View Full Version : Pinewood derby


crazytrain
01-08-2013, 04:27 AM
My son has been asked to participate as a guest in a pinewood derby race with a local cub scout group. I have all the rules and guidelines to follow but the last one I built was when I was a little kid with my dad. I am looking for some help coming up with cool designs. So lets hear your thoughts and see pictures of any cars you my have built. I have searched google and found a lot but we are still looking for something different and looking for some design ideas.

TIA:3gears:

joedodge
01-08-2013, 04:40 AM
The fastest one I build when I was a kid used the flat weights on the botom of the car and was shaped like a door stop and that's what we called it it was a winner and fast too

kunkernator
01-08-2013, 05:56 AM
^^^ That is what always won. Also, make sure the axles and wheels are lubed up with lead dust. It helps a lot.

Jsf721
01-08-2013, 06:28 AM
Not sure I recall the rules 100% but If I remember the over all weight of the car cannot exceede a certian number of Oz. The winner my year 40 years ago drilled out the rear of the car almost hollow and did the same to the nose. Then inserted small. fishing weights in front of the front axel and it won by a wide margin all night. Please make sure this does not break any rules before proceding.

Camper
01-08-2013, 06:46 AM
Kinda into this with the grandson right now....
From what I read shape does not matter alot.
Polish the crap out of the axles so they shine like a mirror
Lube up the wheels and axles with a graphite lube.
Weight should be 5 oz.....center of gravity about 1" in front of rear axle.
Make sure wheels and axles are set so car runs straight.
There are books you can buy (daughter bought one) that explains all this and more

dreamingmuscle
01-08-2013, 07:00 AM
Take a square with you to the store and make sure the axle slots are truely square to the body. All of the rest, rest on this one thing. You can polish axles and put all the graphite on them you want. but without aligned axles the car will bump the side guards on the track. Which will scrub off most of the speed.

Next is the axles polish them up and if you can take the two little humps off from under the head of the nail. (a very tricky thing to do) Then weight I believe 5 oz is the max they can be. The post office is very helpful if you don't have a good scale at home. Make sure the car is exactly 5 oz. Make sure you can take off some weight or add a little at the race just in case there is a differences in the scales.

Glen

3dkustoms
01-08-2013, 07:26 AM
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j223/3dkustoms/7-2-12038.jpg

This is one that we did for my daughters event. As said above the best trick is to make sure that the axle slots are square. The one we started off with was not so we had to work a little more on the bottom. We also sanded the tires smooth and polished them, not sure if it helped but i think it may have.

shoot summ
01-08-2013, 07:31 AM
We had several rules when we did them.

1) The kids build the cars(this is really what it is all about).
2) We had several build sessions for them to work on them, they had access to everything needed to build, and guidance.
3) We had a "Dad's class" where the Dad's could build a car to race or show, pretty much anything goes.

There are many speed tricks for PWD, as mentioned there is little if any aero affect of the shape, it is all about wheels, axles, placement, and weight.

cbacres
01-08-2013, 07:34 AM
Agreed on polishing the nails ( axles) and graphite. Dont over look the underside of the head, deburr and polish the heck out of it.
Also, when you set the nails, setas to take as much slop out without creation friction on wheels.
Like the other said, the alignment is key.

We kept polishing and spinning the wheels on the nails until it would spin smoothly, then added the graphite, man it sung.

My sons car beat the dog poop out of everones car, they kept looking at it and suggested we might of cheated. All of the mention items are allowed.

This was 8 plus years ago, but still remeber the smile on my sons face.

Mike007
01-08-2013, 07:35 AM
My father was a machinist. He would take the wheels to work and true them on a lathe. When "we" installed them "we" would make sure they were straight and all sat flat on the ground. Lead weights would bring the cars weight right to the max limit. I won every year. I had a lot of trophies. :3gears:

cdd1
01-08-2013, 07:44 AM
My father was a machinist. He would take the wheels to work and true them on a lathe. When "we" installed them "we" would make sure they were straight and all sat flat on the ground. Lead weights would bring the cars weight right to the max limit. I won every year. I had a lot of trophies. :3gears:

You must be my long lost brother. My dad wasn't a machinist, but we did have a metal and wood lathe at the house, so when I brought the pinewood derby car home, he snatched it and ran downstairs and "we" put it together.

He would lathe the wheels so that there was less surface contact (theoretically to reduce friction, but I wasn't so sure it really mattered). As the others, we used the classic "wedge" style and always made sure that the car weighed as much as possible--just melted (lead, I assume) solder into drill holes in the bottom of the car.

woodrail
01-08-2013, 07:54 AM
I had to organize pinewood derbies for several years back in my "scout days"! In general, these are the worst events and these are the best events! Veterans scouters probably understand what I'm saying.

I use to have a great set of "rules" or " suggestions". The funniest one I remember went something like "...if your son's build involves a CNC machine, you've gone too far..."!

Mike007
01-08-2013, 08:02 AM
My father was a machinist. He would take the wheels to work and true them on a lathe. When "we" installed them "we" would make sure they were straight and all sat flat on the ground. Lead weights would bring the cars weight right to the max limit. I won every year. I had a lot of trophies. :3gears:

I actually didn't win every year. I came in a close second once. My friend won. His dad was a machinist too. :mad:

1320stang
01-08-2013, 08:02 AM
Weight placement depends on the style of track. Some tracks are a constant slope, others are steep slope and long flat, some are a parabolic curve. Some are homemade pieces of crap. Also, if scouts are handling the cars, they need to be built bulletproof.

Stuart in MN
01-08-2013, 08:40 AM
We had several rules when we did them.

1) The kids build the cars(this is really what it is all about).



This is the most important thing - let your son build it with your assistance, not the other way around.

froggert
01-08-2013, 08:48 AM
my nephews participated in a local pinewood derby a few years ago. one of the kids in the pack was fresh off the boat and his father had no idea what to do building a car. so they just put the wheels on the block of wood and entered it. he ended up being the fastest car in the competition. :eyecrazy:

cincinnati_kid
01-08-2013, 08:51 AM
my nephews participated in a local pinewood derby a few years ago. one of the kids in the pack was fresh off the boat and his father had no idea what to do building a car. so they just put the wheels on the block of wood and entered it. he ended up being the fastest car in the competition. :eyecrazy:

maybe it was a sleeper. All go no show haha.

woodrail
01-08-2013, 08:53 AM
Here a video of a past project out of "The Rocket Shop".

The World's Fastest Pinewood Derby!:

http://youtu.be/o-ob6IAolWY

Mike007
01-08-2013, 08:58 AM
my nephews participated in a local pinewood derby a few years ago. one of the kids in the pack was fresh off the boat and his father had no idea what to do building a car. so they just put the wheels on the block of wood and entered it. he ended up being the fastest car in the competition. :eyecrazy:

Thats a riot. :spit:

joe.gravelle
01-08-2013, 09:12 AM
Here a video of a past project out of "The Rocket Shop".

The World's Fastest Pinewood Derby!:

http://youtu.be/o-ob6IAolWY

In the student organization I was in during middle and high school, the Technology Student Association, we would design CO2 dragsters. Tons of fun. Plus there is something called F1 in schools which is sort of like the Formula 1 of CO2 dragsters. Everyone has the same basic design and everything is documented and presented and the world championship races are pretty serious. A friend of mine just went to Thailand for the races last year and they won.

When we set up the track for the races it takes a few hours just so its perfect. A lot of the winning cars are made on CNC mills so their weight is at the absolute minimum by rules and as aerodynamic as possible.

I remember making my car and it was underweight by a hair so I took it back to my hotel room and painted a few more layers of paint to get it to weight.

mikester
01-08-2013, 09:17 AM
This topic just came up on another site that I frequent so it looks like I have to tell this story twice !
When my son was in the Scouts he got the kit for the car. He told me what he wanted it to look like. There was a nice sized shop at my job so I took the stuff to work. The guy that I worked with helped his son build his car and it won two years in a row so he offered his help. We stuck the tires on a lathe and put a very slight taper on them. Less surface, less drag. Deburred the little nails and polished the crap out of them. I formed the body on the belt sander. My son had to do the finish sanding, paint and decals. After it was painted we put tiny pieces of teflon tape on the body so the tires wouldnt rub on the paint. I used melted lead and cut a groove into the bottom of the car so we could get the weight right. It took close to two weeks of working every lunch to get my end of it finished.
We go to the race. The first car that my son had to race blew his doors off. The kid cut the block into a wedge and screwed washers to the front with a drywall screw.
End of story. :o

thundermug
01-08-2013, 09:26 AM
Me and my two brothers were all in scouts at the same time. We had to draw the design on the block of wood and rough cut. Then my dad would do his part.

