View Full Version : What's the difference between a Tool Box and a Toolbox?


Merkava_4
10-06-2009, 01:42 AM
If you go to Google and enter in "Extreme Toolboxes," it will say,

"Did you mean: Extreme Tool Boxes." :mad:

Then you go on to Extreme's site and sure enough, they refer to their products as "Toolboxes."

I'm like what the frick? Somebody needs to call Mr. Webster and tell him this is the year 2009. :cool:

nissan_crawler
10-06-2009, 03:05 AM
it's toolbox, not tool box

Kevin54
10-06-2009, 04:54 AM
But if it is "toolbox" instead of "tool box" then why is it "tool chest" instead of "toolchest"?

I actually think tool box or toolbox are both acceptable ways of spelling it. It may also depend on geographic location as to the spelling

nissan_crawler
10-06-2009, 04:59 AM
But if it is "toolbox" instead of "tool box" then why is it "tool chest" instead of "toolchest"?

I actually think tool box or toolbox are both acceptable ways of spelling it. It may also depend on geographic location as to the spelling

show me a dictionary that lists tool box, and I'll retract my statement. Otherwise, it's toolbox.

nate379
10-06-2009, 05:04 AM
It's tool box.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/tool+box

Kevin54
10-06-2009, 05:13 AM
It's also toolbox.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/toolbox

nissan_crawler
10-06-2009, 06:02 AM
It's tool box.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/tool+box

negative. that's stating the origin of the word came from tool AND box.

The dot between refers to this:

"End-of-Line Division

The centered dots within entry words indicate division points at which a hyphen may be put at the end of a line of print or writing. Thus the noun pos·si·bil·i·ty may be ended on one line with:

pos-
possi-
possibil-
possibili-

and continued on the next with:

sibility
bility
ity
ty "

it doesn't mean it's two words.

Like I said, the preferred spelling is "toolbox". If somebody shows me something that says otherwise, I'll eat my words.

T56 Impala
10-06-2009, 08:44 AM
Is it really that big of a deal?

bchee
10-06-2009, 09:12 AM
if you look on ebay, does it search for both? That's the most important thing. You want to make sure you're getting every possible search match.

franzdom
10-06-2009, 09:24 AM
Sounds like some has sand in her ******.

wantedabiggergarage
10-06-2009, 10:03 AM
Tend to be both used, but what I figured years back, was it is a tool box, if it is a box for a specific tool (example, holds your circular saw). It is a toolbox, if it holds more then one tools (ratchets, wrenches, etc).

Merkava_4
10-06-2009, 02:00 PM
I just get sick to death of Google always correcting my search queries; even though the words I enter are perfectly fine.

Moose-LandTran
10-06-2009, 02:04 PM
Are you looking for a roll cab? Or a rollcab? :D

LostHSV
10-06-2009, 02:37 PM
This is not how I envisioned my first post here but I digress.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (vol. 2, pg. 3296) the word should be hyphenated which looks like this: "tool-box". The reason is that the word is a compound modifier construction. However most dictionaries have started to drop the use of hyphens with the result of conjoining the words without the hyphen. The newest edition of the Shorter Oxford dropped over 16,000 hyphens from usage.

Long story short, the proper spelling of tool-box is S-N-A-P--O-N.

Moose-LandTran
10-06-2009, 02:49 PM
Like I said, the preferred spelling is "toolbox". If somebody shows me something that says otherwise, I'll eat my words.


I hope you're feeling hungry.. :D

This is not how I envisioned my first post here but I digress.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (vol. 2, pg. 3296) the word should be hyphenated which looks like this: "tool-box". The reason is that the word is a compound modifier construction. However most dictionaries have started to drop the use of hyphens with the result of conjoining the words without the hyphen. The newest edition of the Shorter Oxford dropped over 16,000 hyphens from usage.

Long story short, the proper spelling of tool-box is S-N-A-P--O-N.

ddawg16
10-06-2009, 02:54 PM
I guess you could put it in the same context as bull shit vs bullshit.......one comes from a male cow.....the other is just BS.

arkangel06
10-06-2009, 03:40 PM
Its toolbox!

307WYLD
10-06-2009, 04:36 PM
Life & death kinda big deal? NO

Big deal as in words have proper spellings and meanings...YES

If someone can't communicate properly, why is it everyone else's problem to "interpret" what they mean? That is the whole point of having a defined language...so that ANY person who knows that language can communicate with anyone else who knows that language.

