View Full Version : How much should I be spending on a concrete slab


jam92102
02-25-2010, 05:16 PM
Ok, first please forgive my ignorance. I have no knowledge on the difference between concrete and cement. What I'm wanting to do this summer is build a good size shed (around 14x14 or 12x12) and I want it on a concrete/cement foundation so I don't have to worry about animals underneath.

First off what should my floor/foundation be made of and how much roughly should I pay for something like this? I'll be building the shed myself but I have no clue about how to do a foundation. I have to recognize my limits (which is sometimes hard for me to do, lol).

Any round park figure you can give me would be great as I would have no idea if I'm over paying. Thanks all for the help!

Jim

bazzateer
02-25-2010, 05:26 PM
Cement is the grey powder than 'glues' the stones and sand together to form the concrete. If it's just a shed then you should be OK with a 4" slab. Cost? I'm afraid I have no idea in your area.

Zrexxer
02-25-2010, 05:27 PM
Ok, first please forgive my ignorance. I have no knowledge on the difference between concrete and cement.
There are four components in concrete:

1. Water
2. Fine Aggregate (sand)
3. Coarse Aggregate (gravel) and
4. Portland Cement

You can't build anything with cement alone.

1969
02-25-2010, 05:36 PM
Why don't you just run the slab yourself ? BTW, if you think you a building 14x14 is adequate , build it 1.5 or 2 times that size. Providing you have the room and $$$$. If there is sod now where you hope to build, cut and remove. Lay down 3" or 4" of crushed gravel or screened pit run, water and compact same. But some 2"x6" plank, build perimeter of slab , level and brace. Inside your form put down heavy poly from end to end, side to side. Calculate cubic yards of concrete, call redimix, pour same. Have on hand a friend or two, screed top of the pour . If you want a real smooth finish, rent a power trowel, if not, leave it a semi rough finish. While the concrete is curing, cover with poly and keep damp. Perhaps some of this is beyond your expertise, but non of the above is very difficult. Good luck.

1969
02-25-2010, 05:43 PM
I forgot to mention you might want to put screen in the slab, helps with cracking. Depending on the size, 4" to 6" deep will be fine. I f you intend on having a light or receptacle in the bldg, stub out a short piece of PVC to accommodate the wiring.

ddawg16
02-25-2010, 07:42 PM
A 14'x14 slab apx 4" thick will take a little over 7 yards of concrete.

On 'average', concrete is running around $80-100/yard deliverd....

Most trucks will hold up to 10 yards....if you order less than a full load, the cost per yard goes up....

So...I would design a pad that would use about 9.5 yards...pay for a full truck.

I would also suggest finding someone to do the floating for you....otherwise, you will be a very unhappy camper trying to break up 9 yards of concrete....

Truth is....if you have never done it...pay someone to do it for you the first time.....it really is one of those things you don't want to screw up...making repairs is NOT easy.

Having said all that....figure $1500-2000 if you pay someone to do it.

nate379
02-25-2010, 07:48 PM
Where are you getting 7 yards from?

14x14 slab 4" is ~3 yards.

14x14=196sq/ft 196/3=65 65/27= 2.4


Based on cost/labor here, you'd be looking at $600-700. Slab is small enough that you can do with with a helper without problems though. Just rent a bull float.

DHS
02-25-2010, 08:01 PM
Ya, I was thinking three yard would be a little extra.

RbrtAWhyt
02-25-2010, 11:37 PM
http://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete/howmuch/calculator.htm

jam92102
02-26-2010, 05:57 AM
I don't know guys. Sounds like a lot of work that you have to get right in order for it to last. I'm pretty comfortable with most stuff around the house but not something like this.

$700 sounds a lot better than $2000 but I want quality work. I'd rather build a small one car garage back there if I'm spending that much on the concrete.

Is there any other foundations that will last a long time and keep animals from getting underneath. Maybe spreading a lot of gravel and then building on treated lumber? I just don't want a family of racoons under there like I had last year! :)

pl_silverado
02-26-2010, 06:10 AM
Just pour the slab yourself, its pretty easy.

I've poured a number of slabs over the years, and they've all held up just fine. Last one as at my house, an 8'x8.5' x 6" deep for the hot tub, and a little walkway to it. Concrete came out to $ 350, used about 2.25 yards, and got it from the local place in a tow behind mixer i went and got myself, which was nice because i could just back it up to place and work at my own pace.

So dig it up, put in some forms, order the concrete, call some friends and get a case of beer and some pizza.

Nostraquedeo
02-26-2010, 07:14 AM
Yeah, pretty easy really. If it is a shed, the finish on the floor does not have to be perfect. You would only need around 3 yards. At $100 a yard, you are looking at $300 + 2x4's and wire mesh. Go down to a local sub-division being built and watch them pour.

bluesman2a
02-26-2010, 07:40 AM
Where are you getting 7 yards from?

14x14 slab 4" is ~3 yards.

14x14=196sq/ft 196/3=65 65/27= 2.4


Based on cost/labor here, you'd be looking at $600-700. Slab is small enough that you can do with with a helper without problems though. Just rent a bull float.

This is correct, I just had a 10X10 poured last week and it was a hair under 2 yards. My cost finished (including a small load charge) was $750. That also included a lot of extras like putting a crub around my shower area and aprons outside.

$700 sounds a lot better than $2000 but I want quality work. I'd rather build a small one car garage back there if I'm spending that much on the concrete.

$700 is a reasonable amount for a GOOD quality concrete finisher/material installed. The only thing that may change that answer is if you have to do something different in your area for getting below the frost line. I would think you could just do a 4" floating slab, but I don't even pretend to know about what you guys up north need to contend with for frost/thaw cycles.

mdoolittle
02-26-2010, 11:59 AM
A 14'x14 slab apx 4" thick will take a little over 7 yards of concrete.

On 'average', concrete is running around $80-100/yard deliverd....

Most trucks will hold up to 10 yards....if you order less than a full load, the cost per yard goes up....

So...I would design a pad that would use about 9.5 yards...pay for a full truck.

Very good advice.
Around here it's a minimum of 4 yards delivered or the they add a truck charge of $100.
Concrete will be one of your biggest costs. Do it right and plenty big the first time.

ddawg16
02-26-2010, 02:14 PM
A 14'x14 slab apx 4" thick will take a little over 7 yards of concrete.

On 'average', concrete is running around $80-100/yard deliverd....

Most trucks will hold up to 10 yards....if you order less than a full load, the cost per yard goes up....

So...I would design a pad that would use about 9.5 yards...pay for a full truck.

I would also suggest finding someone to do the floating for you....otherwise, you will be a very unhappy camper trying to break up 9 yards of concrete....

Truth is....if you have never done it...pay someone to do it for you the first time.....it really is one of those things you don't want to screw up...making repairs is NOT easy.

Having said all that....figure $1500-2000 if you pay someone to do it.

Fat fingers (and I forgot to divide by the thickness)

Actual answer 2.4197530864197530864197530864198 yards.....give or take a couple of inches....

Something else to consider....see if your local building supply sells by the yard....there is one about a mile from my house....they have the tote...hook it up to the hitch of a truck...they fill it up with a yard of concrete.....the place I use charges $130/yard...as long as you don't keep the tote more than a couple of hours...

3 trips and your done....

But my experience....if it takes more than 2 trips....better off ordering a truck....sometimes it's just cheaper than the PIA of other methods....