View Full Version : 7.5ft foot cabinet door slightly warped, help?


Makoto
09-02-2013, 10:15 AM
Hey guys I recently built some cabinets in my garage and I decided to go with a floor to ceiling 2x2x8 cabinet for the corner. Everything turned out great but my door (which is a 3.4" maple sheet) kind of kicks out at the top and the bottom on the outside. I've considered using magnets to suck in those ends but I'm not sure if they'd be strong enough.

Is there a clever way to straighten this door out? This morning I thought about getting something that runs the height of the door and screwing it to the door like a strap to pull in those corners which are kicking out.

Am I making sense? Its my first cabinet build so I'm sure there is more to it than this. Its not that bad and I can push in the corners without much effort but figured someone here had to have a remedy for this situation.

http://www.digitalawesome.net/vault/garage/cabinets_1.jpg

thanks!

Jbullfrog
09-02-2013, 10:40 AM
Attach a frame on the inside.
Cut a sheet of plywood smaller an the opening, then glue and screw it to the inside of the door.

Install a 1x4 frame around the perimeter an inch in from the hinge and 3" from the opening, you could either install sheleves or a hanger for your jacket.

Duker
09-02-2013, 11:01 AM
Another method if the hinge side is ok you could cut a dado or a couple of saw kerfs the length of the door for a piece of 3/16" or 1/4" angle iron that you could then screw into the wood to pull it straight. You could line it up closer to the edge to use a magnetic catch plate and backer for a handle.

If the hinged side is also bowing then a frame is about the best way to pull the whole door square but at that length your stiles of the frame still could bow.

Another way is to install some cleats the length of the door to straighten it out but the thickness needed not to bow would kill some depth inside if you have shelves.

Jim B
09-02-2013, 11:29 AM
If you add a frame you will have to assemble it to the door panel working on a flat surface like an old door. Clamp the assembly to the flat surface and then use glue and nails or screws. It still may warp some. I had the same problem with my 8' tall cabinet doors. They were constructed by building a frame and attaching an MDF panel into a dado in the back of the frame. The flatter the surface I assembled them on the better they came out.

CNGsaves
09-02-2013, 11:36 AM
Trying to clarify . . . . you have solid MAPLE door that is 2' x 2' x 8' . . ???

Why such a high dollar wood for garage door??

I would repurpose that maple to build a couple 4 ft coffee tables for the house!! ;)

Rebuild the door for that storage space out of MDF with some framing, and if necessary couple strips of angle iron for skeleton.

jhelrey
09-02-2013, 11:48 AM
It says Maple Sheet, so plywood.

Average_Joe
09-02-2013, 12:05 PM
Like the others said, I would attach a slightly smaller piece of plywood to the inside of the door, glue and screw. Just make sure its bowed in the opposite direction.

zcar751
09-02-2013, 12:12 PM
Actually it said "mable sheet":lol_hitti but since I can't spell, I understood.:beer:

I would try rare earth magnets top and bottom but you may still want to rip a couple of 1" lengths of the 3/4 plywood, stack and glue them together so you have a 1.5" by 3/4 piece of plywood. Then screw it on the inside of the door as close to the edge as possible.

Slednut
09-02-2013, 12:20 PM
You could try putting something like a small piece of 2x4 under where there is no gap and clamping the gapped area to the cabinet. Check it once in a while until the gap is gone.

I like using melamine, itís cheap, easy to clean, I donít have to paint it and if a door is damaged I just cut a new one.

In your photo it looks like there is a step up in front of your work area leaving a very small place to stand. If this is the case it would be very uncomfortable to do any work at the bench.

NUTTSGT
09-02-2013, 12:23 PM
Trying to clarify . . . . you have solid MAPLE door that is 2' x 2' x 8' . . ???

Why such a high dollar wood for garage door??

I would repurpose that maple to build a couple 4 ft coffee tables for the house!! ;)

Rebuild the door for that storage space out of MDF with some framing, and if necessary couple strips of angle iron for skeleton.

The cabinet is 2x2x8 not the door. The door appears to be 2x8x3/4" and made out of maple plywood.

I think you need a frame on the outside of the plywood to help try to hold it straight. If it has multiple shelves, you put a few extra magnetic catches on each shelf.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liberty-Heavy-Duty-Magnetic-Catch-with-Strike-C080X0C-W-P/100149442#.UiTJLdLVBBo

Toolfool
09-02-2013, 12:29 PM
Split the door into two 48" tall doors with three adjustable hinges per door.

Makoto
09-02-2013, 12:30 PM
In your photo it looks like there is a step up in front of your work area leaving a very small place to stand. If this is the case it would be very uncomfortable to do any work at the bench.


Yeah, its not optimal but thats why the bench is so high. Its enough room to stand but when I build the real bench around the air compressor I'm gonna have to pay special attention to making sure its still comfortable to work at.

I don't know why they put that dumb step there, the whole garage would be better off if they just had it flat. but alas, this is not our dream home or my dream garage it'll just have to make do for now :)

I'm going to try and get a piece of that metal strapping with the holes in it, screw it to the top corner, push the middle of the door outward, and screwing the bottom of the strap to the door. If that can hold the bow it'll be fine for my purpose. :beer:

djjsr
09-02-2013, 12:36 PM
Install roller latches at the top and bottom. There's several different styles so if you're not familiar with them just google "roller latch" and look at the images. They are spring loaded and will straighten your door unless the warp is rigid.

Here's an example of one type that's readily available. It's really inexpensive and it works. Nicer ones are available.

http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL1059/4393681/18297072/407489477.jpg

machine_punk
09-02-2013, 12:44 PM
I'd take a 7-foot 2x4, and sculpt it a bit with a jig saw or band saw (like wooden version of the old refrigerator door handles), cut out a handle, round over all the visible edges, then screw it onto the front of the door (2" side to the face of the door) with screws from the back side. This will give you support to that side of the door and a handle to open the door with.

tcianci
09-02-2013, 12:50 PM
The first thing you want to do is check the cabinet itself to make sure that the case was not skewed during installation. Use a 6 foot level and check the plumb of the cabinet face on both the hinge and strike sides. This will tell you if the face of the cabinet is plumb and flat. If it's not, then you're trying to bend a possibly flat door to fit a not flat cabinet. If the cabinet is good, attach a long turnbuckle on the inside of the door from the hinge side, diagonally across the door to the offending corner. Space the actual adjusting part of the turnbuckle off of the inside of the door with a couple of small pieces of 1x stock so that the adjuster is 3/4 of an inch off the door. Then adjust the turnbuckle till the door flattens out.

Zeke
09-02-2013, 12:51 PM
This (http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-to/qa/fix-warped-cabinet-door.aspx) shows how to straighten a door. I use a 1 x 3 vertical rib on the inside of the latch side. AL angle suggested above would work.

Makoto
09-02-2013, 01:31 PM
I like the turnbuckle idea. I'm also using this for the external handles

http://www.lowes.com/pd_245507-76633-89009_0__?productId=3598782&Ntt=melrose+bar+cabinet&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dmelrose%2Bbar%2Bcabinet&facetInfo=

I'm hoping that since that piece is over 2 ft I could use that as the external reinforcement.

turbowoodworker
09-02-2013, 03:24 PM
Build proper rail and stile door using the plywood as a flat panel. Door that tall should be made with center stile, therefore two flat panels.

Woody610nb
09-02-2013, 04:34 PM
What type of hinge and how many? Like turbo said, rail and stile doors are easier to control. A piece of 3/4" ply is always going to bow.
You should use European hinges and at least 3, but better is 4. The center two can be adjusted out so the top and bottom of the door hits first and the center locks into a latch.

Makoto
09-03-2013, 07:55 AM
I'm using the 4 dollar lowes euro style hinges. They've been tricky to install but they don't require drilling into my door. I'm going to try kicking out the center hinge like woody suggested to see if that helps. If all else fails I'll just build a metal frame for the inside of the door to keep that puppy straight :)

Makoto
09-06-2013, 08:22 PM
I realized I was trying really hard to not do the job the right way so I took a couple steps back.

I removed all of the shelves and cut enough off to make clearance for the new inner frame.

http://www.digitalawesome.net/vault/garage/cabinet_2.jpg

I then framed up a perfectly square frame using 1x4's and mounted it to the door on a flat surface. It appears to be all flat now. I don't see how the top can kick out now with two rigid 1x4's running the length of it.

http://www.digitalawesome.net/vault/garage/cabinetdoor_2.jpg

Here is the door stained with the handle I'm going to use mocked up.

http://www.digitalawesome.net/vault/garage/doorstianed.jpg

I'll post pics when it gets hung tomorrow. The thing is pretty hefty now but looks a heck of a lot better and I have 7 shelves on the inside.

Andybull
09-06-2013, 08:59 PM
You'll need a lot more hinges to carry all of that weight. I was in the cabinet manufacturing business for 39 years, the longest door we manufactured was 54".

CNGsaves
09-06-2013, 09:32 PM
+1 to use a full-length piano hinge to support all that weight.

LOVE the improvements you've made on door. That in-door shelving will be perfect since the door swings out against the wall. Only improvement I'd recommend is adjustable shelve height.

Good luck finishing it out. You can't buy anything that nice.

Makoto
09-06-2013, 10:17 PM
You'll need a lot more hinges to carry all of that weight. I was in the cabinet manufacturing business for 39 years, the longest door we manufactured was 54".

Yeah I learned my lesson on the big door thing. I'm probably going to use 4-5 of the euro hinges. The frame didn't add much weight to the door, it was already pretty hefty, and the 3 hinges did fine.

I won't ever try to make a big door like that again, though, I think it'll look cool when its all done but its been a headache for sure :)

Andybull
09-10-2013, 06:43 AM
It's not the shelving weight added, it's the weight the shelves will carry. Add 4 more hinges.

Steevo
09-10-2013, 08:37 AM
You can use an aluminum edge pull on that door to straighten it up, along with a couple more hinges:

http://www.orangealuminum.com/garage-cabinets/garage-cabinets.html

JakeKohl
09-10-2013, 07:48 PM
I would make an exterior handle out of some steel or aluminum c-channel to straighten the vertical non-hinge edge. You may have to build a whole frame or remake it using a traditional construction door (designed to not warp with rails, styles, and a floating panel) if that doesn't do it.

Makoto
09-14-2013, 12:29 PM
I got her done fellas. Ended up using 2 cabinet roller catches and a big magnet on the bottom corner with 5 euro style hinges. I'll put another couple cabinet catches up high later on just to make closing feel a litter nicer.

thanks for all the feedback guys!

http://www.digitalawesome.net/vault/garage/cabdoor_finished.jpg

http://www.digitalawesome.net/vault/garage/cabdoor_inside.jpg