View Full Version : 18' x 8' Garage Door


gto65goat
09-13-2006, 08:58 AM
Finally got my permit to build my 24' X 24' garage in A.A County, Maryland.:bowdown:
My plans call for an 18' long X 8' tall garage door.:)
Would like it to be of steel construction, and insulated.:drool:
Looking for recommendations, and suggestions?:beer:
Thank you!!

twostory
09-13-2006, 09:30 AM
I am putting a 18 x 11 (tall) door on my garage. I have not decided yet, but will probably buy a door at lowes. I have to buy a "commercial" door, as mine is too tall. They do not make residentail doors 11 ft high.

The Wayne Dalton (18 x 11) will cost around $2,100. This is a sectional, raised panel door. No windows, and the insulation value is R10.96. This is the Thermomark 5150 model, the 5200 model is R14.8 (cost about $300) more. Since I live in Georgia, R10.96 is enough for me.

Home Depot /or/ Lowes will probably have the best price, if you install it yourself. I replace my last home's garage door, it is not a tough job, probably take you 1/2 day or more to install a 18 x 8 door.

I was looking for a 18 x 8 ft door, but decided to up size (I have a 12.5 foot ceiling) Lowes sells another brand of door "Amarr" (I forget the exact spelling), but this door looked better built than the wayne dalton. The cost was around $1,000. The Coplay doors are home depot okay, but I think the lowes door are slightly better quality, and the price was slightly lower.

Goodluck...

shopking68
09-13-2006, 10:14 AM
I have a 16x10 on one side of my shop, its insulated and a very nice door.

I payed about $1200 for it installed :)

Just remember the bigger the door you have, the less wall space you get...

JMURiz
09-13-2006, 11:10 AM
What style of door are you looking for, 'normal' or carriage style?
I got an Amarr series 3000 door, steel inside and out with insulation R-15...it was $$ but worth it for the look and function.

boiler7904
09-13-2006, 11:16 PM
Raynor Doors (http://www.raynor.com/index.cfm) makes several lines of good overhead doors that meet your needs. Don't know what pricing would be for you.

cw_racefan
09-14-2006, 07:09 AM
For a basic insulated door, Gadco also makes one. Check with 84 Lumber in Arnold. I got my 16x8 from them, but I know Gadco (the doors they carry) makes an 18' one.

I see you downsized from your initial plans? Was that because of the county and variances, etc?

Craig

gto65goat
09-14-2006, 09:18 AM
I certainly appreciate everyone's reply.

Should anyone else wish to chime in, please do so.

Craig - you have a good memory. Yes, I did have to scale back the plans, and it was because the variance did not fly. (I was trying to use as much yard as I could...but a couple of neighbors fought it, and I was denied).:lol_hitti

However, when I received my 'Denial Notice'...as did all the neighbors within 175' of my property lines...it was mentioned that while my 32' long X 24' deep garage / workshop had been denied, the Variance Committee saw no reason why a scaled down version of the garage could not be constructed.

So I knocked off 8' of length, by re-doing my AutoCad drawings, presented the plans to the AA Co. Permits Dept., and I walked out an hour later Permit in hand.:bounce:

red vette mike
09-14-2006, 10:16 PM
Finally got my permit to build my 24' X 24' garage in A.A County, Maryland.:bowdown:
My plans call for an 18' long X 8' tall garage door.:)
Would like it to be of steel construction, and insulated.:drool:
Looking for recommendations, and suggestions?:beer:
Thank you!!
My garage addtion has 4 9'x10' openings. I wanted 'carriage style' swing out doors. I got some quotes for doors with a custom welded metal frame and the price was out of sight. I faricated the doors using cedar 2x4 studs, reinforced on the corners with steel bracing; used 'HardiPlank (concrete based planking) on the front-nailed and glued; luan on the back-screwed and glued; 4 heavy hinges per side; insulated with r13 batt and Tyvek in between. Ordered glass this week (20"x36")-will look like a 6 pane window. The doors look really nice. They are real heavy so good hinges are a must. The cost was really low but the amount of labor was really significant. The only thing 'cheap' about this addition was my labor.
Good luck.
Mike

gto65goat
09-15-2006, 07:05 AM
My garage addtion has 4 9'x10' openings. I wanted 'carriage style' swing out doors. I got some quotes for doors with a custom welded metal frame and the price was out of sight. I faricated the doors using cedar 2x4 studs, reinforced on the corners with steel bracing; used 'HardiPlank (concrete based planking) on the front-nailed and glued; luan on the back-screwed and glued; 4 heavy hinges per side; insulated with r13 batt and Tyvek in between. Ordered glass this week (20"x36")-will look like a 6 pane window. The doors look really nice. They are real heavy so good hinges are a must. The cost was really low but the amount of labor was really significant. The only thing 'cheap' about this addition was my labor.
Good luck.
Mike

Mike,

Sounds like a lot of work, but I'm sure it had to very satisfying once you completed it. I can just imagine how "heavy" those doors must be.

