc) use 5 inch blades and the blades are quite thin, they look more like a guitar string with teeth (good vision or magnifying glass required :eyecrazy:). This allows them to turn very tight corners no older machine could match. The new blades also break quite often so the blade holders are designed to be easier to change. The quick blade release also makes inside cuts (where you have to unhook one end of the blade, place the blade through a drilled hole in the workpiece and re-attach) easier to perform. Foot controls, variable speed are also options not easily available on older machines.

$120 seems high.......but if time is more valuable than money and you don't feel like doing the craigslist hunt, I'm sure this would be able to complete a pinewood derby car and a few projects. I don't think ornaments would be an easy task (or even possible) for that older machine.

Thanks for the insight. Guess I will keep looking for something a little more to my use. Would have been a cool piece but not worth my money.

Sent from my XT912 using Tapatalk 2

Super Sport
10-28-2012, 10:41 PM
I paid $50 for a similar Craftsman branded one flashman. I thought it was a good deal for the condition, but I wouldn't pay $100 for one. They are relatively common, and old tools like that can be had for good prices at estate sales and such.

acdeucey
10-28-2012, 11:39 PM
Flashman, I have a Delta variable-speed 18" Scroll Saw I purchase around 1985. It's one of the "newer" machines like Glacial_Speed described. I have used the older Craftsman-style saws and they don't even come close to my Delta for cutting precision and the ability to do fine, intricate work.

Like Glacial_Speed wrote, the blades are really fine. So fine that the only way you can tell which way the teeth are oriented is by feel. Being so fine the blades cut incredibly smooth. In fact, the cuts are smooth as glass.

Also, with a metal blade, my Delta is very handy for cutting intricate designs in thin stock.

If I were in the market for a good scroll saw I would not buy one of the older machines. In fact, I'd buy one like this...

http://madison.craigslist.org/tls/3338671345.html

While $400 might seem like a lot of money, Hegner is top-notch. A new model like this costs well over $1000.

Good luck with your search.

Don

flashman
10-29-2012, 02:28 PM
Flashman, I have a Delta variable-speed 18" Scroll Saw I purchase around 1985. It's one of the "newer" machines like Glacial_Speed described. I have used the older Craftsman-style saws and they don't even come close to my Delta for cutting precision and the ability to do fine, intricate work.

Like Glacial_Speed wrote, the blades are really fine. So fine that the only way you can tell which way the teeth are oriented is by feel. Being so fine the blades cut incredibly smooth. In fact, the cuts are smooth as glass.

Also, with a metal blade, my Delta is very handy for cutting intricate designs in thin stock.

If I were in the market for a good scroll saw I would not buy one of the older machines. In fact, I'd buy one like this...

http://madison.craigslist.org/tls/3338671345.html

While $400 might seem like a lot of money, Hegner is top-notch. A new model like this costs well over $1000.

Good luck with your search.

Don

Thanks for your info. There are several Delta saws for sale. Just hard to get info on them. I read about hegner and they don't seem to have a used following in Kansas. I'll probably look at one of the used Deltas.

Sent from my XT912 using Tapatalk 2

Packard V8
10-29-2012, 05:39 PM
The old Walker-Turner 24" scroll saw I've got is the most overbuilt casting I've ever seen on a machine. It could serve as a stamping press. This isn't mine, but same-same.

http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/images/8522-A.jpg

jack vines