One year I went to district finals (or whatever). I went up to the track in front of a crowd at the local shopping mall, placed my car on the track, and won. Then the guy placing cars at the track says to me, "Hey, your fly is down."
And it was.

boro_boy70
01-08-2013, 10:07 AM
Heres a link to my sons car from last year.

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=134663

We just finished cutting his car for this years race. This year he wanted to do the Titanic. It still has to be painted, I'll try to post some pics later. The race is this Saturday, so we have to get this thing done!!

Falcon67
01-08-2013, 10:07 AM
Here a video of a past project out of "The Rocket Shop".

The World's Fastest Pinewood Derby!:

http://youtu.be/o-ob6IAolWY

I used to do that when I was a kid - but "rogue". Model cars, planes, regular rockets, etc + Estes rocket engines. In the street, from the garage roof top - guide wires are for contests :D . I'm sure the neighbors thought I'd either work for NASA or be in jail forever. In today's world, maybe "budding terrorist" :lol:

mooman
01-08-2013, 10:09 AM
This site has got more information than you'll ever need.
http://www.derbytalk.com/
My two boys have their Pinewood Derby races this weekend. Doing two cars at the same time is a bit of a ball buster.

Our last years car is also in this post as well. http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=134663

my58
01-08-2013, 11:04 AM
My kid never won the race but we both have the best memories building the worst cars.

This is were the saying "its the journey NOT the destination" proves to be true.

Enjoy the time just working on it and watching your kids face as they do the work. Kids grow up really fast and before you know it they are adults themselves. Enjoy!

GarageDan
01-08-2013, 11:13 AM
It's all in the axles and getting the weight to exactly 5.0 ounces. Be careful, this can be addictive. The most important thing is for you and your son to work together in the shop building the car, build some memories and remember "It's his car." I've always let my son do all the work that was safe to do, so basiclly everythign except the scroll saw by himself. I held his hands on that.

We have a great set of memories about the PWD and it's his favorite event from cub scouts. I'll be over the last 5 years we built close to 40 cars in the family.

I usually built my own cars and he built his. We worked side by side in the shop and my son learned to use a drill press, lathe, scroll saw, hand drill, sanders, dremmel and lots of hand tools. Great experience. :)

YMMV.

BD1
01-08-2013, 12:54 PM
Wow ! This brings back memories. Time well spent for sure.
I took some 1/4''OD soft copper and flared one end. Drilled 1/4'' hole in top of hood. Looked pretty neat. Three duces.:3gears:

joedodge
01-08-2013, 01:05 PM
Dad always let me make it as ugly as I wanted lol never butted in it was great and man a couple of years werw ugly

MoonRise
01-08-2013, 02:31 PM
Step One: Check the local and applicable rules.

Step Two: Recheck the rules.

Some rules allow wheel and axle mods, some allow 'minimal' axle clean-up and polishing but no mods to the wheels, etc.

For the design, have him pick and choose or look around for whatever he likes (design-wise).

Then you and he sketch it out on paper and then transfer that shape/design to the block of wood. Cutting, grinding, shaping, and sanding commence from there (refer to Steps One and Two, some rules say no power tools, others anything goes as far as tools used).

If power tools allowed (with supervision), the ubiquitous Dremel with some sanding drums or shaping burrs is usually enough to enable some pretty 'good' shaping work (operator skill permitting).

Safety First with tools (hand or power)!!!!! Protect the eyes and the ears (Dremels are rather loud!), as well as the lungs (dust is not good to breathe) and hands (firm grip and control the tools being used!).

Have fun and make sure he has fun with the design and fabrication.

For the speed-related mods, that usually means polish the axles (if allowed per local rules) and especially the little burrs under the nail heads. Some rules allow you to use (or replace) the axles with a single solid axle per front/rear (usually better alignment than four individual 'nails'), some rules so no mods to the pre-cut axle slot and you have to use the four 'nails'.

Get the weight to the max allowed (usually 5.0 oz on the 'official' scale). With all else being equal, a 5.00 oz car will usually be faster than a 4.95 oz car. Check the rules for the max allowed weight.

Check the rules for any allowed or prohibited lubes. Most seem to allow the powdered graphite lube (messy but works OK), most do not allow drippy liquid lubes.

Some rules specify no mods to the wheel/axle/body interface (no thrust washers). Know the rules. Smooth hard paint (or just some smooth bare wood) with graphite powder is usually pretty good anyway, friction-wise.

Post pics and have fun!

IndyGarage
01-08-2013, 02:37 PM
If you want a fast car, there are three tips which will get you one:

1. Add weight until the car tips the scales to the limit - Make sure you do this with the official weigh in scale - take stick on weights.

2. polish the axles and get them in perfectly straight - make sure the wheels turn freely- use a glass table top to get all four of them even, then superglue the axles into place and don't bang or drop the car afterward.

3. Build 10 of them this way and pick the fastest one.

Mattlt
01-08-2013, 04:11 PM
There is one school of thought that says to only have 3 wheels touching the track - less friction.

Do lots of test runs, lubing it up with graphite every so many runs. You may even want to build a temporary test track at home, it wouldn't have to be very long. Chucking a pencil in a drill and touching it to the wheels to make them spin also helps to get things broken in.

machine_punk
01-08-2013, 04:23 PM
First, I believe the child should be the primary builder of the car. This is really about them. Yes, there will be dad-built cars there, but this really is about the child developing skills and confidence from work HE does himself. I remember being the young scout and my dad building the cars. I don't remember single thing about that race day. Now, with my stepsons, I let them do pretty much all the work. They draw it on the block, I help with bandsawing the general shape, then they do the rest, including painting.

Our scouting troop had a 'dad' class, so we could build our own cars and show off. Here is mine. I think it is cool, but the weight is in the wrong place and it was consistently the slowest car...
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15898

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15897

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15899

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15901

Notice the gray fades to white underneath.

Kev

GarageDan
01-08-2013, 04:57 PM
I've got photos of my son sitting at a lathe turning his own wheels. No one ever believed it was him until last year. Now he teaches younger boys how to work the lathe and turn their own wheels.

There will be "cheaters", dads who build the cars for their sons or bought parts. This is a valuable lesson that can be taught to your son. Pride in a job well done without cheating. There will be cheaters in life and they do win sometimes. It isn't fair, but have class and know that you did your best. This happened to us several times and my son accepts it now and just knows that some people suck.

On the other hand.... He loved knowing that "HE" build a car that beat some dads and cheaters! My favorite is having the college physics professor asking him about weight placement, center of gravity and such!

GarageDan
01-08-2013, 05:01 PM
First, I believe the child should be the primary builder of the car. This is really about them. Yes, there will be dad-built cars there, but this really is about the child developing skills and confidence from work HE does himself. I remember being the young scout and my dad building the cars. I don't remember single thing about that race day. Now, with my stepsons, I let them do pretty much all the work. They draw it on the block, I help with bandsawing the general shape, then they do the rest, including painting.

Our scouting troop had a 'dad' class, so we could build our own cars and show off. Here is mine. I think it is cool, but the weight is in the wrong place and it was consistently the slowest car...
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15898

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15897

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15899

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=1368&pictureid=15901

Notice the gray fades to white underneath.

Kev

Kev,

Nice car. Your problem isn't the weight I don't think. It's your wheels. Official BSA wheels are probably faster that those. Are those Awana wheels?

rockchucker
01-08-2013, 05:24 PM
Here is mine from when I was a kid. Pops only supervised. This was all me. It was not super fast but I did ALL of it with Pops Tools. I was awarded the best style award with it being named "The Woody". The Roll Bar is missing as it fell off somewhere in the last 30 years along the journey. It is more about the Journey than winning or losing as somebody already stated.

Those of you that are building your kids cars for them should be ashamed. You are teaching them absolutely nothing.

http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h41/generacerator/DSC05291.jpg


If you want to win then make the thinnest Door Stop as you can adding all of the weight in the Rear or at the highest point of take-off. Polish the Axles, True the Wheels with a V shape to reduce drag and aerodynamic and use Dry Graphite as lube. The less contact patch the Wheel has the less drag. Thin coat of smooth paint with some Wax on top and bottom.

The Pinewood Derby has never been about winning. It is about learning and doing.

kiatech
01-08-2013, 05:41 PM
I remember my grandpa putting the nails on a lather and using graphite dust to lube em up!

06 DIESEL
01-08-2013, 08:21 PM
This thread brings back so many memories. The last car I raced was in an open class, rules required it to use BSA wheels and axles, and fit on the track, not in the normal box. I think mine weighed over a pound or more. It won the first race by a landslide and moved the entire track back a few inches when it hit the end of the track. It managed to bend the front two axles and I never won another race, but boy it was fun.

Keep in mind, axle placement is not required to be in factory location, or at least it wasn't for my area.

volvo
01-08-2013, 08:38 PM
..
This subject seems to come up every year, so get yourself a case of beer and do a good search and read till your hearts content on over a decade of great ideas.

The one I always heard from work was the the painters kids always put some of the most slippery drops on earth on their axles and always were a winner. Drops were a fish eye remover additive.

darwyn
01-08-2013, 11:39 PM
Traveling for work, so no pics, but my son and I built a pickup truck one year. We put the lead weights in the bed :)

Just remember, if you win you have to race again the next weekend ....

Solid Lifters
01-09-2013, 12:04 AM
Bust out the Dremel tool and polishing compound and go at it. Fishing lead sinkers in the bottom center of the car. These are a MUST.

Robinhood
01-09-2013, 01:01 AM
Here are two my son and I did:
http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q293/IowaRobinhood/Jake/2012-04-08_16-15-53_961.jpg

As others have said, the key is the weight. Whatever your maximum allowed weight is, get as close as you can to that. Use a scale a small digital scale. We melted lead and poured it into drilled holes in the bottom and rear of the cars. Also, if your rules allow, shave the wheels as skinny as you can (less resistance). Use graphite where the axles touch the wheel center. We made a tool that used the spun each wheel in a Drexel while the other held sandpaper to make each wheel slick.

UncleDirty
01-10-2013, 03:12 PM
Here's the cars that my dad and I built back in '72 or '73. His car was alot nicer, but I won with mine. My dad used .45 slugs for weight, I remember my car was a little too heavy so he had to drill them a little.

ariscus
01-10-2013, 04:36 PM
When I made mine back in scouts about 20 ish years ago, we went with standard wedge design, myself nor my father were artistic whatsoever so we went for speed. It was always as narrow as possible, and we drilled holes all the way threw and near the front axle, and glued in lead weights so as to not add any drag. Painted it smooth, then waxed it. Then went to town on the wheels and axles. Lots of jewelers rouge, and Emory paper. I spent hours on those wheels and axles. I won several years in a row. It was simple but fast.

c_mccann
01-10-2013, 05:49 PM
Run the wheels on a drilpress, use it like a lathe and emery cloth the tires til they are smooth. The wheel nails polished and graphite dust on the wheel hubs. My buddy glued washers on his and it worked- but ugly as heck..

03protege
01-10-2013, 06:23 PM
The fastest one I build when I was a kid used the flat weights on the botom of the car and was shaped like a door stop and that's what we called it it was a winner and fast too

YES^^ make that sucker as low and flat as possible also and extra weight add to the rear. Make sure you hit the maximum weight allowed. I would have the car overweight then drill out some lead on race day as the judges weight the cars in. Get your car in the ballpark by using the post office scales.

Only 3 wheels touch the ground (less friction)

Make sure it rolls straight (again less friction on the rails of the track)

We would have stickers over the outsides of the wheels and the insides would be filled with graphite.

I was part of a pretty big cub scout group and while I never won we were always one of the top finishers. A lot of it comes down to who gets the faster lane of the track.

Also you may do good ditching the standard kit and using a heavier wood.

03protege
01-10-2013, 06:28 PM
These are the flat weights that all the tops cars were using.

http://www.scoutstuff.org/skin/frontend/enterprise/bsaretail/images/s.gif

http://www.scoutstuff.org/bsa/crafts/pinewood-derby/accessories/derby-flat-weights.html

They actually stopped making them so one year we had to rip the weights out of an older car.

expatriated
01-10-2013, 07:26 PM
We're currently building our car for this year. We've won best in show but never the speed trophies.

Several books say to have the weight as far back as possible so that the weight continue to "fall" at the end of the track, since the track curves and flattens at the bottom. The argument being that the farther the weight is back, the car continues to fall(i.e. go fast) longer than the other cars. But some argue that the weight should be a bit more forward than this.

Anyone who can articulate the physics explain where the weight should be?

Also--who's got a good, simple procedure for polishing the axles?

03protege
01-10-2013, 08:04 PM
Also--who's got a good, simple procedure for polishing the axles?

just put the nail tip in a Dremel and use that to turn it up against a rag with polishing compound

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa62/03protege/IMAG0372_zps99e3cfbb.jpg

Here is my trophy for 2nd place alternate, essentially 5th place. I was happy considering there was around 100 cars to start. I looked for the cars but couldnt find them

Lynnhowlyn
01-10-2013, 09:09 PM
This site has got more information than you'll ever need.
http://www.derbytalk.com/
My two boys have their Pinewood Derby races this weekend. Doing two cars at the same time is a bit of a ball buster.

Our last years car is also in this post as well. http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=134663

Another site with LOTS of Pinewood Derby resources ... and depending on your local rules, some are legal, and some are a bit "over-the-line".

www.maximum-velocity.com

crazytrain
01-11-2013, 03:46 AM
Thanks for all the replys guys.

You guys have some great cars! :3gears:

Congrats to you older guys helping the younger one do it. :thumbup:


YES^^ make that sucker as low and flat as possible also and extra weight add to the rear. Make sure you hit the maximum weight allowed. I would have the car overweight then drill out some lead on race day as the judges weight the cars in. Get your car in the ballpark by using the post office scales.

Only 3 wheels touch the ground (less friction)

Make sure it rolls straight (again less friction on the rails of the track)

We would have stickers over the outsides of the wheels and the insides would be filled with graphite.

I was part of a pretty big cub scout group and while I never won we were always one of the top finishers. A lot of it comes down to who gets the faster lane of the track.

Also you may do good ditching the standard kit and using a heavier wood.


The car has to be made with the wood provided with the kit. Grafite lube is allowed, the total weight of the car allowed is 5 ounces.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

We have to follow BSA rules.

Car Dimension Rules
•The overall length of the car shall not exceed 7 inches.
•The overall width of the car shall not exceed 2 ¾ inches.
•The car must have 1 ¾” clearance between the wheels.
•The car must have 3/8” clearance underneath the body so it does not rub on the track.


Derby Car Weight Rules
•The car shall not exceed 5.0 ounces.
•The official race scale that is used at car check-in shall be considered final.


Car Modifications Not Allowed
•The official pine wood block must be used. The block may be shaped in any way that is desired.
•Official BSA wheels must be used. The wheels may not be cut, drilled, beveled or rounded. You may remove the seams and imperfections from the wheels.
•The axles may be altered, polished and lubricated.


Other Pinewood Derby Race Rules
•Once a car passes inspection and is entered into the race, only race committee members can touch it.
•If the car loses a wheel, or is otherwise damaged, the racer shall have 5 minutes to make repairs.
•Each car must pass inspection by the official inspection committee before it will be allowed to compete.
•The Inspection Committee has the responsibility to disqualify those cars that do not meet these rules.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

As of right now, I think we are going to go with a tow truck theme this year. I want him to really get into it this year so he will want to join scouts and compete next year for a chance to win. This year as a guest he will get a ribbon for participating but will not be able to actually win since he is not a scout member. I have a few days off coming up so we will build it then and have it ready with about an other week to tinker with it. I'll post up a pic when it's complete. :)

mooman
01-13-2013, 09:52 AM
Pics fro my boys race this weekend.232204232205232206232207

The silver truck won 3rd. Place for design in the automotive category.
This is the last year for me to help build two cars at the same time.

James E
07-02-2013, 10:35 AM
I thought I'd revive this old thread 'cause I dug out my son's PWD cars and took a couple of pics.

The first is his car from this year. He went nautical:

http://carphotos2.cardomain.com/images/0016/01/49/16261094_large.jpg?v=1

And the second reminds me of the recent thread about Dads helping too much. This is a perfect example. This is my son's first PWD car from when he was a Tiger. Obviously, I gave him a hand with it. You can be content in the fact that my work was recognized for what it was and we got no trophy.

http://carphotos2.cardomain.com/images/0016/01/59/16261095_large.jpg?v=1

bigbarf48
07-02-2013, 10:39 AM
Most important LET THE KID BUILD IT. There's nothing more pathetic than a winning car you can tell was built completely by a 40 year old man that just had to beat all the 7 year olds. It wit win your kids any friends either

James E
07-02-2013, 11:09 AM
Agreed and this has been a topic of discussion before. But, some Dads (like me) have to learn it the hard way.