View Full Version : Does anyone use line wrenches that AREN'T Snap On?


eschoendorff
01-26-2006, 10:25 PM
Okay, there is a lot of tool-brand loyalty out there. Some of it is well deserved and the rest of it can be argued. But the strongest argument for Snap On comes with flare wrenches (line wrenches) and people will swear up and down that if you are not using Snap On, that you will surely round off nuts, loose your hair and remain infertile for the rest of your natural life.

I do not own any Snap On line wrenches. In fact, I own the Craftsman Professional and have used them with 100% success so far. So, are there any others that feel strongly about line wrenches that aren't Snap On????

Discuss....

iiibdsiil
01-26-2006, 10:31 PM
I'll tell ya one thing, the Snap-on ones work great :D

In all honesty, I use them so little. Probably one of the biggest wastes of money in my box. Although, I did use a cheap set once that expanded and wouldn't do it's job. It was probably made in China though.

kblazer87
01-26-2006, 10:37 PM
I have both Craftsman regular and a set of SK full polish that I like and use whenever called for. Both do the job equally, but the SK are a lot prettier.
Mike

z28toz06
01-27-2006, 06:38 AM
I have s et of craftsman professional. Never had a problem rounding any nuts off.

kartracer55
01-27-2006, 08:22 AM
I own 3 snap ons an SK and a regular craftsman. I dont use them at home that often which is why I never bought a whole set. I do use SK's ALOT in school and they show no signs of wear... Like them better than the snap ons in terms of comfort too

Jim

dink
01-27-2006, 08:47 AM
Refresh my memory.....what are line wrenches again :headscrat

Roadster
01-27-2006, 09:57 AM
Refresh my memory.....what are line wrenches again :headscrat

Line wrench = Flare nut wrench

Used for tightening/loosening flare nuts at line connections. Specially designed to turn flare nuts without stripping.

dink
01-27-2006, 10:23 AM
Ohhhh okay....I have Craftsmen

chevy302dz
01-27-2006, 10:55 AM
Craftsman Pro good
SK Good
Regular Craftsman Bad

kgwld1
01-27-2006, 11:12 AM
Have both snap on and mac both work great.

...dave
01-27-2006, 12:26 PM
i've actually had good luck so far with regular Craftsman, and an el-cheapo (emergency, only store open) 3/8" one... and most of my work is on cars whose brake lines were last worked on in the early 1960s. i do go through a LOT of PB Blaster, though. One of these days i'll probably invest in the SK set.

...dave

pl_silverado
01-27-2006, 12:32 PM
I had a set of craftsman metric ones, but using them was hell. I have since bought a set of snap-on metric line wrenches, and they work like a charm. I have only needed to use SAE ones a handful of times, but i wish i had the snap-on sae set. One day, i just cant justify $ 160 for something in only use a handful of times per year.

Thumper
01-27-2006, 02:34 PM
I have a full set of Snap-on metric and SAE. I have the old 3 piece set of Craftsman line wrenches that still get used. I also have some Cornwell crowfoot line wrenches that work well too.

SuperKid
01-27-2006, 04:57 PM
I own a set of Craftsman, and I use Snap-On ones at school. After using them both, the only time I've rounded a fitting was with the Snap-On. But, to be fair, someone tried using pliers on the fitting before and rounded it a little already.

krooser
01-27-2006, 08:25 PM
Matco...

stimpy
01-27-2006, 09:17 PM
bought my set of snap-ons , after having a set of sears ( 80's) round off nuts on me , best investment I bought , use them for tight bolts where a ratchet won't fit or a box wrench , I have to buy a set of metric ones now ...

l_bilyk
01-27-2006, 09:24 PM
Mine are ultraPRO from UAP. I wish i knew who made them

MarkH
01-27-2006, 09:50 PM
Wrights with occasional Cornwells. Somebody has to be different.

Canadian Charlie
01-28-2006, 07:31 AM
My metric line wrenches are Snap On and my SAE line wrenches are Grey which I bought from Canadian Tire back in the 80's.