It's kinda like putting a Mac disc of software into a PC and then getting mad at the PC because it doesn't speak the language.

Or better yet, hooking a GM computer up to a Dodge engine and wondering why the fuel injection and timing won't work.

And yes, in both cases, both scenarios can be made to work...with ALOT of work and "interpretation" from one language to another.

Should you or anyone else have to do this to figure out what someone is saying?

Doesn't matter if it's an internet search engine (a quasi-artificial intelligence) or a person...communication only exists if EVERYONE is on the same page.

Is it really that big of a deal?

Torque1st
10-06-2009, 05:13 PM
I thought it was a droolbox... ;)

dr_clyde
10-06-2009, 05:54 PM
Frankly I've always thought of Tool Box as the handheld boxes that you can carry around, but toolbox as the roll cab and top chest style.

1Garageman
10-06-2009, 08:33 PM
dumbass or dumb ass?? Either way you get your point accross when you put that out there.

Torque1st
10-06-2009, 09:12 PM
I ain't no damn good at the English... But... I try to use one word when it is the name of something and two words when it is a description of something. That is just me tho and don't hold me to it because I am a dumb ass.

I never did very well in English or spelling in school. Thank GOD for the invention of spelling checkers and online dictionaries. English was unbelievably boring to a poor kid with ADD in the days before they even knew what it was. I only got a 21 on the English portion of the ACT test I took in high school and that was a LONG time ago. I really took a dump on that section.

A VERY useful program:
http://wordweb.info/

cwstevens92
10-06-2009, 09:30 PM
Search Tool Storgae and forget the "box"

franzdom
10-06-2009, 09:37 PM
I can't keep my mind off the "box" :lol_hitti

nissan_crawler
10-07-2009, 01:07 AM
I hope you're feeling hungry.. :D

Try again. A hyphenated word still isn't two words, plus his "reference" is 20 years old. Again, the modern preferred spelling is toolbox.

mik641
10-07-2009, 01:42 AM
who cares? get a life if you stress over a spelling of a word!

Justanoldguy
10-07-2009, 04:10 AM
Search Tool Storgae and forget the "box"

I seriously doubt that Tool Storgae will get you many results:beer:

Miter Wrench
10-07-2009, 08:33 AM
"I need a wrench from my tool box to work on my '66 Corvette Sting Ray. I need a wrench from my toolbox to work on my '69 Corvette Stingray."

It's just a theory...

speed bump
10-07-2009, 08:43 AM
Its like my Tech writing instructor said: it depends on how conservative an audience you are writing to. There are a lot of words that you have to decide which is your most important demographic. Personally I think the compound modifer version is the most gramatically correct, but to all but the most anal it doesn't matter. To the anal people align yourself with some random professional society and use their style guide to help you decide what you like.

LostHSV
10-07-2009, 08:46 AM
Try again. A hyphenated word still isn't two words, plus his "reference" is 20 years old. Again, the modern preferred spelling is toolbox.

Oxford Dictionary 5th Ed. (2002):headscrat

expatriated
10-07-2009, 09:03 AM
Oxford now says "toolbox".

As an aside, I was happy to see someone invoke Oxford (well done, LostHSV) as opposed to those dictionaries of questionable quality such as Webster's, Collier, and the like.

Personally, I would like to see something in English along the lines of the Dictionnaire de l'Académie française by L'Académie française. That way, we would have a definitive reference with which to consult, rather than resort to the dueling of mediocre college dictionaries, many of which are inconsistent even in their whopping 50,000 entries:lol_hitti. But until a similar organization exists for the English-speaking peoples, we should use Oxford as the definitive authority. (Click here (http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/?view=usa&ci=0198611862) to get yourself a copy.)

Frank Elson
10-07-2009, 11:58 AM
Apart from the fact that I spent the last 40+ years of my life working with words I can't believe I just wasted a few minutes reading this thread.

English is a LIVING language which means that it changes, like all living things, all the time.
That's why the Oxford brings out a new dictionary every few years, with some words missing and some new ones added.
Meanwhile - you speak it, you make up your own rules. No, seriously.

Snappy
10-07-2009, 12:36 PM
http://library.queensu.ca/webtrc/2007/11/28/teachers-tool-box-for-real-spelling/

The TOOL BOX is what it says it is: a “tool box”, a set of resources from which those who understand what the structures of English really are can select teaching and learning materials to resource their work. You have here a set of tools for establishing and consolidating your students’ journey towards the orthographical thinking and conceptual competence that bring spelling maturity.

