View Full Version : floating slab attached to foundation


tigmusky
08-26-2010, 07:35 PM
hi, all
Is there any to attach a floating slab ( my garage) to a foundation ( the house) Like a breeze way. I live in minnesota so frost is a issue.


thank you Daye

Nailbender
08-26-2010, 11:15 PM
Hi. I would have to know more of what you have there. Is money an issue? How old?

nehog
08-27-2010, 06:17 PM
The term 'floating' means something, it floats on the ground. Ground can move many inches with frost (depends on soil, temperatures, and other factors, but it moves...) The foundation won't move, it is below the frost line.

So tie the two together, and something has to give. The floating slab will move (up) with the frost, the foundation will stay in place, and oops...

Stuart in MN
08-27-2010, 06:49 PM
As far as I know, building codes in Minnesota won't allow a floating slab to be tied to a foundation. However, you're thinking about connecting the two with a breezeway and I don't know if that gets you around the problem or not. The garage will still move up and down with the seasons, which will put a strain on the connecting breezeway section.

It's probably a question for the building inspector. Here's the link to the Forest Lake inspections department, with contact names and numbers: http://www.ci.forest-lake.mn.us/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC=%7B67AB83BF-85E2-414F-B1B5-939ADD1392F2%7D There's also some code information online there; I took a quick look but didn't find anything specific to your situation.

mpraddict
08-27-2010, 07:01 PM
What are you trying to accomplish? Is this an existing enclosed garage slab that's sinking and you're trying to stabilize it? New garage slab and you're thinking it would be better supported on a foundation?

Gary S
08-27-2010, 07:15 PM
Around here no floating slab can be tied to a house. Anything attached to the house needs to have at foundation wall down at least 4 feet and a footer under that.
Like already mentioned, floating slab means just what it says. If you attach something floating to something solid, it will break and cause you more problems than you bargained for.

kbeitz
08-27-2010, 07:21 PM
Why not just let it float ????

toolmiser
08-27-2010, 08:07 PM
I'm over here in Wisconsin, and my house was built with a full basement, the garage was originally separate, but later attached with a breezeway (no foundation), then our home was annexed. I wanted to build an addition to the garage, and they said I needed to go below frost, so to keep them happy I did, because I was going to do the structure myself, and didn't want it to be examined with a microscope. I haven't had problems, but still think it was silly.

mpraddict
08-28-2010, 05:26 PM
I've seen frost heave concrete slabs. There's a good reason building codes require footings go below frost level.