Cross the border and get a set

kartracer55
01-28-2006, 02:06 PM
I have a set of snap on crowsfeet in line wrench style... does that mean I can join the snap on flare nut wrench club now? Can I can I huh?!?!?!?

lol

Jim

iiibdsiil
01-28-2006, 03:15 PM
I have a set of snap on crowsfeet in line wrench style... does that mean I can join the snap on flare nut wrench club now? Can I can I huh?!?!?!?

lol

Jim

Welcome to the club!

pl_silverado
01-28-2006, 04:12 PM
i have a set of those crowsfeet too, in metric and sae, and i have yet to use them...

Tx Firefighter
01-28-2006, 06:39 PM
My Snap-On line wrenches have the flare nut on one end and an extra thick open end on the other end.

Here's a picture off their website.

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/OBJECTS/48400/48371.JPG

They work very well, much better than the Craftsman (non professional) ones they replaced.

knucklehead
01-29-2006, 10:33 AM
My Snap-On line wrenches have the flare nut on one end and an extra thick open end on the other end.

Here's a picture off their website.

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/OBJECTS/48400/48371.JPG

They work very well, much better than the Craftsman (non professional) ones they replaced.

all my wrenches are snap-on. i use this same set as well. i used to have problems opening the ends of 1/2" snap-on open end wrenches whole turning cylinder base nuts on harley motors. my dealer showed me the line set wrench with open end on 1 end. it is 50% thicker than a standard open end & can take more abuse. very high quality & as a bonus they also work great on line fittings. LOL

Fast Orange
01-29-2006, 11:08 AM
I've had and tried just about every brand and style of line wrench over the years-almost any of them will do the job when what you're working on is new and shiny.When you're dealing with an older,rusty piece,the Snappies work the best-they're wider in the contact area,thicker walled and just plain get a better grip on the fitting.Plus,with one size per wrench,you only need one set for most jobs.

George :3gears:

Uncle Buck
01-30-2006, 10:03 AM
I have full sets of Cman in standard and metric, full standard Mac line wrench set, S/O crow foot line wrench set and a few other odds and ends brands in various sizes thrown into the mix. It has been my experience that one seems to perform as good as another so long as the pedigree of the tool is not questionable, ie.. USA only.

just_me
02-15-2008, 09:50 AM
Well, I've just learned a lot about line wrenches, after a cheapie rounded off a brake line fitting.

There are significant differences between brands, btu it snot "good quality" vs "bad". Its unique patented designs to avoid rounding.

Two manufacturers have patented designs that grab and turn the flats, not the corners. This allows 50%-100% more torque without damage. These have curved sides to the wrench. The two are Snap on (flank drive) and SK (sure grip).

Craftsman professional is in the middle. They wave their hands about similar designs, btu are inconsistent. I have tried several time sand have also not been able to see one for real in a store. So I hesitate to claim much here.

The rest - well made or poorly - are regular flare nut wrenches with a true hex shape. They are much better than open end wrenches, but they are a step down - a big one - from the Snap-on and SK.

Unfortunately the Snap-on wrenches are VERY costly, and the SK better, but still pricey.

But, IMO, worth every penny.

G

wrenchr
02-15-2008, 10:06 AM
Okay, there is a lot of tool-brand loyalty out there. Some of it is well deserved and the rest of it can be argued. But the strongest argument for Snap On comes with flare wrenches (line wrenches) and people will swear up and down that if you are not using Snap On, that you will surely round off nuts, loose your hair and remain infertile for the rest of your natural life.

I do not own any Snap On line wrenches. In fact, I own the Craftsman Professional and have used them with 100% success so far. So, are there any others that feel strongly about line wrenches that aren't Snap On????

Discuss....

Does anyone use line wrenches that AREN'T Snap On?

No why would you ask???:headscrat:headscrat:headscrat
:lol_hitti

milkovich
02-15-2008, 10:10 AM
+1 Craftsman Pros. Have done all the brakes on my old cars with them not rounded off any yet. The old regular craftsmans would round off brass fittings like they were designed to.

danski0224
02-15-2008, 10:14 AM
I have a set of standard Craftsman, bought before the Professional equivalent existed... at least not at the Sears store in my neighborhood... never shopped the Big Book... and the Internet didn't exist yet.

Didn't like it.

Bought Snap-On.

Much, much better.

dxdexter
02-15-2008, 10:22 AM
My SAE set is from the 1960's (Snap-on Canada) and my metric set is a Chinese special bought for a few bucks.

Snap-on are fantastic and the cheap ones are complete garbage. They round off everything that is the least bit tight.

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z102/dxdexter/wrenches.jpg

strizzy
02-15-2008, 10:26 AM
he two are Snap on (flank drive) and SK (sure grip).

Craftsman professional is in the middle. They wave their hands about similar designs, btu are inconsistent. I have tried several time sand have also not been able to see one for real in a store. So I hesitate to claim much here.

Umm, Craftsman Pro = SK.

SK is the supplier for the full polished wrenches.

ImportTuner
02-15-2008, 10:31 AM
I have the SK and Husky sets both in metric and SAE ... never had any problems with either ... :)

Brandon_Lutz
02-15-2008, 10:34 AM
I used the Craftsman Professional line. So far so good. I'd like to get Snap Ons, but I really can't justify it as I haven't had any problems with what I have so far.

DavidtheDuke
02-15-2008, 10:51 AM
Apart from precise machines (maybe), the best reason I like the SO's are because of the huge offset (helped BIG on a hard to get to slave cylinder line). But I've only otherwise used my dad's line wrenches, and he basically has ever brand you could think of in a big pile

arthur1920
02-15-2008, 11:02 AM
one of the few apps I really like to use Snapon for. However, I also have craftsman and a n o name.. I can think of at least one fitting on my car that I really need to use the no name for, no the fitting isn't messed up, the no name just does better there. The snapon is a tad too tight for that fitting.

arthur1920
02-15-2008, 11:05 AM
Yeah,
I really think the open/box is the way to go...and the ones that have a box and "speed wrench" (snapon) on the other side are just StOOPId

jimvannoy
02-15-2008, 11:14 AM
I have a Mac set and a Craftsman set. Got them all back in the early 80's. I broke a Craftsman once. The Mac set has been fine.

Jason_D
02-15-2008, 11:18 AM
I have a MAC sae set & an Evercraft (Balkamp/Napa) metric set & SO Crowfoot Flarenut(MM) wrenches. none of them have ever rounded a nut.

krusty the clown
02-15-2008, 11:20 AM
i had sk's.......they spread. now i have snap on sae and metric at work. i have a set of cornwell's at home i got used cheap. they're ok, i only use them occasionally.

just_me
02-15-2008, 11:42 AM
Note that not all SKs are "sure grip" either, or their marketing literature does not mention it for all part numbers. SK's full polish metric 9 x 11 does specify, though.

I do like the two craftsman pro sets I bought - one ratcheting and one stubby combo. Figures. I like SK a lot.

thnks.

Umm, Craftsman Pro = SK.

SK is the supplier for the full polished wrenches.

goodfellow
02-15-2008, 12:21 PM
Note that not all SKs are "sure grip" either, or their marketing literature does not mention it for all part numbers. SK's full polish metric 9 x 11 does specify, though.

I do like the two craftsman pro sets I bought - one ratcheting and one stubby combo. Figures. I like SK a lot.

thnks.

I have snap-on flare nut wrenches for the tough jobs. I have cheapies in my road box and they work, but they have only been used on new fittings. The snap-ons are always used on the older corroded stuff.

Jononon
02-15-2008, 02:29 PM
I have a Gearwrench (non-ratcheting) metric set, which I bought when my opportunity to borrow Snap-ons dried up.

The Snap-ons are nearly 5x the price of the Gearwrenches, at local prices :spit: Even the US price differential would, for me, rule out the Snap-on tools.

Are the Snap-ons better ? Possibly, I would be willing to consider that they might be more durable, but I don't use them every day, or even every month, and the Gearwrenches certainly don't slip on, or chew up, the fasteners.

Two manufacturers have patented designs that grab and turn the flats, not the corners. This allows 50%-100% more torque without damage. These have curved sides to the wrench. The two are Snap on (flank drive) and SK (sure grip).

The Gearwrenches also feature curved drive faces - 'Surface Drive Plus'.

strizzy
02-15-2008, 02:34 PM
Note that not all SKs are "sure grip" either, or their marketing literature does not mention it for all part numbers. SK's full polish metric 9 x 11 does specify, though.

I do like the two craftsman pro sets I bought - one ratcheting and one stubby combo. Figures. I like SK a lot.

thnks.

Just so its clear, SK is the supplier for the fully polished LINE wrenches.