I really like the idea of using Tyvek.

John

Old Moparz
09-15-2006, 10:21 AM
I haven't been on here in awhile, but spotted this topic & wanted to add to it. There is a big difference in price going from a residential door to a commercial door. I believe the largest size residential door is 16'x 8' & anything above that, (Length & Width) will require different hardware & likely be a commercial door.

Another drawback, is there will be less styles to pick from with commercial doors. Most I've seen look like factory warehouse doors, but maybe there are a few that will look nicer. I have two 16'x 8' doors on my garage with high lift tracks to get them up higher, & close, to the ceiling. I did this after getting quotes on 16'x 10' doors, prices were actually triple on the extra 2 feet.

gto65goat
09-15-2006, 02:32 PM
I haven't been on here in awhile, but spotted this topic & wanted to add to it. There is a big difference in price going from a residential door to a commercial door. I believe the largest size residential door is 16'x 8' & anything above that, (Length & Width) will require different hardware & likely be a commercial door.

Another drawback, is there will be less styles to pick from with commercial doors. Most I've seen look like factory warehouse doors, but maybe there are a few that will look nicer. I have two 16'x 8' doors on my garage with high lift tracks to get them up higher, & close, to the ceiling. I did this after getting quotes on 16'x 10' doors, prices were actually triple on the extra 2 feet.

Hi Bob,

I just got off the phone with a Clopay Seller/Installer here in the Maryland area, that offers a residentail 18' X 8' door.
The price I was given for their top of the line door, Insulated 2" Steel door and 3/4 horsepower Belt Drive Lift Master, was: $2400 Installed.

I also plan into looking at other door suppliers, such as Raynor which was suggested by another forum member.

Apparently, there are several manufactures that build residential doors in the size I want (18' long X 8' tall).

What I did find out, was that in order for me to have a full 8' of door clearance...I need to have at least 15 inches of header for the Clopay door. I would imagine the others are very similiar. This is doable for me.

Thanks for your reply.

nova65ss
09-15-2006, 03:33 PM
All door manufacturers make an 18 x 8 or higher for that matter in res steel. The biggest thing to look for is the thickness of the exterior steel. 24 gauge is about the best you will find in res. and 2" thick. Make sure for 2400 it has another layer of steel on the inside similar to a regular entry door.

You can get by with less headroom if you go to double low headroom track but the price goes up a little and the door doesn't run quite as smooth. If the building isn't up just make sure you have at least 15".

Jimmy

JohnZ
09-15-2006, 04:23 PM
Mine are 18' x 8' steel/foam/steel sandwich residential doors, made by Taylor Door in West Branch, Michigan; have been up for six years, very happy with them. The far door is in front of my lift bay, and is set up as a high-lift (12' ceiling) so I can open it all the way with the lift up at full working height. :thumbup:

gto65goat
09-18-2006, 07:38 AM
All door manufacturers make an 18 x 8 or higher for that matter in res steel. The biggest thing to look for is the thickness of the exterior steel. 24 gauge is about the best you will find in res. and 2" thick. Make sure for 2400 it has another layer of steel on the inside similar to a regular entry door.

You can get by with less headroom if you go to double low headroom track but the price goes up a little and the door doesn't run quite as smooth. If the building isn't up just make sure you have at least 15".

Jimmy

Jimmy,

Thanks for the reminder concerning 24 guage exterior steel.:lol_hitti

gto65goat
09-18-2006, 07:41 AM
Mine are 18' x 8' steel/foam/steel sandwich residential doors, made by Taylor Door in West Branch, Michigan; have been up for six years, very happy with them. The far door is in front of my lift bay, and is set up as a high-lift (12' ceiling) so I can open it all the way with the lift up at full working height. :thumbup:


John Z,

Now that is a nice looking garage.
Wish I had that kind of room to build one like it.

John G.