View Full Version : Barrel Stove Kits


imported_banzaitoyota
10-28-2005, 06:30 AM
Does anyone have any experience (Good Bad or indifferent) to the 55 Gal Drum stove kit sold by Northern Tools and Made by http://www.vogelzang.com/barrel_stoves.htm

trovato
10-28-2005, 06:42 AM
My father-in-law had one of the double barrel style in his basement many years ago. It put out so much heat you would have to work in shorts. The only real negatives are things that apply to pretty much all wood stoves. Cutting wood, smoke, etc.

JasonK
10-28-2005, 07:41 AM
Barrel stove are extremely dangerous. The also work extremely well......

trovato
10-28-2005, 09:03 AM
Barrel stove are extremely dangerous. The also work extremely well......

Could you expand on that? What is so dangerous about them, that wouldn't be true of any wood burning stove?

JasonK
10-28-2005, 11:29 AM
Please don't tear me up on this guys..... My brother had a double barrel stove in his shop. The barrels are way too thin, On too many occasions we had the bottom barrel glowing red hot. What happens when you heat something up too much? The metal becomes weak. I would not advise it, I'm a cheap bastard, but, I waited and picked up a nice wood stove for my garage.

trovato
10-28-2005, 11:55 AM
Tear you up? Nice guys like us? Of course not. When using the stove you don't HAVE to build a humongous fire inside. And you can regulate the air intake to slow things down a bit. In any event, I'd be interested in hearing if there are any reports of any real problems caused by weakening of overheated metal. For my garage, I use a vented propane heater. The hassles of wood combined with the smoke and smell were just not things I wanted to deal with. My garage is part of my house.

imported_banzaitoyota
10-28-2005, 12:11 PM
Just a question? Did you line the bottom of the stove, as stated in the directions?

JasonK
10-28-2005, 03:48 PM
ya, his stove had the bricks installed. barrel stoves have been around for years, you'll probably be okay as long as you stay away from hedge and woods that burn so freakin hot. If you build one just be careful!

imported_banzaitoyota
11-05-2005, 08:50 PM
ok, built the bottom half today. Used black fireplace joint sealant(Thanks for the tip and not charging me $9.99 to find out), I fired the unit up outside tonight to burn off the barrel paint; then I will paint with stove black.
Tommorow will install the top barrel, move into the shop, add sand and firebrick

Will be making the grates out of some rebar

Pics tommorow

ringer
11-05-2005, 08:56 PM
Make sure you use the carbon fiber style flue. The decreaeed friction on the air molecules when open, increases heat efficiency by 5000%. :)

imported_banzaitoyota
11-05-2005, 10:45 PM
Sorry, I already purchased a Flue made of UNOBTANIUM, CF Flues are only good to 800║F and since I added NAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWZZZZZ to it, the exhaust temps have skyrocketed!!!!! :)

imported_banzaitoyota
11-11-2005, 06:47 AM
Here is a pic of the first/bottom burner barrel I took last weekend. I test fired it and I am pleased with it so far.

I do not like the attachment method for the top barrel, I will post pics this weekend of how I solved that dillema

RTcat
11-16-2005, 01:12 PM
I recently had a Cleary building (pole barn) put up and am trying to decide how to handle the electrical. Eventually I'll section off a part of the shed for a dedicated workshop. Basic items such as woodworking tools, air compressor, welder, table saw, etc along with lights will be the main use of the ele.

99% of the time it will just be me in the workshop enjoying quality garage time so only one tool will be in use at a time.

My two basic options are:

#1 Tap into the 200 amp service in the house and run a 100 amp out to the shed.

#2 Remove the 200 amp socket at the house and replace with a 300 amp socket and run 100 amp to the shed.

Ignoring the difference in cost of the above two options, is #2 overkill?

Basically I'm wondering how many amps the shed will draw. What kind of electrical set up do you guys with separate standing workshops have?

Thanks,
David

wrench
12-04-2005, 08:04 PM
I used to heat my garage with a single barrel stove[vogelzang kit] .I really liked the heat, but I didnt like it burning when I was not in the garage. also your homeowners insurance wont like it very much either. I traded some chevy heads for a montgomery ward oil stove, not as nice as the wood burner, but I can turn the SOB off when I leave the garage at night. I see this is a month old but thought I would add my .02 worth anyway

z28toz06
12-05-2005, 06:53 AM
Being placed in a garage do you guys have any concerns about open fires and gas fumes etc. I would imagine that could be a dangerous combo, no?

billystargazer
03-11-2006, 07:04 AM
Please don't tear me up on this guys..... My brother had a double barrel stove in his shop. The barrels are way too thin, On too many occasions we had the bottom barrel glowing red hot. What happens when you heat something up too much? The metal becomes weak. I would not advise it, I'm a cheap bastard, but, I waited and picked up a nice wood stove for my garage.

I agree! I have had 2 and both were dangerous. First off, you need a lot of space between any garage structure and the actual stove. They do glow red hot at times and are, like all wood burning devices, hard to regulate. The mess caused by the wood is also another factor to consider.

tedbick
03-13-2006, 09:36 PM
i just thought i would add my 2 cents here if you use the 2 barrel kit and instead of using the top barrel as the flue pipe get some flue pipe and put it inside to create a seperate chamber to keep the carbon dioxide out you could use an old blower motor to blow air over the single walled flue pipe inside the top chamber.i have heard of some people using an old oil burner on the front of the barrel and burning there waste oil.

jimb
11-30-2007, 08:09 AM
I have also installed one of the barrel stoves in my garage. I paid the extra money and bought a barrel grate for it. This keeps the bottom from getting excessivley hot. Also you don't have to light a big fire in it to heat your garage. A small fire well controlled will keep it around 60-70 degrees when the weather is 23 outside. Also insulating the walls in the garage helps too. I also used 22 guage sheet steel with ceramic washers as spacers for a heat sheld behind the stove. I must say it works really well at reflecting the heat back into the space. You also don't need carbon fiber stack or pipe! Its very hard to find and VERY VERY expensive! You can use just plain old single walled or double walled black pipe as long as the connection for the outside stove pipe is clear of any building materials ie wood. You should be OK. Most codes state that you must use double or triple walled pipe to go through the roof! Just make sure your flashing covers the pipe and make sure you use caulk that is rated for high heat! to caulk the flashiing and pipe together. I have had this setup since september of 2007 and it has worked really well. Another thing when painting the stove, Buy the rustolum HIGH heat flat black paint. It costs about 5-6 a can but you get alot of paint for the price. I used two cans an was able to paint the stove with 2 coats and the pipe as well. That was after I stripped and sanded the barrel.:beer:

Northstar9126
11-30-2007, 02:38 PM
You should avoid having a barrel stove on any sort of combustible floor. They tend to develope rust though holes when you aren't around and were sure that you had the fire all the way out.

kbs2244
11-30-2007, 07:58 PM
The problem with 55 gal drum stoves is that they do not have the surface area to get rid of the heat they make. That is why they "burn out." A 2 barrel stove helps but the second one is realy too little, to late.
I used a kit on a 275 gal fuel oil tank. I used it for over 10 years. Lots of surface area to dissipate the heat, and just to make sure nothing got too hot I used a back and forth drug store fan to keep the air moving.
It would take 4 foot sticks and I only cleaned it out once a year.
You do have to learn how to adjust your intake air. Every installation is different. I had dampers in both the exhaust and intake to control the burn rate, and it took me about 3 years of fiddling before I was happy with the settings.

drjekyl30
01-30-2008, 10:12 AM
Very nice pic of the barrel. I am thinking of purchasing a barrel and kit from vogelzang. I have a contractor coming out today to look at my garage and give me an estimate on running the pipe out of the garage and up past my roof.

comp
01-30-2008, 05:20 PM
get pic and update us :thumbup:

DuckusCrapus
02-01-2008, 01:32 PM
I just purchased a kit hust like this and am starting on it as well. Interesting points made on here. Looks like I might look for another wood stove next summer to replace this barrel burner.


Seems like if you pay attention to it while burning you can't go wrong for the price. Space is the major drawback in my eyes.



DuckusCrapus

Eaglehoss69
04-15-2008, 02:01 PM
I would just like to tell you all that i used a double barrel stove for several years. I had a 32' x 28' garage and i worked in my t-shirt all the time it si a safe and economical way to heat your garage or anything else. Just you common sense and you'll be alright. Eaglehoss69

6768rogues
04-15-2008, 09:52 PM
I knew a guy 30 years ago who made a stove from a 275 gallon fuel oil tank and he burned old tires in it. It heated a huge garage where he fixed his 10 wheel dump truck. Probably a good thing that he lived in a remote area.

barrelman
08-14-2008, 10:05 PM
I used a single barrel with a Magic Heat reclaimer on top in my basement for 17 years.It was a great little heater,never a problem right to the point when I retired it.The barrel was still fully intact.My friend who turned me on to these barrel stoves still runs a double barrel in his basement after 22 years.He swears by them.

josh+audi=happy
09-08-2008, 05:30 AM
From what I've read so far about the barrel stove is that dissipating heat is a problem. So if I made a setup where I took one of my extra large truck intercoolers added one of my volvo fans to it and attached it to the barrel heat setup would it not dissipate the heat? THe volvo fan is rediculus, and so is the intercooler. If I was really creative I could make the fan temperature regulated.

josh+audi=happy
09-08-2008, 05:31 AM
also i'm making a sand blasting cabinet out of one these 55 gallon drums. I'm going to use the dual 55 gallon setup with the 6 inch adapters and the legs as parts for the blast cabinet. :-)

josh+audi=happy
09-08-2008, 06:14 AM
From what I've read so far about the barrel stove is that dissipating heat is a problem. So if I made a setup where I took one of my extra large truck intercoolers added one of my volvo fans to it and attached it to the barrel heat setup would it not dissipate the heat? THe volvo fan is rediculus, and so is the intercooler. If I was really creative I could make the fan temperature regulated.

to take it to the next level. How about this idea?

What if I were to make a barrel stove on wheels with a handle and keep it outside the garage. I'd weld on a 3 inch exhaust pipe setup so that i could run it through the garage door and attach it to the intercooler with the fan mounted? The intercooler would dissipate the heat and the garage would be warm, and I wouldn't have to worry about plumbing the exaust stack out the garage ceiling because all i would have to do it add a cap to the barrel heater?

When i'm done with it I could make sure it's completely out and either roll it to somewhere outof site or back into the garage. I've got a few ideas though on where i can roll it. I can even chain it up to the fence.

Oh.. I hope this works cuase i like this idea. I've even have a dust collector from harbour freights that i could turn into a blower setup for the barrel heater if I wasn't happy with the intercooler idea. The blower setup might even work just fine. All i'd have to do it add a hole to the garage door and plug it into the 115v. hmmmm...

great googly moogly i'm potential happy and completely lacking sleep since it's 6:13am in the morning and i've been thinking about this setup and the sand blasting cabinet all night.

josh+audi=happy
09-08-2008, 07:47 AM
to take it to the next level. How about this idea?

What if I were to make a barrel stove on wheels with a handle and keep it outside the garage. I'd weld on a 3 inch exhaust pipe setup so that i could run it through the garage door and attach it to the intercooler with the fan mounted? The intercooler would dissipate the heat and the garage would be warm, and I wouldn't have to worry about plumbing the exaust stack out the garage ceiling because all i would have to do it add a cap to the barrel heater?

When i'm done with it I could make sure it's completely out and either roll it to somewhere outof site or back into the garage. I've got a few ideas though on where i can roll it. I can even chain it up to the fence.

Oh.. I hope this works cuase i like this idea. I've even have a dust collector from harbour freights that i could turn into a blower setup for the barrel heater if I wasn't happy with the intercooler idea. The blower setup might even work just fine. All i'd have to do it add a hole to the garage door and plug it into the 115v. hmmmm...

great googly moogly i'm potential happy and completely lacking sleep since it's 6:13am in the morning and i've been thinking about this setup and the sand blasting cabinet all night.

I'm sorry about my multiple posts but i have a bad habit of doing it.

Is this even easier? What about two 55 gallon drums. One mounted inside the garage with a door and the wood, with legs and on wheels and a handle, and another just like it mounted outside the garage with a small flue? I'm trying to creatively do it as cheap and safe as possible?

I'm picking at least two drums up tonight, maybe three :-)

baldeagle650
09-08-2008, 04:58 PM
This thread cracks me up...

landi250r
12-02-2008, 12:08 PM
Hopefully you guys can help me with this....getting really frustrated.

Ok, I built my double barrel stove kit, look great. I built a rebar grate to go in it. I put a fan behind it to blow the heat to the rest of the shop.

The problem is that I cant seem to keep the fire going, do to lack of air I assume. then when I open the door to get air in, smoke comes rolling out and wont stop even after the fire is going well. I have approx. ten foot of pipe from the flue throught the wall to a T where i have a cap on the bottom to clean the chiminey out with, then the other side of the T goes up to the chiminey where I have mesh to keep the birds, etc out and then a cap to keep the water out.

Can some one please help me figure out how to keep the smoke out of the shop and get it going up through the chiminey? Thanks in advance.

Jon

landi250r
12-04-2008, 12:03 PM
Is there anyone that can help with this, I would realy appreciate it.

BTY, this site rocks, it has given me a ton of ideas for my shop. I will post some pics of mine after I finish the insulation install.

krusty the clown
12-04-2008, 12:28 PM
i use a barrel stove and had the same problem. the stove doesn't draft well to begin with so eliminate all of the bends and cleanouts in the flue, and lengthen your pipe to at least as high as the crown of the roof. the fire has to be hot to get the draft going through the upper barrel. i also found it helpful to cut an air hole in the back of the bottom barrel so air can get in to both ends, so the fire burns from both ends. once you have a good bed of coals it will draft fine with no smoke inside the shop.

kbs2244
12-04-2008, 12:48 PM
After you get the pipe up th ridge height thr this as a quick experment.
Try taking the cap off the bottom of your vertical outside piece.
The idea is to get a good draft going in that part that will pull from inside as well.
You may want to put a damper in the caps place so you can adjust the amount of draw.
The old oil aand coal furnaces had a air thermo controled inlet at the bottom of the chimminy.

Junkman
12-04-2008, 01:00 PM
I recently had a Cleary building (pole barn) put up and am trying to decide how to handle the electrical. Eventually I'll section off a part of the shed for a dedicated workshop. Basic items such as woodworking tools, air compressor, welder, table saw, etc along with lights will be the main use of the ele.

99% of the time it will just be me in the workshop enjoying quality garage time so only one tool will be in use at a time.

My two basic options are:

#1 Tap into the 200 amp service in the house and run a 100 amp out to the shed.

#2 Remove the 200 amp socket at the house and replace with a 300 amp socket and run 100 amp to the shed.

Ignoring the difference in cost of the above two options, is #2 overkill?

Basically I'm wondering how many amps the shed will draw. What kind of electrical set up do you guys with separate standing workshops have?

Thanks,
David

also i'm making a sand blasting cabinet out of one these 55 gallon drums. I'm going to use the dual 55 gallon setup with the 6 inch adapters and the legs as parts for the blast cabinet. :-)

great heating ideas.......:beer::thumbup::beer:

landi250r
12-04-2008, 03:19 PM
ok, I will try taking the cap off outside. the only reaso I didnt want to go any higher was to avoid cutting a hole in the side of my shop tin. the way that I ahve it running now is throught a spot that was going to be garage doors from the previous owner but were never installed.

One idea i had was to install a small blower on the front of the bottom barrel to blow air in.

Anther idea from a different site was to run a tube that had holes drilled in it through the bottom barrel right above the door that would suck air in.

I will post a pic of my setup tonight.

kartracer23
12-04-2008, 08:28 PM
My neighbor has one of these that he heats his entire house with. It just sits in the basement, vented to the chimney. Not connected to ducts or anything.:confused:
I was telling someone about it, and it happened to be his insurance agent. He said 'man, you shouldn't have told me that-I can't insure him if he's using one of those inside.'. Not sure if he dropped him or not.

jjkrjh
12-04-2008, 09:38 PM
We had a double barrel stove at our old house in the garage. It would run you out with the heat. But it wouldn't draft well unless we left the door open against the latch. If you closed the door it would stop drafting and start blowing smoke into the room. tried adjusting damper and air nothing helped. Replaced it with an old wood stove and didn't have any more problems. I liked the heat from it, might even try again.

Torque1st
12-05-2008, 02:18 AM
Tree limbs near the chimney will disrupt the draft also. I had that problem on a conventional fireplace that drew well for many years. A few branches trimmed away restored the draft.

landi250r
12-05-2008, 01:38 PM
Here are some picshttp://http://photobucket.com/landi250r

landi250r
12-05-2008, 01:40 PM
sorry,

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/qq3/landi250r/IMG00045.jpg

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/qq3/landi250r/IMG00046.jpg

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/qq3/landi250r/IMG00048.jpg

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/qq3/landi250r/IMG00052.jpg

http://i428.photobucket.com/albums/qq3/landi250r/IMG00053.jpg

krusty the clown
12-05-2008, 02:24 PM
the first thing i noticed is the bottom barrel should have been made so the bung is on the bottom so it could be left open. that way it pulls air in, under the fire grate. i would cut some holes with a 2" hole saw at each end below the grate.

the main thing to remember is the top barrell has got to get hot before it will draft. start your fire with smaller pieces of wood so you get a bed of coals quicker then you should be fine.

i lit a fire in mine this morning at 7:30. by 8:00 i had a bed of coals and then loaded it with wood, by 9:00 the shop was 52 degrees (it was 20 outside).

landi250r
12-05-2008, 05:36 PM
Ok, I will try that tonight...hopefully that work. I dont want to have to reconfigure the stack. Thanks

landi250r
12-08-2008, 03:43 PM
ok, thanks to you guys I got it figured out. First cut a hole on each end of the bottom barrel to let more air in, then I took the cap off of the botto of the T. I started a fire and all seemed good. I went outside to check the stack and almost all of the smoke was coming out the bottom of the T...bad... I was about to tear the whole thing down and run it through the roof when I remembered the question about the mesh. So I decided to check it just to be sure. Sure enough the mesh was full of creosote. I guess all of the times I tried to get a fire started filled it up with creosote. I removed the mesh....and good to go. Hopefully a birdy doesnt try to nest in the stack...could be trouble for them... :)

clutch47
12-16-2008, 03:22 PM
Yo,
I've been using a single barrel in my old garage for years. Just as every other post said, these barrels start kinda slow....Small fire at first, and work up. Mine drafts like a champ after about 15 minutes. If I feed it too fast without the draft open far enough when it is hot ,she'll start chugging, and trying to draft backwards...It's really kinda cool. I am bothered by the posters saying they built theirs with the bung on the bottom......and leave it open.....
WOW........... No wonder their stoves are getting red hot.
Mine is sealed up tight, lined with firebrick and works great. It never gets red, and I can get about 9 or 10 hours out of it with the right wood. Even longer with locust.
Clutch47

krusty the clown
12-16-2008, 04:37 PM
Yo,
I've been using a single barrel in my old garage for years. Just as every other post said, these barrels start kinda slow....Small fire at first, and work up. Mine drafts like a champ after about 15 minutes. If I feed it too fast without the draft open far enough when it is hot ,she'll start chugging, and trying to draft backwards...It's really kinda cool. I am bothered by the posters saying they built theirs with the bung on the bottom......and leave it open.....
WOW........... No wonder their stoves are getting red hot.
Mine is sealed up tight, lined with firebrick and works great. It never gets red, and I can get about 9 or 10 hours out of it with the right wood. Even longer with locust.
Clutch47

double barrells draft even slower.........with a double barrell w/o the bung open it won't draft enough to get upper barrell hot. with a hole in bothe ends open mine has never glowed red hot.

icfbob
12-30-2008, 09:28 PM
Great thread here. Regarding barrel stoves, I have some additional ideas.
I know this is garage related, but I will have my barrel stove outside.

I will have a double barrel style and a flat plate in the middle of the top barrel for more gas movement and the vent in the back of the top barrel.
Vogelzang has made a new model recently with dial air intakes on the door, just like the stoves. The door is gasketed also. A little more money too.

I will build a little house for my stove (concrete block maybe) and wrap copper pipe (1/2 inch) around both the barrels. I will fill the area between the barrels and the concrete with sand to absorb the heat and hold it like a heat sink. The copper pipes will stand off then barrels somewhat and will be buried in the sand. The heated water in the copper pipes then is pumped to radiant floor tubes put into the floor before the slab pour. You can put the heatedn water lines to a radiator type HVAC element and putr a fan behind it or plug it into your existing air handler.

You could do this for the whole house and alot cheaper than the outside boiler companies want to sell you one for.

I can put additional openings for air flow into the barrels and through the little house.

I pass this along for your S&Gs and any comments you might feel impelled to relate. Thanx

ICFBOB

kbs2244
12-31-2008, 03:38 PM
Have fun.
I wouuld try it without the sand for a season first.
BTW, Why would you put gaskets around a door that has vents in it?

Torque1st
12-31-2008, 07:07 PM
Have fun.
I wouuld try it without the sand for a season first.
BTW, Why would you put gaskets around a door that has vents in it?
So a person can control the draft properly. My uncles unit had gaskets.

rinny_tin_tin
12-31-2008, 08:09 PM
Not to be a party-pooper - but...one good fire and all the insurance company investigator needs to see is the remnants of an unlisted wood stove and its all over. They are not real even crazy for UL listed wood stoves, but they accept them - for a higher premium. A barrel stove will bring as much warmth to an the insurance co as a deep-fat turkey fryer. :)

TheEquineFencer
01-15-2009, 09:27 AM
HI guys, I'm new here but I've used a lot of differant ways to heat a shop. The torpedo heater is whatI used first, one with Kerosene, then a propane one. Both were OK if you're into jet powered vehicles, heat was good, noise sucked. Propane you could not use a regualr thermostat. I used a regular heater wood heater, worked good inside but made me a bit nevous leaving it or working with gas inside the shop. I then got smart and built a heater outside, enclosed in a metal air box, smoke was seperate from the air box, and plumbed a (2) 8 inch pipes through a metal plate in a window. One I forced air into the air box and the other brought the heated air into the shop. This worked OK. It was crude built but worked. My shop I have at home now, the other was a rented one, is 40 X 60 X 16, it has a taylor water heater outside, wood fired. When I poured the floor I put red PEX inside the concrete with Foam/Foil/Foam insulation under the floor before I poured. I heat with radiant heat from the floor in the office/ bathroom and parts where I thought I'd have work benches and such. If I'd know what I know now I'd have done the whole floor. I did not think I could heat the whole shop with the heater I had, it was used and cheap. I also added some heater coils above floor with low speed fans. It's cost me about $1500 for labor to get my wood cut and split, the woods free, for the past five years. I keep the shop around 45-50 in the winter and crank it up a little when I'm in working to 60, above that I start to sweat if I move around much. When I was working out of a freinds "shop", we closed in the one car carport, we built a 30 gallon barrel inside a 55 gallon barrel with 4 inch ducting and heated the shop. It was just big enough to get a full size Buick Electra in and be able to move a round. We used a heater motor/blower to force the air through our heater. Most of the time we had to crack a door to keep the temp down in the winter. We would take Luber-Finer filters from big trucks where I worked, cut them open and take the filter media out, roll it up in tin foil the size of baseballs, starta fire with pine tree "droppings" and put one of the balls into it. It smoked a little to start with but would burn clean and long, but the fire and smoke was outside. I ran into a guy when I was working in Texas, he took his BDL BRL heater, gutted the insidie of a Ford van, put it inside it and use the van as the airbox with it ducted to his shop. The guy in here that wanted to use sand has a good idea, it'll act as a heat sink, just like I use the water tank in my Taylor heater use the water in the tank to hold the heat. I'd put the heater outside in a box and duct it into the building, It's about the cheapest safest way to go for the low buck way. You can get a thermostat from Lowes' that run 120V to run a blower motor or use one that is storebought that plugs into a wall recepticale and what you are powering plugs into it. Well that's my .02 worth.

fireball 440
02-02-2009, 10:25 PM
Has anybody ever tried a single or double barrel stove with 30 gallon barrels?

willymakeit
10-23-2010, 11:49 PM
Has anybody ever tried a single or double barrel stove with 30 gallon barrels? We use to build them out of old water heater tanks. Had to burn the galvinize off wkich is toxic.

Frank_T
11-01-2010, 11:27 AM
Williemakit
Do you have any details on benefits to using a water heater? Other than they are free. Is it the same concept? Any tips/tricks?

Thanks
Frank T

Barrel Stove
11-17-2010, 02:13 AM
I just put one together with a 30-gallon steel drum. Originally wanted to use a stainless steel drum, but found out they cost $450. The 30-gallon drum was ordered without paint from Skolnik Industries (www.skolnik.com). I modified the cast iron door so that I could see into the barrel. The glass needs to be stove glass to withstand the heat. I also lined the bottom of the barrel with firebrick for both safety and efficiency. Next I lined the old masonry chimney with a stainless steel liner and installed the 30-gallon barrel stove into the existing fireplace. The iron pipe has holes drilled through to feed air for secondary combustion of the smoke. I have yet to aid a fan to force some positive air pressure through the holes. It seems that the natural draft is enough to pull super heated air into the firebox, since I see funky yellow/green/blue flames dancing around. Also, the key to not having a smoky stove is to burn dry wood and have a good draft and open the door slowly.

The stove throws off a lot of heat, many orders of magnitude more than the existing fireplace ever did. I even heat the basement through the old fire place clean-out in the bottom of the fireplace/basement, by adding a 6" flex duct and 250 cfm duct booster.

I went and got some high temperature paint (1200F), but I do not recommend it due to the smell. The true test will be when the temperature outside is -20F. So far it has only gotten down to 35 at night, but the forced air furnace has not turned on yet. Oh, I also added a smoke detector and a CO detector.
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/10-17-10_1624.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/P1040907.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/FirstFire001.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/P1040958.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/Retro-Drum.jpg

tatra
11-17-2010, 02:23 AM
did you use heat treated glass?..............

willymakeit
11-17-2010, 08:38 AM
Williemakit
Do you have any details on benefits to using a water heater? Other than they are free. Is it the same concept? Any tips/tricks?

Thanks
Frank TJust used what I had at the time. Thicker walls than barrels.

Barrel Stove
11-17-2010, 10:06 AM
did you use heat treated glass?..............

I used a transparent ceramic known as NeoCeram (wood stove glass). According to their web information:

About NeoCeram«
Neoceram« is commonly referred to as glass but it is actually a transparent ceramic. Neoceram is 3/16" or 5mm thick.

Ideal Solution for Woodstoves
Unlike true glass, NeoCeram« withstands continuous exposure to high temperatures without fear of destruction. It is also resistant to failure due to temperature variation. It is the ideal solution for many wood stoves and fireplaces where glass panels are less than 6 inches from the flames. You can get more fireplace and woodstove information at www.fireplacesandwoodstoves.com.

Strength and Durability
NeoCeram« can take the heat. Continuous temperatures up to 1470░ F (700░ C) can be withstood because this ceramic has an extremely low thermal coefficient of expansion. It doesn't run or swell at high temperatures the way normal glass does.

NeoCeram« can handle change. You wouldn't dare put snow or water on hot glass for fear that it would shatter or crack. Unlike glass, NeoCeram« can handle it.

■Available in 3/16 inch thickness (5 mm)
■Transparent-amber tint

This is the place I ordered it from:

http://www.onedayglass.com/

burleymike
11-18-2010, 08:18 PM
One thing I would do is add a baffle that goes across the top 3rd of the barrel with a 4 or 5" gap at the front to let the smoke exit. You should also line the firebox with insulating firebrick up to the baffle. I would make the baffle out of lightweight insulating firebrick for durability, for even better results you can put 1/2" ceramic fiber blanket on top of the brick.

If you look at how any modern clean burning stove is built they all have the secondary tubes like you already added with a baffle that is insulated. It will make the fire much hotter which will burn more of the smoke. Just be careful as it will be a hot burning SOB. Be sure to have a way to completely shut down the air supply if it starts getting too hot.

Barrel Stove
11-19-2010, 10:30 AM
Excellent advise. I added a steel plate to the top of the black steel pipe, but I think I should have made the steel plate wider. Does the baffle extend to the sides of the barrel, so that most (if not all) the heat/exhaust travels to the front of the barrel? I can see the benefit of making a longer passage for the heat to travel, keeping it in contact with the barrel surface for a longer period of time before going up the flue.

Also, should the air that goes into the secondary tubes be pressurized? If so, how hard should the air be blowing through the holes? It seems that the normal draft pulls in the heated air all by itself. However, I did take the turbine and motor out of an old hand held vacuum, and put it into a 4" PVC pipe, then ducted it into a manifold connected to the secondary tubes. The output of the tubine is varied with a 600 watt dimmer switch. Just for kicks, I turned the dimmer to full power for about 10 seconds, and created a swirling tornado of incandescent fire. It was brutal. Do not try this at home!

Thank you for your guidance.

babzog
11-19-2010, 10:51 AM
Does the baffle extend to the sides of the barrel, so that most (if not all) the heat/exhaust travels to the front of the barrel? I can see the benefit of making a longer passage for the heat to travel, keeping it in contact with the barrel surface for a longer period of time before going up the flue.

Also, should the air that goes into the secondary tubes be pressurized? If so, how hard should the air be blowing through the holes? It seems that the normal draft pulls in the heated air all by itself. However, I did take the turbine and motor out of an old hand held vacuum, and put it into a 4" PVC pipe, then ducted it into a manifold connected to the secondary tubes. The output of the tubine is varied with a 600 watt dimmer switch. Just for kicks, I turned the dimmer to full power for about 10 seconds, and created a swirling tornado of incandescent fire. It was brutal. Do not try this at home!

Thank you for your guidance.

Playing with fire is fun. :) Yeah, the baffle should completely prevent the smoke and hot gases from leaking around the sides and heading up the flue. You want to direct them forward, leaving a small gap (my Regency stove has only a 2" or so gap - you could probably do with 3-4") at the front to pass the gases. The hot gases then travel all the way back to the flue opening, heating that whole top surface. It also retains a lot more heat in the firebox for more efficient burning.

The old stove I put into the shop (few years ago) had a shot steel baffle. I had a guy cut out the old one (which did nothing - barely stopped the smoke from going directly up the stack) and weld in a plate across the back and sides, to act as a baffle akin to the Regency. Works well enough.

The tubes should not be pressurized (though, like I said, it's fun). They're only to permit a pre-determined amount of air into the firebox to burn off the smoke and volatiles. Interesting design you had - to heat them with the fire then re-direct them up and back. I bet that works really well!

Barrel Stove
11-25-2010, 10:36 AM
BurleyMike/Babzog

Adding the steel across the entire top to increase the exhaust path to the front, made an incredible difference. The residue on the inside of the barrel's top plate and secondary combustion iron pipe is now a tan color. The only downside is that wood consumption has gone up. In the Chicago area, a full cord of seasoned oak is $405.00.

Without a doubt, the double barrel design is the way to go. I wish I had the height in the fireplace box for the 2nd barrel, or even one of those fan forced heat reclaimers . The 2nd generation barrel stove will be more efficient.

Thanks for your help!

burleymike
11-26-2010, 09:16 PM
Glad it made such a difference for you. You may be able to decrease your wood usage by controlling not only the primary air but decreasing the secondary air. With my stove when you damper it down it cuts both the primary and secondary air. That makes the fire burn super hot yet lazy (slow). The slower you can make the fire burn the more heat will be given off to the room. As you damper it down further you want more secondary air than primary that way you are mostly burning the smoke coming from the wood.

You will have to do a lot of playing with your secondary and primary air ratios. If you can take the flue temperature a couple feet up the liner will give you a good idea how well you are burning.

A flue temp of 250-400, 350 is ideal. Burning in that range means you are burning clean and getting a lot of usable heat. If the flue temp is higher when you have it choked down and burning slow that means you are losing too much heat up the chimney.

I could not tell from the photos but did you build a block off plate in the top of your fireplace? If not It is something to consider. Just some 26ga sheet metal will do a lot to keep your heat from being absorbed by all the masonry in the chimney. If you can get your hands on some rockwool you can put some above the block off plate to provide some insulation.

AAFD
11-27-2010, 08:47 AM
I just ordered a USSC Barrel Stove Kit. I've read reviews that the USSC parts are better made than the Vogelzang parts, but nearly the same price, so I just went with it. It doesn't get too cold here, but my shop is a poorly insulated 1200sq ft metal building and the little propane heater doesn't do well when I'm moving around in the shop, but it has gotten me by for the past few years. I'd like to work in my shop comfortably over the short winter months.

Since my shop is a rental unit, I can't really make anything permanent. I have a panel on the roof of the building that I can remove and run the stack through, but it's location would require a few bends in the stove pipe to make it there. Plus it would have to go through a hanging ceiling and I don't want to risk damaging that.

I'm considering making mine portable with a 2"x2" angle iron frame with steel casters to roll the unit around. I figure I could park it under my 14' garage door, with the door open about a foot higher than the top of the barrel. Then allow the smoke to vent outside. I would then weld some scrap 16ga sheet steel to form a flange on the barrel, then I could wedge in 2 pieces of 16ga sheet to fit the gap under the open door and a couple bolts to keep it somewhat sealed up and enclosed. Now that I think more about it, it would probably cook the metal door, but what other options do I have? The area around the garage door is the only open area that the heat wont really affect anything in the shop. I could easily roll the barrel heater outide when I'm done and put out the fire and leave it outside overnight so prevent any smoke/fire to my shop.

I've considered popping a hole in the corner of the roof, and putting the heater in the corner where I do my fabrication work, stacking bricks or cinderblocks around it, and putting up a few layers of cheap foam-type insulation board and some cheap flashing to help keep the heat off the shop walls in the corner. This would probably be the best method, but it takes up valuable shop space, is not portable, and costs more to setup than the other option.

I need this to be easily portable without costing too much, and provide a larger heated area than the little propane tanks and not as much fumes & noise as the kerosene torpedos. I have an unlimited supply of free pallets for fuel so the wood heater is the cheapest method for me. I can break these pallets up and crack them over my knew for fast fueling. The winters here are short, and not very cold compared to other parts of the country, but to me, it's too cold to work sometimes and I'd rather be productive in the shop than shacked up in the house.

Any ideas on making a barrel heater portable?

Also a few questions for guys who use these types of barrel heaters...

How do you put out the fire when you're done?

How hot does the area around the heater get? (I read there's a recommended 3-foot gap from the walls)

I've heard of sand/firebricks placed at the bottom. Is there a certain type of sand? What the hell are firebricks?

Excuse my ignorance...I never grew up in a cold climate, never had a fireplace in a house, nor a furnace/basement, any of that stuff. Where I'm from, having cool AC 10 months out of the year is a necessity. It was 75-degrees on Thanksgiving day, now it's 27-degrees at night just 2 days later...

Thanks

AAFD
11-27-2010, 09:34 AM
A few more questions/ideas...

Can the Flue be put on the back of the barrel and run the pipe out horizontally about 6 feet, then upwards? Would I need a fan or something to help draw the smoke out of the flue? Would the fan decrease the heat generated by the stove or increase it by pulling more air across the fire?

klogan121
11-27-2010, 05:10 PM
I modified the cast iron door so that I could see into the barrel. The glass needs to be stove glass to withstand the heat.

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/Retro-Drum.jpg[/QUOTE]

I love that NeoCeram window you incorporated into that door! I want to be able to see the fire in my barrel stove, and this is a great idea!! :thumbup: A few questions: What are your dimensions of that NeoCeram? Did you use grade 8 bolts to withstand the heat? The nuts/bolts/washers looks like they just sandwich the glass to the door... What type of sealant did you use? Any issues with the glass sooting/blackening up?

I imagine the best way to cut that door was with a plasma cutter! :wtf:

Thanks!

Kevin

burleymike
11-27-2010, 07:32 PM
AAFD, If I were you I would either get permission from the landlord to cut a hole in the roof for a proper chimney. If that is not an option you might consider a barrel stove that will heat water, you could keep the stove outside and circulate the hot water into the shop and run it through a radiator.

Wherever the stove is you will need a properly sized chimney for proper draft. 12' is probably minimum 15 would be better. The less horizontal runs the better every elbow reduces the draft so a straight vertical run is preferable.

AAFD
11-28-2010, 06:50 AM
I was talking with my dad about this over some leftover turkey. We drew up some napkin plans and talked about the pros/cons to making this an affordable and portable unit that I can stow away in the warm months.

I think the quickie MS Paint Drawing below will be my first attempt at building my barrel heater setup.

I know everyone says not to put extra bends in, but running the exhaust out of my doorway will be the easiest way and the best location in my shop away from anything flammable. My metal fabrication area is near the doorway and there is nothing in that area but metal so nothing can burn there.

I figure the extra bends would help keep more heat in and slow down the burn. I could always add a fan to siphon the air through the pipe if this idea doesn't work.

The only alternative idea I see here is to use a 30-gallon barrel on top of the 55-gallon barrel, and run the exhaust stack out the top rear of the 30-gallon barrel and then through the door.

I figure I would use 6" plumbing pipe nipples & elbows, or just a couple of straight stove pipe sections depending on which way I build it. I would over insulate the pipe where it would run through the opening of the doorway to reduce temps in that area. I have industrial heat wrap for oil refinery applications that I can wrap that section with as well.

I also have some 1" Super Tuff-R Sheet Insulation leftover and can make a section that wedges into the open doorway and has a hole in it to fit snuggly around the insulated exhaust pipe. I have some leftover "Lizard-Skin" that I can apply to the area around the hole in the insulation to also prevent it from crapping out in that area.

Doing it this way I can just open the door, wedge in the Sheet Insulation, roll the barrel near the door and push it through the opening in the sheet inulation, light the fire and work with warmth.

What do you guys think?

burleymike
11-28-2010, 11:34 AM
First off safety first, be sure to insulate the section of pipe going through the door with high tempature insulation. Fiberglass will have melted by the time the pipe reaches 1000f, rockwool will work but ceramic fiber is the best option as it can handle over 3000f. If you were to have a chimney fire the rockwool could also melt if the temp gets much over 2000.

You are going to need a draft inducer blower. The smoke will not know whether to go out the door when you open it or the chimney. If you extract enough heat from the chimney before the blower you could use an inducer blower off an old gas furnace. If the flue temps are too hot you will need one for wood stoves $$.

Barrel Stove
11-29-2010, 12:24 AM
"I love that NeoCeram window you incorporated into that door! I want to be able to see the fire in my barrel stove, and this is a great idea!! A few questions: What are your dimensions of that NeoCeram? Did you use grade 8 bolts to withstand the heat? The nuts/bolts/washers looks like they just sandwich the glass to the door... What type of sealant did you use? Any issues with the glass sooting/blackening up?

I imagine the best way to cut that door was with a plasma cutter!
Thanks!

Kevin"

Kevin,

Here are the details.....they get you on the shipping cost!
Shape: Square/Rectangle
Glass Type: Ceramic
Glass Thickness: 3/16 Neoceram
Edgework (Step 1): Seamed Edge
Width: 7 1/2"
Height: 8 1/2"


No need for grade 8...just plain old 10-32 screws with large heads...yes, the washers hold the glass in place. I threaded the holes for the screws so that I could get the screws good and tight first. Set the Neoceram onto a thick bead of RTV. Only finger tighten the nuts, so you don't crack the glass and alow for any dissimilar thermo expansion. RTV bleed out some clear goo...then turned a chaulky white..It still provides a good seal....so I am not worried.

I made a 6 1/2" X 7 1/2" opening in the solid cast iron door. First scribe the lines, then drill many holes just inside of the lines...then slowly saw the remaining metal...then clamp in a vise and start filing...It took about an hour..it's only cast iron....you could probably do a quicker job if you are skilled with a saber-saw with a fine tooth metal cutting blade.

The glass can soot if you do not burn the fire hot enough...It is very easy to remove with one of those utility knife scapers (used to remove city window stickers, etc.). Don't bother with the polishing paste they sell, although I used a car finish polishing compound...worked very well, but slowly.

Keep Warm!

SgtRauksauff
11-29-2010, 01:13 PM
We've got a barrel stove in my father's garage, which used to be our home furnace when I was growing up. I don't remember the brand of the kit, I'll have to look into it. We're still using the original barrel from when we built it over 35 years ago. It was built with a "heavy-duty' drum, not the lightweight thin ones that can be had for super cheap. No bricks or lining of any type has ever been used.

He also made an angle-iron cage for the barrel, and then wrapped it in some sheet metal. Big squirrel-cage motor in the back, and two 6" duct pipes out of the front. A few years ago, I was working in the un-insulated 24x24 garage in jeans and a t-shirt, as comfortable as could be, when it was -25 outside, with 40+mph winds. Being that the barrel is as old as it is, it' nearly time to replace it. We also want to install some sort of heat exchanger on the chimney, to pull a little more heat out.

I'll try to get some photos and put them up in the next few days.

--sarge

klogan121
12-01-2010, 07:27 PM
Barrel Stove,

Thanks for the dimensions and info!! I am saving it for when I get my barrel stove going next summer. No funds now :(. The kerosene salamander heater will have to do this winter.

Again, much appreciated!!! :thumbup:

Kevin

klogan121
12-02-2010, 03:33 PM
Barrel---

What is the dimensions of your door opening? I just bought one today and it measures 9 1/2 x 10 1/2! I think Vogelzang is now making their door kits smaller!! I may take this one back for the US Stove Co.'s barrell kit, as I think the door opening may be bigger!

What a disappointment!!! :wtf:

Barrel Stove
12-02-2010, 09:15 PM
10 3/8 wide X 9 3/4 tall. I bought the model BK100E. You may have bought the kit with the clean out door.

Improved700
12-06-2010, 07:12 AM
Barrel,
Could you provide some more information on your baffle and black iron pipe design? Pictures would be a huge help. I am not totally understanding the baffle and metal piece that you have added. I was at the store yesterday, looking at some of the newer wood stove's and can see sorta what they have done, but I am looking at adding a barrel stove to my shop, and am very interested in your design.

Thanks alot,
Kev

Ed ke6bnl
12-06-2010, 07:43 AM
Here is a pic of the first/bottom burner barrel I took last weekend. I test fired it and I am pleased with it so far.

I do not like the attachment method for the top barrel, I will post pics this weekend of how I solved that dillema


thats the brand I put together for the house many years ago. mine was single 30 gallon and worked better then the one I sold it for a store bought $400 stove. I did keeep plenty of ashes in the bottom and some fire brick. That worked great for several years. and will accept plenty large logs. ED

SgtRauksauff
12-06-2010, 03:04 PM
We finally fired up Tortoise (the nickname for the stove, since it's got short stubby legs and looks like a square turtle) yesterday. Bought two boxes of fire bricks at Menards (12 bricks, six per box) and put three rows of four bricks into the bottom of the barrel. With it being about 15░F outside, we got the (still un-insulated) garage to about 50░ after about 25-30 minutes. We held it there for a few hours, and played with the front vent until we could maintain a good solid 450 - 500░ on the stack. The circulation vents were putting out 140░ at one point. We just have a box fan blowing across the stack right now, but we think that one of the Magic Heat or similar "heat extractors" might be a nice addition. I checked the garage temp about 6 hours after the fire was burned out, and it was at 42░. The insulated garage door itself has already proved to be an amazing heat retention device!

--sarge

Barrel Stove
12-06-2010, 06:22 PM
Barrel,
Could you provide some more information on your baffle and black iron pipe design? Pictures would be a huge help. I am not totally understanding the baffle and metal piece that you have added. I was at the store yesterday, looking at some of the newer wood stove's and can see sorta what they have done, but I am looking at adding a barrel stove to my shop, and am very interested in your design.

Thanks alot,
Kev

These videos inspired me to make my wood burning barrel stove.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5PxcjvpKNM&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHty-Fo8opc&feature=related

LennyTheLizard
12-06-2010, 10:23 PM
COOL THREAD.

I've been brainstorming using this type of stove. I already set my shop up for radiant heat in-slab. Now, I just need to decide the heat source. The only source of energy that I have available currently is Electric. Wood is pretty easy to come by where I'm at. I have been contemplating buying a barrel stove kit, but I want to find a heavy duty barrel or maybe an industrial type tank of some sort.

I've been thinking that the heat given off by convection will be great. The real idea though is to roll the barrel with copper tubing and circulate water through it. Then I can run through a manifold system and run the hot water through the floor to distribute the heat more evenly. I think it can be done economically, but I don't imagine my insurance agent would appreciate it too much. Seems this whole system can be done for a fraction of what an outside wood furnace costs.

SgtRauksauff
12-07-2010, 01:25 PM
Finally took some photos this morning before leaving for work. So, Here's Tortoise, the woodburning barrel stove, built in 1978:

http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4554-3/Tortoise001.JPG

A closer up view of the front. The barrel kit was a SOTZ brand. The two pipes in front are where the hot air comes out of. We've got the one closest to the wall blowing directly across the stack, so it helps with convection. The box fan against the wall helps too.
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4558-3/TortoiseFront.JPG

Back view of the unit. you can see the blower motor at the bottom. My father originally put in the pipe in case he wanted to do some sort of hot water thing. Never really got around to that, though.
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4562-2/TortoiseBack01.JPG

And a closer picture of the door. Sealed with fireplace cement I believe. There used to be a nice round vent flap, but we had a thermostatic vent on it at one point in time. Until the thermo-spring inside broke, and we couldn't find the original flap. so a square of 1/8" steel works for now...
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4566-2/TortoiseDoor01.JPG

the inside of the door. You can see that the air has a channel to move down the front of the door, so when you get a good draft going, there's a nice blowtorch effect going through the wood inside, rather than just over the top.
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4577-2/TortoiseDoor02.JPG

And here's the chimney. Straight stack, no bends. The top is even with or a little higher than the roof's peak. Plenty of room under the double-wall section to add the heat exchanger.
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4570-3/TortoiseStack.JPG

--sarge

klogan121
12-07-2010, 10:24 PM
Sarge,

Does the weight of that entire vent stack rest on the stove? If so, it must not be too heavy on the barrel. Also, the stack going thru the roof-- is it a simpson dura vent triple wall or a double wall pipe?

Thanks for the pics, gives me ideas when I get my barrel stove together.

Kevin

Barrel Stove
12-08-2010, 06:59 PM
Here is a video of the secondary air tubes operating.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDBf-C5waKg&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

You can see flames shooting from the area close to the holes on the bottom and top tubes. The hot air is being drawn into the fire box without any input pressure.

Outside temp is 15F....30-gallon unit keeps a 90 year old brick bungalow warm. Room with stove got to 86F before I turned on the forced air furnace motor to mix up the air.

Wish I had the vertical room to add the second drum. I've BBQ'd chicken breasts, hot dogs and a nice porterhouse to perfection. My wife thought I was nuts until I made dinner for her.

97Tahoe
12-10-2010, 05:18 PM
You guys should check with your homeowners insurance , 99% of em will not cover a garage with any kind of wood burning stove.

Barrel Stove
12-11-2010, 10:47 AM
Sarge,

What is the temperature range as the hot air exits? Your stove looks very functional and efficient

Ernst

SgtRauksauff
12-11-2010, 08:02 PM
Sarge,

Does the weight of that entire vent stack rest on the stove? If so, it must not be too heavy on the barrel. Also, the stack going thru the roof-- is it a simpson dura vent triple wall or a double wall pipe?

Thanks for the pics, gives me ideas when I get my barrel stove together.

Kevin

Currently, Yes the entire weight is on the barrel. When we put in the heat extractor, we'll actually be putting in a support between the rafters.

The through-the roof part is insulated double-wall, not triple-wall with air between the layers.

Sarge,

What is the temperature range as the hot air exits? Your stove looks very functional and efficient

Ernst


Today, the thermometer on the short vent read 155░F. This was when the fire had been burning for awhile, right at the 300░C (~575░F) mark on the stack. The coldest part of the building, the entry door on the opposite wall, has a thermometer in the garage door opener control, and that read 62░F.

24x24, no insulation except for the overhead door and one front corner.

I was in the "hot" corner, mounting/balancing some snowtires, and I was down to just a shirt and pants. it actually felt refreshing to go outside into the ~30 drizzle/sleet/snow to get the rims.

I can't WAIT until we get the insulation tacked up to the rafters, that's going to keep so much heat down, and useable, that I might just have all my projects done by springtime!!!

--sarge

therealwormey
12-11-2010, 08:54 PM
my dad has a stove i built from the oil drum that used to feed the old orginal oil furnace that they had in the late 60s.that drum was out of service but in the air off the ground till about 10 years ago. i used a single barrell kit for the door and dampner,didnt use the kit legs.the legs are pipe that screw into the original holes.its not a round barrel,its the tall one,its about 6-8 inches off the floor and comes to my chest,its been burning for over ten years at least and hasnt rusted out.no wood is too long,if you can carry it then it will probly fit,the other cool thing is the chimney is a 18'' road colvert like you use for your driveway,its 20 feet tall so it drafts like a vacuum cleaner,its shows a little rust on the opposite side from where the stove pipe comes in,i used a colvert as well for mine,they work great,galvenized so they dont rust.if they stay in the wet ground for years, then standing in the air it should last for many more years.i think i paid 150 bucks for mine,4-5 years ago.only drawback is they're heavy and hard to stand up. if you live in a ritzy neighborhood it might not fit in

sealer
12-19-2010, 12:06 AM
My 40 X 40 pole barn shop isn't insulated, and only has a partial concrete floor for now. With a nice supply of free wood out back, it only made sense to burn wood. I used to work for a trucking company that had the "oil tank" barrel stove in their shop. That thing really cranked out the heat. Sooooo, since I had 2 oil tanks, I figured this is the way I was going to go. After scoring 18ft. of double wall pipe and the "T", wall thimble, and cap for $125 (I had to remove and patch the hole in their wall), I ordered 2 barrell stove kits.

I have this approx. 12ft from the wall due to the loft, so I had a lengthy horizontal run with a slight rise to the outside pipe. I didn't use all the double wall pipe, just through the wall and outside. Just like to mention, on any horizontal run, make sure you have a rise, so any creosote will run back into the stove. Also, make sure your pipe is attached so the creosote stays inside the pipe. You don't want it running down the outside of your stove pipe. The only thing I had to fab was the outside wall support. I just didn't care for the store bought supports......

I did fill the entire bottom of the tank, up to the bottom door, with stone to insulate it. I think that's the key to prevent "burn-outs" with barrel stoves.

I do have a fan sitting on the edge of the loft and angled downward toward the stove, just to pull the heat down from that stove pipe run and to circulate the stove heat. It works nice.

Anyways.....Here's some pics:

sealer
12-19-2010, 12:20 AM
I did add another 3 ft. section of pipe outside after these pics were taken. Just wanted to be sure and get a good draft. Also would like to add, that my messy shop is now cleaned up, lol...

Some more pics:

klogan121
12-19-2010, 12:52 AM
Nice setup, what is the upper door for? What temp does your building get up to with the stove going?

sealer
12-19-2010, 01:20 AM
Didn't really need 2 doors. I just wanted 1 lower so it's easier to remove ashes, and 1 higher so I can throw wood further back in the stove easier.

As far as temps go, I was out there a couple days ago and my therm. read 13 degrees f., I walked out 5 hrs later and it read 50f.

Wasn't really paying much attn. to the therm while out there, so I couldn't say how long it took to reach that temp.

6768rogues
12-20-2010, 06:04 PM
I knew a guy who built a stove from a barrel kit used on a fuel oil tank. Then he burned tires.

klogan121
12-21-2010, 08:44 PM
I knew a guy who built a stove from a barrel kit used on a fuel oil tank. Then he burned tires.

I'm not a greenie, but burning tires? WTF? :wtf: I wonder if the cops were ever called on him with all that smoke burning tires gives off!

xd_45er
12-26-2010, 10:34 AM
I love mine.

http://i623.photobucket.com/albums/tt314/xd_45er/057.jpg


http://i623.photobucket.com/albums/tt314/xd_45er/113.jpg


The thermostat is about 10' away. The stat reads HI when the temp gets above 100* :bounce:

klogan121
12-26-2010, 04:50 PM
Xd, what size barn you heat with that?

Nice setup!!

SgtRauksauff
12-27-2010, 05:25 PM
Sealer, I like that oil barrel setup!

My father and I are actually in the process of setting up a similar unit for my uncle. Our tank just barely fits between the wheel wells in the back of his pickup, so it's about 46 inches tall, barrel only). One of the welded-on leg supports got bent at some point in the past, with a tear in the tank right along the weld. That'll get patched up, and I think we're planning on using some regular barrel legs that we have. maybe fix it up with some pipe for legs, though, maybe not. I'm pretty sure we'll only be doing one door, though.

--sarge

sealer
12-28-2010, 05:38 PM
Only one door is all that's needed. It just makes it easier to get some wood towards the back. And having a door down low makes it easier to remove ashes. Just watch where ya put it. It really puts off the heat!

xd_45er
12-29-2010, 03:10 AM
Xd, what size barn you heat with that?

Nice setup!!

Thanks, its a 24x30 with 10' walls. Im in the process now of studding up between the posts and insulating and covering with OSB.

SgtRauksauff
01-11-2011, 01:12 PM
We did a little bit more to Tortoise last weekend. Went and got a "heat reclaimer" from Menards, the small-size one, just to see how good it would work. It was pulling about 200░ out of the stack! it was about 550░ just below the box, and 350░ above it. The built-in fan doesn't blow a HUGE amount, only about 80cfm, but it's definitely enough to get some air movement and push some heat into the air, and still keep the rest of the stack from getting too cold.
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4636-2/TortoiseHeatReclaimer.jpg

We also braced up the upper part of the stack, so the full weight is no longer resting on the barrel. I just used two of the clamp-type holders, with 2x6's between the rafters to hold them in place. One may have worked, but two makes it that much more sturdy.
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4632-2/TortoiseChimneyBrace.jpg

Finally got some decent lighting in there, some "High Output" T8's, so pictures show up better.
Backside:
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4628-3/TortoiseBack.jpg

Frontside:
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4640-3/TortoiseFront_001.jpg

Hopefully, we'll get to finally putting up the insulation this weekend, and will be able to keep that place cookin'!

--sarge

klogan121
01-11-2011, 02:58 PM
We also braced up the upper part of the stack, so the full weight is no longer resting on the barrel. I just used two of the clamp-type holders, with 2x6's between the rafters to hold them in place. One may have worked, but two makes it that much more sturdy.
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4632-2/TortoiseChimneyBrace.jpg



--sarge[/QUOTE]

Were those clamp-type holders purchased from Menards? Thanks for the photo, good reference as my stack will go up the roof at the same spot yours is! :thumbup:

SgtRauksauff
01-11-2011, 05:18 PM
yep, Menards it was! i don't remember how much they were, I'm pretty sure less than ten bucks each.

-sarge

walrus
01-11-2011, 05:45 PM
Backside:
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4628-3/TortoiseBack.jpg

Frontside:
http://sharkpork.com/gallery/d/4640-3/TortoiseFront_001.jpg

Clearance to combustibles isn't an issue with that stove a few inches from the wall?

AndysMBgarage
01-12-2011, 04:30 AM
Clearance to combustibles isn't an issue with that stove a few inches from the wall?

A piece of cement sheeting would fix the heat transfer to the stud frame.

In my old garage I had an old car LPG bottle welded vertically on to a steel car rim with a flue on the top. A door is cut into the side half way up with a ring of 20mm holes about 200mm up around the bottom to let air in. The grate was rods of bar through the 20mm holes #. I had it in the corner flued out to a rotating cowl top. Being in the corner the walls had to be lined in cement sheet.

I left it in the garage when I sold the house but I have a couple of similar ones down the side of my house I use for chilly nights after a BBQ. Unfortunately the salt sea air has given them a rusty appearance but the metal thickness means they are still quite usable.:thumbup:
http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g10/R107roadster/P1020168.jpg
http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g10/R107roadster/P1020167.jpg

SgtRauksauff
01-12-2011, 01:24 PM
^^^ I like those! easy to make, easy to use. Gotta use pretty small pieces of wood, though. Perfect for someone with a wood shop!

Clearance to combustibles isn't an issue with that stove a few inches from the wall?

Keep in mind, the white sheetmetal wrap (16ga if I remember correctly) around the stove does not touch the barrel itself, and is about 2" away on the sides. So there's already a pretty thick metal shield between the barrel and the studs, and nowhere for flame to go other than out the stack, or the door. You can hold your hand within an inch of the surface at full burn and not feel uncomfortable, and with the air circulation going through the inside, and the distance away from the wall, I'm absolutely not worried about starting a fire that way.

However, wall insulation will be going in soon, with probably some corrugated metal siding, so everything should be fine at that point.. We don't light the stove unless we know we're going to be out there long enough to burn what's in it down, and we don't leave the fire un-tended during that time.

--sarge

Nick M
01-15-2011, 09:11 PM
My 40 X 40 pole barn shop isn't insulated, and only has a partial concrete floor for now. With a nice supply of free wood out back, it only made sense to burn wood. I used to work for a trucking company that had the "oil tank" barrel stove in their shop. That thing really cranked out the heat. Sooooo, since I had 2 oil tanks, I figured this is the way I was going to go. After scoring 18ft. of double wall pipe and the "T", wall thimble, and cap for $125 (I had to remove and patch the hole in their wall), I ordered 2 barrell stove kits.

I have this approx. 12ft from the wall due to the loft, so I had a lengthy horizontal run with a slight rise to the outside pipe. I didn't use all the double wall pipe, just through the wall and outside. Just like to mention, on any horizontal run, make sure you have a rise, so any creosote will run back into the stove. Also, make sure your pipe is attached so the creosote stays inside the pipe. You don't want it running down the outside of your stove pipe. The only thing I had to fab was the outside wall support. I just didn't care for the store bought supports......

I did fill the entire bottom of the tank, up to the bottom door, with stone to insulate it. I think that's the key to prevent "burn-outs" with barrel stoves.

I do have a fan sitting on the edge of the loft and angled downward toward the stove, just to pull the heat down from that stove pipe run and to circulate the stove heat. It works nice.

Anyways.....Here's some pics:

Any issues with the sides glowing red hot? I am about to make one, and am thinking about cutting the whole thing open to line it with firebrick. Also, are those US Stove Company doors? Do they provide enough draft?

Thanks! I really like your stove.

sealer
01-16-2011, 10:33 AM
Nick, I've had it filled with wood, and an awesome fire going. Never got red hot. When I do get it goin real good, I usually turn the box fan on that's behind it, just to move some air by it. You could see how well the stone on the bottom works, the paint is still untouched all the way around it, up to where I stopped. I'm sure the fire bricks wouldn't hurt if you wanted to go that route, but I've worked at a place years ago that has one of these, and except for it getting a little wavy, it never got cherry red or burned through. Oh, and they burned lots of wood like pallets and stuff that burned really hot.

Another thing.....With the stone on the bottom, you could pretty much touch that part with your hand, and just feel some warmth. If you lined it with the fire brick, would you get the heat transfer that you'd really like? I'm no expert, so not sure about that one.

As far as draft goes, The little vent on the bottom of those doors keeps it going once I have a nice fire. But, I usually have the bottom door cracked open a bit. The wood burns faster, but hotter. And don't forget about the pretty long horizontal run I have, too. You might not have to do what I do to get it that hot.....

Nick M
01-16-2011, 08:15 PM
Good point regarding the temp of the bottom with the stone. I may just run it this season without the brick and see what its like. I could always add later.

Thank you for originally posting your stove up Sealer, it was real motivation for me to make one, and it looks great! After looking for a big enough stove and not finding much, and having an empty tank to use, it seems like the best way to go.

goodwithtools
01-18-2011, 01:53 AM
I'm looking to make a barrel stove kit ASAP, as I already spent more than I want to on oil.

I'm trying to make this a semi-green project by re-using as much material as possible. Used barrel, stove pipe (if I can find it) etc... But I'm also thinking green as in money to!

Can I used regular 'red' construction bricks to line the barrel with, instead of 'fire bricks' (or what other materials would well also?)?

How far from the top of the barrel is the baffle plate to make the secondary combustion?

Anyone know or have and GOOD write-ups on making these barrel stove and improving the kits as well?

Thanks in advance!

nocoldhere
01-28-2011, 04:14 PM
Here is a forced air furnace built out of a DB drum stove. The blower is set up as a 2 speed fan it changes automatically. The blower automatically kicks on at 110 and high speed kicks in if the temp in the outlet vent gets over 210. This cools the building back down and drops back to low speed and eventually off as the fire dies. Its heating a 3500sq ft house built in 1929 with 12ft ceilings and no insulation. It has cut the light bill $250 to $350 a month. We are still working on the efficiency and the cosmetics.

madeinwales
01-29-2011, 08:12 AM
I wish I could have a barrel stove kit, but they do not ship to the UK, tried Northern tool and others but with no success.

sealer
01-29-2011, 10:49 AM
Make a friend in the U.S. and have him send it to you......

tdevlin
02-01-2011, 07:53 PM
Has anyone put a barrel outside and ran the piping inside? Curious about this.

Dragster Racer
02-01-2011, 08:10 PM
Did I see a post a while back with a greenhouse being stored inside next to the barrel stove? I would think that would melt when the stove started running hot.?

terrydk
02-26-2011, 03:06 PM
Looking for some input on my double barrel stove's 6" stove pipe exiting through the metal siding of my shop. Does anyone know of a wall thimble for this application or is it needed if the combustible (wood) wall studs are at least 6" away from the hole and pipe? Right now I have a hole cut in the metal siding that just accommodates the 6" pipe. Not sure how much heat transfer I will get if any from the stove pipe through the metal siding to the wood framing.

theoldwizard1
02-26-2011, 09:33 PM
My Dad had a regular wood burner in his 30x40 uninsulated garage. The problem was when it was near zero and the wind was blowin' and the stove roarin', your butt felt like it was on fire and your hands were still freezing.

He just gave up working in there in winter ! Finally got a place in FL for the cold months !!

goodwithtools
02-26-2011, 09:37 PM
TerryDK-

Just put in a stove in my Live/work space.
Vented through the wall/window.

The window was modified to fit a large AC unit. Where the pane of glass above the AC was removed (due to the size of the AC) and replaced with a particle board panel. We wanted to go through the particle board rather than losing another window pane.

We trimmed out the center of the panel where about an inch of board was left on the boarder. I had a piece of aluminum cut to fit where the panel was (about 28x18). I used this as my 'thimble' where a section of Class A double walled chimney pipe passed through and connected to my black single wall stove pipe inside the building. I used that inch board to attatch the aluminum to. I used plenty of caulk along the boarder of particle board and along the edge of the aluminum. Then to secure it even more, used sheet metal screws to tighten everything up.

The Class A pipe has to have a 2" clearance from combustibles. Class A pipe is supposed to enter inside a minimum of 2" and mine comes in about 6". From the aluminum panel, there's a good 4+" to where the particle board panel is and the aluminum works as a heat sink to absorb and dissipate and excess heat. This also faces the outside, so if any heat is absorbed into the aluminum it's lost very very quickly.

To sum this up to make even more sense.... imagine an aluminum 'window pane' where Class A pipe goes through. I wasn't about to spend another couple hundred of dollars on a thimble when this does the same thing for next to nothing!

(the first pic is the before and the other 2 are afters... there's silicon caulk around the aluminum panel. then the black caulk around the Class A pipe is Rutland's RTV500 caulk, can take temps up to 500degrees. You can also see an aluminum shield on top of the AC unit.)

okiereb
02-27-2011, 10:42 AM
Great forum! Just got my double barrel stove kit and am ready to get started on it. Have read all the past posts and am gonna make use of everyones good and bad experiences. Also think that I will put piping thru the top barrel with a blower on back to use it as a heat reclaimer as seen on a lot of exhaust plenums. Thanks for all the great info and I'll post back with pics on my results.

terrydk
02-27-2011, 10:46 AM
I just went ahead and picked up a 6" trim collar so I can enlarge the hole in the metal siding, center the pipe in the collar so the pipe isn't touching the siding, that should give it enough clearance to the metal that it wont get too hot. I also picked up some 1/2" Wonderboard to put on two sides of the stove to protect the near by wood studs and help reflect some of the heat back into the shop. I realize this isn't going to 'heat' the shop but will be a place to 'warm up' when it is cold.

Barrel Stove
11-14-2011, 09:51 PM
I had the chance to take some pictures of the 30-gallon barrel stove with an IR camera. You guys might get a kick out of them. I ordered a SS barrel and will be working on a REV. A model.
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/IR000105-1.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/IR000109.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/IR000111.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/IR000114.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/IR000120.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/IR000121.jpg

Can you tell where the fireplace is located inside the house?
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/Wood%20Sove/IR000122.jpg

Charles (in GA)
11-14-2011, 10:15 PM
there's silicon caulk around the aluminum panel. then the black caulk around the Class A pipe is Rutland's RTV500 caulk, can take temps up to 500degrees.

When I installed my waste/used oil furnace, the instructions for the Simpson chimney said to use 500░F sealant to seal the double wall to the outside of the thimble. I called several places that should know, fireplace stores, etc, finally called Simpson, got the same answer everywhere, they could not recommend a brand or product, just that everyone used typical RTV and it worked fine. It seems no one had ever heard of Rutlands (at least they did not mention it) and I did web searches for 500 degree RTV and the like and could not turn up anything. I finally settled on a 425 degree RTV in a caulking gun tube from Home Depot and it seems to work OK, however, I have bookmarked the Rutlands web site and will keep it in mind if I have to remove the existing RTV and reseal the pipe.

Thanks for mentioning it.

Charles

klogan121
11-14-2011, 11:28 PM
Barrel stove, nice pics with the IR camera! just got my stove up and running this past month.

Torque1st
11-14-2011, 11:41 PM
The Rutland furnace cement can be purchased at any good hardware store. The local ACE hardware has it.

For setting and repairing furnaces, heaters, stoves, and boilers
Gas-tight and fire-proof
2700 deg F max
Also a firebrick mortar

VairKing
11-15-2011, 06:18 PM
I put this in the other thread but looks like it should go here:

Check my pic, my drum heater is in the background. Sorry I dont seem to have any great pictures of it. I stood the bottom drum on end and used a 2" hole saw to cut several holes, then inserted exhaust tubing through them and welded everything up. Then I use an old fuel oil furnace's blower to blow air through it. With enough wood in it it would easily heat my non insulated no ceiling shop quite nicely. The one draw back was the foot print it took up. My new shop has in floor heat run off my wood boiler, so I may have the barrel stove for sale soon.

Its been a few years since I ran it, but now that I look at the pic I remember I built a riser base to get it up off the ground to ease my back pain, and then used a box fan above it to help scavenge heat off the upper barrel. These things take tons of wood to get enough heat to overcome lack of insulation. The fuel oil furnace could still be used for normal operation without a fire.

greythorn3
11-16-2011, 09:50 PM
great thread just wiating on my kit to come in at ace! then i will be putting it in my dirt floor pole barn, with no insulation, gonna be nice! got the volgang kit or what ever its called. want to raise it off the ground to keep the fumes from igniting, and probably jus tgo straight thru the roof with the pipe maybe do the out the side wall and up with all single wall tho. who knows

dave67fd
11-16-2011, 11:43 PM
When I installed my waste/used oil furnace, the instructions for the Simpson chimney said to use 500░F sealant to seal the double wall to the outside of the thimble. I called several places that should know, fireplace stores, etc, finally called Simpson, got the same answer everywhere, they could not recommend a brand or product, just that everyone used typical RTV and it worked fine. It seems no one had ever heard of Rutlands (at least they did not mention it) and I did web searches for 500 degree RTV and the like and could not turn up anything. I finally settled on a 425 degree RTV in a caulking gun tube from Home Depot and it seems to work OK, however, I have bookmarked the Rutlands web site and will keep it in mind if I have to remove the existing RTV and reseal the pipe.

Thanks for mentioning it.

Charles

Charles,
I have used the Permatex RED hi-temp RTV. The Ultra copper is good to 700 deg. intermittant and about 500+ sustained. Available at most any auto parts store.

tncatadjuster
11-17-2011, 09:28 AM
Just built a second one for a friend. Here is mine, I welded the top section of a second drum, so I can place pallets in without cross cutting.

http://youtu.be/X4kcBFmCrNY

djd99
11-27-2011, 08:02 PM
Installed one of these this weekend as well, These things heat like a banshee.... After 2 hours my 30x40 is 76 degrees........
http://i411.photobucket.com/albums/pp193/donjd1/074.jpghttp://i411.photobucket.com/albums/pp193/donjd1/078.jpg

klogan121
11-27-2011, 09:29 PM
Installed one of these this weekend as well, These things heat like a banshee.... After 2 hours my 30x40 is 76 degrees........
http://i411.photobucket.com/albums/pp193/donjd1/074.jpghttp://i411.photobucket.com/albums/pp193/donjd1/078.jpg

Nice setup! Did you make the air inlet tube on bottom yourself?

djd99
11-27-2011, 10:02 PM
Nice setup! Did you make the air inlet tube on bottom yourself?

Thanks, yup I took a 2" nipple and welded a nut to the end and made a cover to fit the hole.

Tomww
03-05-2012, 04:47 PM
I want to burn drip waste oil into my simple barrel burner. Has anyone just rigged up a drum above the barrel and dripped oil in through drilled out hole in top of barrel? I plan to drill hole in top of barrel and pushing a 12" steel tube in to hole to fit snugly with 6" protruding in to the barrel and 6" being left sticking out of top of barrel. I would then lead a thinner copper tube in to the steel tube with a gravity oil feed controlled by a tap to drip feed into the barrel literally dropping oil onto the wood fire below. Anyone add few tips to improve on this for me. I want to keep it simple as possible.

6768rogues
03-05-2012, 07:50 PM
A guy I used to know built a barrel stove using a 275 gallon fuel oil tank. He burned tires in it and it would glow red. He had a huge uninsulated shop and it was warm enough to work in a t-shirt. Probably not a good idea today with environmentalists around every corner.

abetageek
05-14-2012, 08:13 PM
For some strange reason, Unobtanium is very hard to find. but we mine it here in OZ. and correct about the carbon fiber flue.
It does not matter how hot the stove gets as long as flammable objects are far enough away.
regarding "thin" the thinner it is the better it transfers heat.
Yes do not leave unattended.
And you CAN control the burn rate with the damper and
dont put so much fuel in it, D U H
I heated my house with an old Round Oak Stove from Grand Rapids MI
as I lived in MI for 65 years'
It was cast but the vertical barrel was steel,
I had a stainless plate on the wall behind it,
remember Farenheit 451
this post was hilarious

Abetageek@gmail

abetageek
05-14-2012, 08:16 PM
Dont bother to paint it

ecurb_1160
09-08-2012, 09:02 AM
Heres mine been useing it for 3 yrs now been the best heater for garage/shop I ever had!!!!

Herb
09-08-2012, 11:24 AM
Slightly off topic here, but... Years ago-maybe 40- we went over to my uncles house to see his new wood stove he had just finished building. It was pretty big, made out of some type of old boiler- really heavy duty- and about 15 feet from his chimney. He had gotten that thing fired up about a half hour before we arrived and it was really cooking- I mean it was HOT!!!!! It was in the early winter, but his basement had to be 90 degs. The scary part about that visit was when we got there, the whole stove AND 15 feet of stove pipe were glowing cherry red! Like I said it was HOT!!!! Somehow the wood that was in it burned out before the house burned down, and when the stove cooled off he figured out a way to put a damper on it so it wouldn't burn unregulated...:wtf::spit:

greythorn3
11-29-2012, 12:56 AM
Barrel stove are extremely dangerous. The also work extremely well......

i know a guy with one in his house. aint burned down yet. be he smokes too and we all know thats dangrous also.:lol_hitti

trbomax
11-29-2012, 12:09 PM
I want to burn drip waste oil into my simple barrel burner. Has anyone just rigged up a drum above the barrel and dripped oil in through drilled out hole in top of barrel? I plan to drill hole in top of barrel and pushing a 12" steel tube in to hole to fit snugly with 6" protruding in to the barrel and 6" being left sticking out of top of barrel. I would then lead a thinner copper tube in to the steel tube with a gravity oil feed controlled by a tap to drip feed into the barrel literally dropping oil onto the wood fire below. Anyone add few tips to improve on this for me. I want to keep it simple as possible.

I had one setup like that .The problem I had was the drip tube would carbon up and end up blocked off after a couple days. To vercome that I ran a 1/2" pipe in the side of the lower barrelclose to the top at a45 deg angle. Where it came out of the barrel I used a "T" with a plug in the end.I ran the oil into the 90 deg side of the "T". When it stopped dripping I could pull the plug and run a 3/8" drill thru the drip pipe to clear it. Put your regulateing valve on the oil tank end and run 1/2" copper from the resivor and a 1/2" gate valve for regulation.The reason for this is that no matter how careful you are there willbe crap in your oil and a smaller valve and line will catch it and plug up. Use a gate valve,a ball valve will not provide the accuracy you will need to adjust this,plus the knife action will make it un affected by debri.Its really easy to over fire with a set up like this,I would put a magnectic thermometer on the top of the lower barrel where the tube goes in.You dont want to exceed 700 deg ,more than that will comprimise the structural integrety of the lower barrel.I would mix the waste oil at 10/1 with diesel to allow it to flow better and its easier to strain when you dump it into the storage tank. Keep your storage tak at least 10' away from the stove and do not leave it unattended,you can get a runaway very easily and the storage tank will soak up heat from the stove if its too close,makeing it require constant adjustment to prevent an overfire.

I used the oil drip for a couple years and it will work,just stay in the habit of monitering it closely. It will create some nasty smelling black smoke so if there are any greenie natzies near by you will end up being an asshole for doing it.

edit) sorry about the sp and missing spaces,my carple tunnel is killing me today!

Barrel Stove
08-26-2013, 12:27 PM
I'm designing a barrel stove, and will be using a 30-Gallon Stainless Steel barrel. The secondary combustion air supply tubes will also be SS. The black iron pipe I used for the first stove burned out in a few areas. I will also design a larger door with larger stove glass, and a more accurate way to regulate primary and secondary air. I'm toying with some sort of rotisserie and grill grate feature.

I do have a question ...... The bottom of the first stove is lined with fire brick as seen in the following jpegs:
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f73/2004PassatTDI/FireBricksInstalled001.jpg

There are 5 rows of fire brick. Is it better to have 3 rows? Will the flames/heat transfer easier/faster if the top left/right row is removed? Any rule of thumb for how high the bricks should go?

I will use an insulated SS sheet on the top third to provide a ceiling for the hot secondary combustion air to burn the remaining combustibles.

Thanks for any replies.

Ernst

Clik
11-29-2013, 02:28 PM
I've built many barrel stoves over the years. I guess being hobbyists we tend to look for ways to turn something simple into a project.

There's no need to buy a kit. Unless you just like the look. You don't need a cast iron door. Think about the weakest link. You can just use the piece you cut out as a door.

If you want a cast iron door for the look, you can buy them cheaply at a masonry supply house where they are sold as chimney cleanouts.

I used a thin type manhole cover on one just for the novelty.

You don't need a flu ring. Just cut a hole and shove the flue pipe in the top. use a couple of scraps of tin to make an *L* shape like a small shelf bracket and screw to the side of the flu and into the barrel.

Don't worry about sealing and caulking because fire doesn't comeout of voids, air draws in. That's why you can just use the piece you cut out as a door.

Don't bother complicating things with a second barrel, they just complicate getting a draft started.

Burn through: I never had one burn through even using the thin barrels and making them glow red. They corrode through due to the corrosiveness of the ash and smoke residue when not in use. The moisture in the air combines with the ash and residue and is very corrosive. I just keep them simple and change them out every year or two.

No need to bolt door flue etc. Sheet metal screws work fine.

No need to line with brick. Just leave some ash in the bottom.

Make sure you put a dampner in the flue close to the stove to control heat, draft, and the rare chimney fire. Fire in the flu pipe is usually from creasote build up. Choking fires down creates creasote and so does cold air blowing accross uninsultaed pipe.

I burned trash, waste oil, plastic bottles and whatever and never had a problem.

Common sense prevails. These were shop heaters NOT basement heaters!

wizard124
12-01-2013, 10:01 PM
I was given a barrel stove kit last year to replace my existing wood burning stove which was too small for my garage. I finally had the time to put it together but I've yet to install it because I want to replace the existing stove pipe. I was looking to order new DuraBlack 6" pipe to connect to my existing chimney pipe. My problem is that I don't know which adapter to use to connect to the chimney pipe. I have been looking on northlineexpress.com and they said that they need to know the manufacturer of the chimney pipe in order to suggest the proper adapter. I bought the stove and chimney pipe second hand so I don't know the manufacturer of the chimney pipe and its not written anywhere on the pipe. I sent them several pictures of the existing chimney pipe and adapter but it didn't seem to help. Does anyone know the brand or manufacturer of the chimney pipe from the pictures? Any help would be greatly appreciated since its getting really cold and I don't have any source of heat in my garage.

Thank you
Dave
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekZEtkNUp4RVNWTHM/edit?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekaU9sQnJkSXBRbGM/edit?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekblZQaGhkUElaaGM/edit?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekcU1KRXN1eWRDM00/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekZEtkNUp4RVNWTHM/edit?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekaU9sQnJkSXBRbGM/edit?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekblZQaGhkUElaaGM/edit?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0JiRNEZViekcU1KRXN1eWRDM00/edit?usp=sharing

I'm not sure if the pics came up since I'm using google drive so I posted the urls to the pics and put them on photobucket.

<iframe width="480" height="360" src="http://s1018.photobucket.com/user/daddona124/embed/slideshow/Stove%20Pipe"></iframe>

klogan121
12-01-2013, 11:51 PM
http://www.menards.com/main/heating-cooling/venting/wood-fireplace-stove-venting/insulated-double-wall-stove-venting/supervent-6-x-36-chimney-pipe/p-1323305-c-6894.htm

Check the above link.... This pipe looks to be a supervent pipe. I have this on my wood stove in the pole barn. :thumbup:

Menards has different lengths also.

Shop Specialties
12-01-2013, 11:59 PM
It is hard to tell with those pics but I would try a Selkirk 6T-DSAC. I have made it work on other brands of pipe.

milkbone
12-12-2014, 09:38 AM
right when i was about to throw the stove away i found this great site, i hope you can help. i am trying to cut my power bill in half for the winter, summer time it runs about 80 dollars a month but in the winter it climbs to around 300 dollars. i have a 55 gallon drum that i made into a stove. i used the kit from the hardware store. i followed the instructions and put the stove together. i built a fire in the stove why it was outside and it burned about 1/3 of the paint off.(the drum was a new greese drum, it was black) i then moved the fire to the front and burned the rest of the paint off. i moved the stove into the house, placed 4 inch thick concrete blocks behind and under the stove. i put 50 pounds of sand in the stove and lit it. it burns good, plenty of heat, but the stove keeps turning white and then the white substance starts falling off. why? i am thinking of scrubbing with sos pads and then painting with fire proof or high temperature paint, will this fix my problem? thanks for any help