Our task is to teach children HOW to spell! And that means how to go from what that word means to how that meaning is represented in writing.

The Tool Box gives you tools to achieve that end. A good craftsman needs a full set of tools at his disposal to achieve the result he wants. That does not mean that he must obligatorily use every tool in his box. He is selective and will choose amongst his tools what it needed for the task in hand.”…Melvyn Ramsden

Posted in New Resources |

Stuey
10-07-2009, 12:43 PM
Google bugs me too. I type in "smells like te" and it auto-completes "smells like team spirit." What the heck! It's teen, not team.

Also, go to google and type in "i like to" and see what it autocompletes. "why is" is also amusing.

nissan_crawler
10-07-2009, 02:20 PM
Oxford Dictionary 5th Ed. (2002):headscrat

Yep, which is the 1989 one with a few supplements added and stuck on a computer...

Moose-LandTran
10-07-2009, 02:26 PM
I don't care..

gsport
10-07-2009, 03:47 PM
i've never ever wondered about that but i do wonder why you park on a driveway and drive on a parkway... hmmmmm

rustyjeeps
10-07-2009, 11:13 PM
Whatever Dude.
http://www.race-dezert.com/forum/showthread.php?t=35125

redneckprofessor
10-08-2009, 12:08 AM
According to the Oxford English Dictionary (vol. 2, pg. 3296) the word should be hyphenated which looks like this: "tool-box". The reason is that the word is a compound modifier construction. However most dictionaries have started to drop the use of hyphens with the result of conjoining the words without the hyphen. The newest edition of the Shorter Oxford dropped over 16,000 hyphens from usage.



English is a LIVING language which means that it changes, like all living things, all the time.
That's why the Oxford brings out a new dictionary every few years, with some words missing and some new ones added.
Meanwhile - you speak it, you make up your own rules. No, seriously.

Sorry to do this, but I'm a professor of English, so you asked for it.

As it says in the Oxford dictionary (thank you LostHSV), the word is a "compound modifier construction." My 1959 Webster's dictionary doesn't even have an entry for "toolbox" because it was seen as a construction, like "gas station" or "dinner plate" which may or may not be listed in a certain dictionary by themselves. Curiously, though, my 1959 Webster's does have an entry for "toolmaker," with no hyphen.

At one time, the convention was to hyphenate compound modifier constructions, but there was an article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, I think, on the "death of the hyphen." Simply put, what we use to hyphenate, we now combine, like "software" or "jackass" (it used to be hyphenated).

As Frank Elson posted, language is always in flux. I remember certain rules that were drilled into my head that are now not enforced by writing instructors or even mentioned by English handbooks, like ending a sentence in a preposition. Now, if it sounds "weird" not to end in a preposition, then go ahead and end in a preposition. The rule against splitting the infinitive is on its last legs, too.

So . . . conventional use has the word as "toolbox," one word, but the convention is not old enough for it to be a steadfast rule, so you would not be "incorrect" to say "tool box."

Again, I apologize, and I return you now to posts about tools, garages, and beer. Carry on.

redneckprofessor
10-08-2009, 12:22 AM
Personally, I would like to see something in English along the lines of the Dictionnaire de l'Académie française by L'Académie française. That way, we would have a definitive reference with which to consult, rather than resort to the dueling of mediocre college dictionaries, many of which are inconsistent even in their whopping 50,000 entries:lol_hitti. But until a similar organization exists for the English-speaking peoples, we should use Oxford as the definitive authority. (Click here (http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/?view=usa&ci=0198611862) to get yourself a copy.)

Ah, yes, the "L'Académie française"! That has been around since 1635 and was set up to "resolve debate," if you will, debate over the standards of poetry, plays, art, measuring standards, currency, and so on. They are still around to this day, and famously attempt to take stands against the intrusion of foreign (usually English) words into the French language.

For example, they took stands against "weekend" and "internet" being used when there were no French equivalents or the French words were not used. They give people more appropriate French words to be used instead, to retain the integrity of the French language. Not always effective, though, due to the popularity of the English words.

Good point made on their authority, especially given that editors for the Oxford dictionary like to show how "current" and "correct" they are by using faddish words. Debatable, though, on whether Americans would listen. I know I wouldn't.

:bounce: