View Full Version : car alternator can be used to generate a 110 v output


jonepark
01-01-2010, 10:07 PM
Hi,
I was searching for this but I didn't found anything.Does anyone know if a standard car alternator can be used, or modified, to generate a 110 v output? Does the output voltage depend on the rotational speed?Any help is appreciated.
Thanks.

rsanter
01-01-2010, 10:22 PM
if memory serves me, an altenator is a constant voltage, variable amperage device.
you can get a small engine (like a briggs) and a couple of batteries and an inverter.
the altenator will keep the batteries charged and the inverter will make your 110v

bob

HotRodKush
01-01-2010, 11:21 PM
The voltage, at least in part, is regulated by the voltage regulator on the alternator. Even without it though, I don't think it'll put out much more than 14 volts. Like rsanter said, you can get a power inverter that'll convert the 12-13V automotive system to a 110v source.

Torque1st
01-02-2010, 12:47 AM
When alternators had external regulators there were kits to make 110VDC from an alternator. 110VDC can be used to run universal motors (the ones with brushes). I have no idea what is available today.

Inverters are the way to go nowadays.

CarterKraft
01-05-2010, 02:47 PM
I don't have the particulars but the answer is yes, I think,

A car alternator is putting out AC current, it is rectified to DC by the diode bridge.

As to how to do it, don't know. You could always just buy one ready to go, premierpower is a company that sells them, I think.

dipper
01-06-2010, 02:17 PM
buy an inverter for the power you need. No reason to re-invent the wheel here.
Ebay is your friend, search 12vdc 110vac inverter

HOTFR8
01-06-2010, 04:05 PM
Hi,
I was searching for this but I didn't found anything.Does anyone know if a standard car alternator can be used, or modified, to generate a 110 v output? Does the output voltage depend on the rotational speed?Any help is appreciated.
Thanks.

if memory serves me, an altenator is a constant voltage, variable amperage device.
you can get a small engine (like a briggs) and a couple of batteries and an inverter.
the altenator will keep the batteries charged and the inverter will make your 110v

bob

This is what I would suggest and use the alternator to charge a decent battery then run the inverter from that battery. :thumbup:

lawfarm
01-06-2010, 09:15 PM
If you pull the voltage regulator (whether internal or external), you will get variable voltage depending on the speed at which you spin the shaft. As noted above, at the right speed, you can generate 110V, but it is DC (as noted above). That does work with some motors, but not with most modern electric motors. Also, anything with variable speed (variable speed trigger or adjustment) will burn out almost instantly.

krooser
01-07-2010, 12:37 AM
Alternators produce ALTERNATING CURRENT by design... the rectifiers/diodes convert it to DC. And yes they used to offer 110V AC kits for automotive alternators.

sberry
01-07-2010, 09:29 AM
Yes, they used to make a voltage regulator bypass, make AC power from an alt.

Tom McDermott
01-07-2010, 11:46 AM
The alternator usually produces 3-phase AC power, which is rectified by a 6-diode bridge. The battery filters the resultant ripple (which is quite small [something like 6%] with a 3-phase full-wave rectfier). A couple of problems:

1) The diodes are rated for 12 DC output. If you try to up the DC voltage a lot, they are likely to suffer breakdown. you would need different diodes.

2) If you try to produce AC, it won't be 60 hertz. The frequency will vary with the shaft speed of the alternator, and I think it's up in the few hundred hertz to maybe one thousand hertz range at normal engine speed.

Using an inverter is by far the easiest solution. They are mass produced and thus relatively cheap compared to 30 years ago.

-- Tom

veno
01-08-2010, 01:47 PM
They make these new fangled tings called house hold generators.. gasoline powered and all.. man are they cool..

add gas start it up.. and the generator makes either 240 volts 60hz single phase or 120 volts 60hz single phase or a combination of both.....

holy smokes.. what a great Ideia.... when the gas engine dies?? the generator is still there.. and you install a new one.. or get on you bicycle and spin the generator to 1600 rpm:lol_hitti

BackAgain
01-11-2010, 08:41 AM
Power inverter is definately the way to go. I built my own generator with an 8hp engine, a 180 amp 12v truck alternator, and a 3000w inverter. I also have a deep cycle battery so I can use some power when the engine isn't running, and I have electric start with a remote. :) Best generator ever! It will surge 6,000w for 5 seconds, which is WAY more than a 3kw standard generator can surge. I can also use it to jump start/recharge anything 12v.

I did; however, spend a ton of money to build this thing. I could have bought a generator off the shelf for cheaper...but I like mine better. :thumbup:

HOTFR8
01-11-2010, 04:09 PM
Power inverter is definately the way to go. I built my own generator with an 8hp engine, a 180 amp 12v truck alternator, and a 3000w inverter. I also have a deep cycle battery so I can use some power when the engine isn't running, and I have electric start with a remote. :) Best generator ever! It will surge 6,000w for 5 seconds, which is WAY more than a 3kw standard generator can surge. I can also use it to jump start/recharge anything 12v.

I did; however, spend a ton of money to build this thing. I could have bought a generator off the shelf for cheaper...but I like mine better. :thumbup:

The FUN is in the building and the result is when it does what you want it to do :thumbup: