View Full Version : Pinstriping?


agoogol
07-23-2009, 01:43 PM
I have been admiring pinstriping quite bit on different cars at show, and would like to get ito it myself.

Where should I start?

drabe
07-23-2009, 02:41 PM
I've been pinstriping for a little over 6 or 8 months, there are a lot of good sites out there on this subject (Sketchkult, Rocky Burris, etc...).
Check out the HAMB and do a search on 'pinstriping', also look up Skratch and Unkl Ian they are the two most prominent 'stripers on the HAMB (although there are many others).

I studied the subject quite a bit before I even picked up a brush. I started practicing on a piece of glass (from an old storm door I had). Rocky has several 'drill sheets' that you can tape onto the backside of the glass and practice making straights, curves, etc...
I've 'graduated' to other things now though (I'll post some pics in an album soon).

I've been buying most of my supplies from Eastwood.com (just bought some 1-shot paints from them this week). Probably best to start with a Mack 0 or 00 brush but I recently bought a Kafka 0 brush and it quickly became my favorite (all of these are available thru Eastwood). If you sign up with them, you'll get email 'exclusives' like 10 to 25% off. You probably can't save that much by buying local (if you can even find a dealer locally).

I use mineral spirits for cleaning the brushes and '3 n 1' oil before storing them, but everyone has their own preference (I used what I had around).
You'll also need lots of paper towels (I prefer the blue ones) for clean up and wiping off mistakes.

I got to talk to Skratch a good while at the Lone Star Roundup this year while he was 'striping a '53 Chevy. I asked him how long he'd been 'striping and he said 'about 15 years', I then asked him how long it was before he didn't suck at it and he said '5 years'.
That being said, don't expect magic overnight and keep at it. You'll only get better with practice!

agoogol
07-23-2009, 04:18 PM
Thanks for the advice. I will browse CL and ebay as well, just in case. I have a steady hand at least, and do all trimwork painting around the house freehand, so at least I have tha goin for me. Thanks!

shovel
07-23-2009, 05:54 PM
I've been pinstriping for a little over 6 or 8 months, there are a lot of good sites out there on this subject (Sketchkult, Rocky Burris, etc...).
Check out the HAMB and do a search on 'pinstriping', also look up Skratch and Unkl Ian they are the two most prominent 'stripers on the HAMB (although there are many others).

I studied the subject quite a bit before I even picked up a brush. I started practicing on a piece of glass (from an old storm door I had). Rocky has several 'drill sheets' that you can tape onto the backside of the glass and practice making straights, curves, etc...
I've 'graduated' to other things now though (I'll post some pics in an album soon).

I've been buying most of my supplies from Eastwood.com (just bought some 1-shot paints from them this week). Probably best to start with a Mack 0 or 00 brush but I recently bought a Kafka 0 brush and it quickly became my favorite (all of these are available thru Eastwood). If you sign up with them, you'll get email 'exclusives' like 10 to 25% off. You probably can't save that much by buying local (if you can even find a dealer locally).

I use mineral spirits for cleaning the brushes and '3 n 1' oil before storing them, but everyone has their own preference (I used what I had around).
You'll also need lots of paper towels (I prefer the blue ones) for clean up and wiping off mistakes.

I got to talk to Skratch a good while at the Lone Star Roundup this year while he was 'striping a '53 Chevy. I asked him how long he'd been 'striping and he said 'about 15 years', I then asked him how long it was before he didn't suck at it and he said '5 years'.
That being said, don't expect magic overnight and keep at it. You'll only get better with practice!

Excellent post drabe!
I too, have toyed with this idea, but have hesitated to try it. Please post some pics of your work when you get time. Thanks for the info.

crashbumper
07-23-2009, 06:42 PM
I have a few friends that pinstripe, mostly on high end bikes and cars.

They compared it to skateboarding like this:

It's cheap to get into and looks easy, but requires years of practice.

drabe
07-24-2009, 08:34 AM
Thanks for the advice. I will browse CL and ebay as well, just in case. I have a steady hand at least, and do all trimwork painting around the house freehand, so at least I have tha goin for me. Thanks!

That's what convinced me I could do it, trimwork around the house.
I figured it couldn't be that different/hard!
The learning part didn't seem to take too long, but I can tell the getting good part will.
One interesting thing about it...I've always admired others pinstriping but since I've started I have noticed that I REALLY pay attention now. I'm always studying the lines and color combinations. The hardest thing sometimes is having a 'blank canvas' and seeing the finished product in your head before putting paint to panel.

drabe
07-24-2009, 08:45 AM
Excellent post drabe!
I too, have toyed with this idea, but have hesitated to try it. Please post some pics of your work when you get time. Thanks for the info.

Thanks Shovel, I didn't think my reply would be so long winded. I tried to consolidate most of what I've learned and applied.
I always looked at pinstriping as a 'black art' and you'd need to apprentice with someone to really learn it. To a degree that's still true, but with the internet the apprenticeship is online. Check out YouTube and you'll see all kinds of pinstripers on there. You learn a little something from everyone.

I've put a brush in the hands of my 18 year old son and my 9 year old nephew to give them the basics. Both seem interested but want instant results. Tough to explain to the 'want it now' generation that it takes time to learn this.

I've got a lot of pinstriping projects going on now, my son brought me his glove box door from his truck so at least he's impressed enough to trust me with it.
The wife has talked about me 'striping some of her purses and even shoes.

I'll get some pics up soon!

drabe
07-24-2009, 08:47 AM
I have a few friends that pinstripe, mostly on high end bikes and cars.

They compared it to skateboarding like this:

It's cheap to get into and looks easy, but requires years of practice.

At least with 'striping you can't get hurt!