Hawk231
02-15-2008, 08:57 PM
I wonder how these would hold up.

http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/V8-8811.html

I've never heard of them before. Someone buy a set and let me know how they work.
:lol_hitti

rsanter
02-15-2008, 09:14 PM
I have the snap on and they fit the nuts great. I have the Cman regular and they have done well but you can tell they do not fit as well. I also have the snap on crowsfoot set that has come in remarkably handy many times.
I also used someones Mac line wrenches one time and they seemed to be good as well

bob

joenero
02-16-2008, 02:32 AM
I actually would use C-man pro over SK just because the SKs I've used had a looser fit then the newer c-man pros, even though they felt "tougher." Matco's are pretty good too, never had an issue with that set.

BadBloodRacing
02-16-2008, 04:26 AM
I use Craftesman line wrenches with good results, but than again 98% of my tools are Craftsman as I can't see spending the extra money on S.O., Mac. or any other "truck" brand.

justinking060310
02-16-2008, 07:33 AM
I have both sets of the Craftsman Pro's - Never had a problem with them.

le6920
02-16-2008, 10:34 AM
I have a set of these Bonney wrenches and they work fine. I must admit I don't use them very often though so I don't know if they'd stand up to everyday use, but I think they would.

http://i29.tinypic.com/33pdcnl.jpg

jhn9840
02-16-2008, 10:54 AM
Got a Craftsman sae & metric set from either the 70's or 80's in my main box and another old set that just says China on them in my roadbox. Guess I am just lucky never had a problem with any of them.

jhn9840
John

Fedwrench
02-16-2008, 02:10 PM
Yes, many people use Non Snap on line wrenches but when they damage a fitting, have to cut the hose off to use a 6 point socket to get the screwed up fitting off, or replace the wheel cylinder, brake caliper, power steering whatever, or other part that didn't really need to be replaced but now has to because of a damaged fitting, they learn the error in their ways and obtain Snap on versions as soon as possible.:)

le6920
02-16-2008, 02:15 PM
Yes, many people use Non Snap on line wrenches but when they damage a fitting, have to cut the hose off to use a 6 point socket to get the screwed up fitting off, or replace the wheel cylinder, brake caliper, power steering whatever, or other part that didn't really need to be replaced but now has to because of a damaged fitting, they learn the error in their ways and obtain Snap on versions as soon as possible.:)

the kool-aid is with this one.:spit:

eschoendorff
02-16-2008, 02:52 PM
Yes, many people use Non Snap on line wrenches but when they damage a fitting, have to cut the hose off to use a 6 point socket to get the screwed up fitting off, or replace the wheel cylinder, brake caliper, power steering whatever, or other part that didn't really need to be replaced but now has to because of a damaged fitting, they learn the error in their ways and obtain Snap on versions as soon as possible.:)

This is precisely why I started this thread. There are some people who truly believe that only a Snap On line wrench is capable of turning fittings without stripping and/or destroying them as well as other components.

I would like to hear from real-world users who do NOT use Snap On line wrenches. I have had decent luck with my Craftsman pros, but I have only needed them a few times. What about the folks who use them everyday? What if the only tool truck that stops by is a Matco tool truck - or an S*K truck???? Somehow, I just cannot believe that Snap On is the only company capable of making a workable line wrench....

swgray
02-16-2008, 04:20 PM
This is precisely why I started this thread. There are some people who truly believe that only a Snap On line wrench is capable of turning fittings without stripping and/or destroying them as well as other components.

I would like to hear from real-world users who do NOT use Snap On line wrenches. I have had decent luck with my Craftsman pros, but I have only needed them a few times. What about the folks who use them everyday? What if the only tool truck that stops by is a Matco tool truck - or an S*K truck???? Somehow, I just cannot believe that Snap On is the only company capable of making a workable line wrench....


I've never bought flare nut wrenches. I've never had to cut a good usable line to replace a damaged fitting. Its usually the other way round. The line is crap and a new line comes with fittings anyway.

Fedwrench
02-16-2008, 04:23 PM
Ok, let me try this again. As a young teenager I used Craftsman raised panel flare nut wrenches (there wasn't the professional line back then) and Proto versions. The Protos were the combination Flare on one end with an open end on the other. The Craftsman spread a little, became loose on fasteners which led to rounding. I also broke a couple. However, the price was right and the warranty was easy. I never had a problem with the Proto versions.The Proto versions are still kicking over 30 years later but, they're SAE so they're not seeing much use these days.
In college I got a MAC set through the Votech tool program. They were very pretty and I really liked the feel of the wrench beams and the 8x10mm was really handy. However, I had problems with their 18mm spreading and rounding power steering hose ends on racks. About that time, the only tool truck visiting the dealership was Matco so, I got flare crowfeet and some Matco line wrenches. I didn't care for the thin profile on the Matco wrench beams as it tended to leave a nice crease in my hand if applying lots of pressure. The crowfeet were a great improvement but, I later found out that the way the wrench is beveled for easier attaching to the fastener actually reduces surface contact area and the 18mm spread. About this time, I surveyed what everyone else was using in the shop and what worked for them. Most were using Snap on. After searching for bargains, I came up with Snap on flare crowfeet, open end flare combination, and traditional line wrenches. Why is the Snap on flare wrench superior? It just is. For one thing, each size wrench is just the right heft and weight to it. The flare ends are machined like their sockets for off corner engagement of the fastener. The wrench ends are angled slightly sharper than others for improved access. Any beveling for faster fastener engagement doesn't reduce surface contact area. Lastly, whatever steel they use (must be comparable to the price of gold) doesn't spread.
Can you get by with a different brand of flare wrench? It depends on how often and how hard you use it. In a profession where time is money, you can't afford to have your tools let you down or cause you additional work.
This is just my experience but, after using Craftsman, Proto, Mac, and Matco flare wrench products, I prefer Snap on. To me Snap on makes the best #2 phillips screwdriver tip (but that's another thread) and flare nut wrenches. :thumbup:

Uncle Buck
02-16-2008, 04:42 PM
Look, you just as well stick a fork in this one, for the tried and true Snappy users /believers that is going to be the only answer you get; then you will get the feedback from the guys like me that have every brand mix from Snap-on to Plomb to the despised Cman's and I have no complaints against the service I have gotten out of any of them including the Cman, this will just be as it is!

wilbilt
02-16-2008, 09:25 PM
This is precisely why I started this thread. There are some people who truly believe that only a Snap On line wrench is capable of turning fittings without stripping and/or destroying them as well as other components.

I would like to hear from real-world users who do NOT use Snap On line wrenches.


I have Snap_On long combos. I would use nothing else in a bread-and-butter environment.

For line wrenches, I prefer the SKs. Krusty says his spread...mine never did. They have a good balance between the bulk of the Snap_On and the weakness of the Cman raised panel.

The SKs are shorter than the Snap_Ons. This can be good, depends on the situation.

RPH
02-17-2008, 11:21 AM
SK and never had a problem with them. And some of the apes at the shop really torque the fittings down on the machines.

Nikolai_V
02-19-2008, 04:36 AM
Can I chime in with an outside opinion. I work on old vehicles, worse than that old 4x4s from a wet coastal climate (for fun no less). I use a set of double ended King Tony flare nut spanners, have done for the past 4 years. Even had to use a cheater bar on one. The result - that good old taiwanese steel has held up just fine. nice thick (and deep) walls, grip rusted/seized banjo bolts no problem (even without flank drive). And hey. if its really seized and your tempted to spend XXX.xx on Snap-On rather than risk your inferior :) tools then penetrating oil is your friend :). Failing that, propane torch to take account of differential expansion of dissimilar metals....

Just my NZD$0.02 (worth USD$0.16 at the moment and rising :P) might equal cheaper S-O?

mulepackin
02-19-2008, 08:37 PM
At the risk of overworking a pretty well worked thread; I have used regular Craftsmans a fair amount (no not everyday). There are a lot of hydraulic fittings on our farm and ranch equipment and something is always breaking, leaking by, or needing rebuilt, in addition to airlines on the semi, and the usual fuel lines, standard brakes, etc. So again, a fair amount of use. My Craftsmans are older (pre Pro-line), and they have done everything we've asked of them without buggering up fittings. I view these as specialty tools, and I don't have any problem buying my specialty tools from Snap-On, or any other manufacturer that I think will provide the best bang for my buck. Just as an aside, I did get a set of HF flare wrenches once, I was reminded of making sand candles as a child in school, thats how poor the castings were. No worry about rounding or wrecking fittings though. The wrench would've broken first.

russlaferrera
02-19-2008, 09:51 PM
I have Snap-On, S-K, Craftsman, Bonney, and yes Harbor Freight (the crowfoot style). All work great.

Spookrider
02-19-2008, 10:24 PM
S&K good as any thing else out there. It is not quite Snap-On but not Craftsman.

Hawk231
02-20-2008, 08:31 PM
You could have had this set, and what a deal. :headscrat

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=330211896718&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=014

Cheap at twice the price.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00942013000P?vName=Tools&cName=Mechanics+Tools&sName=Wrenches&filter=Brand%7CCraftsman%5EType+of+Wrench%7CWrench +sets

mojorissin
05-22-2008, 06:21 AM
if you had snap on flank drive plus you wouldn't even need line wrenches . so thats just a waste ..
you needed them because your regular wrenches just bugger stuff up .

Hawk231
05-22-2008, 06:33 AM
Umm, no, there is a proper tool for every job.

SpiderGearsMan
05-22-2008, 06:42 AM
around here most flare nuts crumble when touched
on our 30k service , we used to use the brake flush machine - cars with 30 thousand miles on them , already half of the brake bleeders were seized

RickP330
05-22-2008, 07:35 AM
S&K here. Been using them 20 some-odd years with good success. HOWEVER, when I grow up I wanna set of snappys LOL
Rick

64merc
05-22-2008, 08:58 AM
I just found an old Bonney "12 point" line wrench. It has 1 1/8 on one end and 7/8 on the other. Kind of a weird combo of sizes isn't it??

Anyway, it is a little thick and heavy, but that's what makes it cool.

eschoendorff
05-22-2008, 10:22 AM
if you had snap on flank drive plus you wouldn't even need line wrenches . so thats just a waste ..
you needed them because your regular wrenches just bugger stuff up .

been drinking the Kool-aide?

billymade
05-22-2008, 10:34 AM
I have the Craftsman raised panel line wrenches but I think they stopped making them (discontinued, they all went on clearance at our store); I can't remember rounding anything with them, though. The new craftsman pro sets are priced pretty reasonably but I would assume the snapons would probably fit the fastener better if you do allot of brake/line work.

Lightning
05-22-2008, 11:57 AM
You could use flank drive plus wrenches on flare nuts if you do not have flare nut wrenches. The flank drive plus allows for much more torque compared to traditional open end wrenches. The problem though is that the serrated jaws will mar soft metals.

paramudduck
05-22-2008, 04:16 PM
Proto, Wright,and Cornwell with a few odds and ends of Mac, SK and Snap On.

The only times I have rounded a line fitting have been with the Snap On wrenches.
Line on a Kenworth with over one million miles on it. Heated and pliered off then replaced the entire assembly.

Moose-LandTran
05-22-2008, 04:19 PM
i have german Elora ones. i think they're better than the Snap-on ones. they're a very tight fit and i've never rounded a fitting with them. for me, they're the best you can get. they're much cheaper than Snap-on too.

Jay H 237
05-22-2008, 06:03 PM
I have 2 sets of metric and standard of the C-man raised panels and haven't had any problems yet.

(home mechanic, not a professional)

wilbilt
05-22-2008, 07:51 PM
I have 2 sets of metric and standard of the C-man raised panels and haven't had any problems yet.


Tent stakes are what those are good for.

They do break in the hard clay soil here, though.

Uncle Buck
05-22-2008, 08:47 PM
I have a set of these Bonney wrenches and they work fine. I must admit I don't use them very often though so I don't know if they'd stand up to everyday use, but I think they would.

http://i29.tinypic.com/33pdcnl.jpg

That is my favorite set of line wrenches, I would like a full set of them, though I think the 6pt style is better suited to the real stubborn buggers! :thumbup:

Uncle Buck
05-22-2008, 08:50 PM
been drinking the Kool-aide?

I think Merkava has brought him in for support! :pimpflash

PoorOwner
05-22-2008, 09:08 PM
ooh, 12 point flare wrenches....
I have had to buy a 12 pt box end wrench and cut it open like a flare because I was trying to tighten the line between the compressor and turbine housing, it only have 1" to swing!!

Rickochet
05-23-2008, 11:55 AM
6 Point Snap On-- I have used the rest, but chose the best in the case. This is one area where Snap On truly shines!

JayL
07-18-2008, 10:59 PM
Is this a good price $34.99

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00942013000P

tks

Vinko
07-19-2008, 06:43 AM
Does anyone use line wrenches that AREN'T Snap On?

No why would you ask???:headscrat:headscrat:headscrat
:lol_hitti

I have a set of Proto. I've used them only a few times to work on my 1951 Buick. But then again, I'm not a skilled mechanic by any means and I imagine that if I working working as a mechanic or a serious enthusiast of cars, I'd think differently about getting a better set.

Besides using my dad's Snap On stuff, my first Snap On tools were a full set of SAE Combo wrenches that I bought from a mechanic who was retiring and a set of green Snap On drivers that I got as a birthday present about 15 years ago.

Junkman
07-19-2008, 07:55 AM
While working on my 1963 Chrysler, I had an assortment of Snap-On, New Britton, Proto, Herbrand, and Craftsman. I found that some fit better than another depending on the condition of the tube nut. I lucked out, and didn't round off any of the nuts, but there were a few that were so badly rusted, that the tubing just twisted. On those, it got a line replacement. The one "modern" Craftsman didn't fit any line nuts very well.

eschoendorff
07-19-2008, 07:56 AM
While working on my 1963 Chrysler, I had an assortment of Snap-On, New Britton, Proto, Herbrand, and Craftsman. I found that some fit better than another depending on the condition of the tube nut. I lucked out, and didn't round off any of the nuts, but there were a few that were so badly rusted, that the tubing just twisted. On those, it got a line replacement. The one "modern" Craftsman didn't fit any line nuts very well.

Would this be a modern raised panel or a modern full polish?

Cobra6
07-19-2008, 11:01 AM
For the $$$ - I like SK - especially if you don't use them every day -
But............
I got a set of Kobalt line wrenches before they changed the style 4 or 5 years ago - when they were made by JH Williams (polished chrome, good feel to them) - I tried to get several things when Lowe's changed their Kobalt line - they had some pretty good deals at clearance prices.

I got a pretty nice blue Kobalt two section stack-on tool box for about half price also.

wantedabiggergarage
07-19-2008, 11:35 AM
In the garage, we had Snap~on's and the Cra(p)sman (in this case) raised panel wrenches. Some of our customer base, brings things to you that they butcher (from not having the correct tools, don't use vise grips for everything).
After a break in a few years ago, we couldn't find the Snap~on ones. We has to use the Cra(I will let you finish), and saw them spread. We later that day found the Snap's (hadn't been stolen, luckly) after I ran home and brought back my JH Williams made Kobalts.
The Craftsman line wrench owner, took all his back and swapped them for the pro line. Which appear to be MUCH better quality (word on the net, was they thought SK made those).
As stated, I have my Kobalts for home (work fine and bought on closeout), but wanted some for my portable box. (could work on something that has been maintained, to something that is rusted in the field at my brothers farm). I picked up the Snap~on open end flare nut for that.

I think it all depends on if your working on your own stuff (since you maintain it) or other peoples abused junk.

kythri
07-20-2008, 07:37 PM
I've got the SAE and Metric sets of the Craftsman Professional, which I thought several people (both in this thread and others) have confirmed that SK makes them...

The work great, but it's not as if I use them a LOT...

JayL
07-25-2008, 10:42 PM
I have a Gearwrench (non-ratcheting) metric set, which I bought when my opportunity to borrow Snap-ons dried up.

The Snap-ons are nearly 5x the price of the Gearwrenches, at local prices :spit: Even the US price differential would, for me, rule out the Snap-on tools.

Are the Snap-ons better ? Possibly, I would be willing to consider that they might be more durable, but I don't use them every day, or even every month, and the Gearwrenches certainly don't slip on, or chew up, the fasteners.



The Gearwrenches also feature curved drive faces - 'Surface Drive Plus'.

I just ordered these in Metric. Amazon's price is the same as Sears 50% off + Tax but with free shipping. Not a bad deal.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000NI93SE/ref=ord_cart_shr?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00993021000P?vName=Tools

Soon when these tools start showing ROIs I'm getting snap ons too. :thumbup: