View Full Version : Regulator


gmhill33
10-19-2010, 01:26 PM
I have the 3/4" copper about all done. What type of regulator would you all recommend?

Thanks,
Gary

Stephenw
10-19-2010, 01:35 PM
The Husky 3/8" regultor and filter available from Home Depot has worked well for me...

Filter (http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xi4Zarnk/R-100040942/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&catalogId=10053)
&
Regulator (http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xi4/R-100071386/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&catalogId=10053)

Run full pressure into your air system and use a regultor at each drop.

gmhill33
10-19-2010, 01:36 PM
The Husky 3/8" regultor and filter available from Home Depot has worked well for me...

Filter (http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xi4Zarnk/R-100040942/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&catalogId=10053)
&
Regulator (http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xi4/R-100071386/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&catalogId=10053)

Where would I put that in the 3/4" line?

Stephenw
10-19-2010, 01:39 PM
Put one at each drop, use a reducer.

gmhill33
10-19-2010, 01:41 PM
Put one at each drop, use a reducer.

Cool.

Thanks for the info.

Gary

larry_g
10-19-2010, 01:49 PM
Why do you need a regulator? Do you have a two stage/175 psi compressor? If your running a single stage compressor at 120psi or so then most tools will not need regulated air. Consider a regulator that is matched to the tool that needs it and only use it when needed. Educate yourself on what Cv means and use that to help you decide on the regulator you need to do the job for the tools you are powering with your air system.

If you have posted before what your doing in your shop, and the tools your powering, can you post a link to the post? If not then can you post the information here.

lg
no neat sig line

Steve in Mi
10-19-2010, 02:08 PM
A regulator for your entire system or for the point of use air regulation (on the drops)?

Maximum inlet pressure and regulator pressure range need to be considered/specified. For example you may find 3/4" regulators that have 125 psi as a max regulated pressure but can withstand 200 psi. inlet - if your compressor is 2 stage and pumping to 175 psi. you can pass this one up and look further for a regulator with a higher rating OR perhaps lower the system pressure and /or the cutout pressure to 125 psi. on your compressor.

I have a Wilkerson 3/4" regulator on my main system and then further regulate the pressure at the individual drops using 1/4" and 1/2" regulators of various namebrands. Watts, Fisher, Norgren, Johnson .....

Steve in Mi
10-19-2010, 02:15 PM
I see I waited too long to post. Probably have what you need already but I'll add a caution. If you do have system air at 175 then be sure the regulators you put in the line are rated for that pressure or more.

gmhill33
10-20-2010, 10:14 AM
Thanks to everyone for the replies. I have anther question. Can I come out of the are tank with a 3/4" pipe and go into a 3/8" regulator and then out of the regulator back into the 3/4" pipe with out loosing air pressure? Because if I can then I will just put my old regulator in line at the tank and then I won't have to worry about it since I don't really need to regulate the air at each of the drops.

Thanks,
Gary

larry_g
10-20-2010, 01:11 PM
Thanks to everyone for the replies. I have anther question. Can I come out of the are tank with a 3/4" pipe and go into a 3/8" regulator and then out of the regulator back into the 3/4" pipe with out loosing air pressure? Because if I can then I will just put my old regulator in line at the tank and then I won't have to worry about it since I don't really need to regulate the air at each of the drops.

Thanks,
Gary

The small regulator will become the limiting factor in performance. Once you start to flow air the pressure downline of the regulator will start to drop if the tool your using will flow more air than the regulator will. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.

lg
no neat sig line

W-Cummins
10-20-2010, 05:26 PM
The small regulator will become the limiting factor in performance. Once you start to flow air the pressure downline of the regulator will start to drop if the tool your using will flow more air than the regulator will. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.

lg
no neat sig line

This is simply not true _IF_ you use a quality regulator, a 1/4" ported model will easily out flow any home shop compressor. The Wilkerson R16-02-000 model will, at 90 psi, flow the whole output of my 20hp Quincy 390.

Here is the specs for their (R16) 1/4"-1/2" models

Specifications
Flow Capacity*
Port size: Flow:
1/4 71.5 SCFM (33.7 dm3/s)
3/8 80.5 SCFM (38.0 dm3/s)
1/2 88.0 SCFM (41.5 dm3/s)

Adjusting Range Pressure
0 to 60 PSIG (0 to 4.1 bar)
0 to 125 PSIG (0 to 8.6 bar)
0 to 250 PSIG (0 to 17.2 bar)

Maximum Supply Pressure 300 PSIG (20.7 bar)
Operating Temperature 32 to 150F (0 to 65.5C)
Port Size NPT / BSPP-G 1/4, 3/8, 1/2
Gauge Port (2 ea.) NPT / BSPT-Rc 1/4
Weight lb. (kg) 1.7 (0.77)

* Inlet pressure 100 PSIG (6.9 bar). Secondary pressure 90 PSIG (6.2


Even at 30 psi out the 1/4" model still flows 40 scfm and the 3/8" is OVER 100 cfm at 25psi with the light spring in it.

So unless you used many feet of piping at 3/8" to feed and exhaust a good 3/8" regulator it will work fine...

William....

djd99
10-20-2010, 06:29 PM
I have the 3/4" copper about all done. What type of regulator would you all recommend?

Thanks,
Gary

I'm running these in my shop with no complaints, just stay away from harbor freight regulator they leak something terrible.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200349695_200349695

larry_g
10-20-2010, 06:48 PM
Originally Posted by larry_g
The small regulator will become the limiting factor in performance. Once you start to flow air the pressure downline of the regulator will start to drop if the tool your using will flow more air than the regulator will. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.

lg
no neat sig line



This is simply not true _IF_ you use a quality regulator, a 1/4" ported model will easily out flow any home shop compressor. The Wilkerson R16-02-000 model will, at 90 psi, flow the whole output of my 20hp Quincy 390.

William
Reread what I said, it is 100% true. It has nothing to do with the compressor, or the quality of the regulator.

lg
no neat sig line

Torque1st
10-20-2010, 10:29 PM
Use a quick disconnect and plug the regulator into any outlet that needs a regulator for some task. Using a whole system regulator wastes all the energy it took to compress the air to the higher pressure. It is more economical to set the pressure switch on the compressor to ~25PSI over what pressure you need and let the compressor cycle with demand.

W-Cummins
10-21-2010, 01:16 PM
William
Reread what I said, it is 100% true. It has nothing to do with the compressor, or the quality of the regulator.

lg
no neat sig line

Yes your right, and I was wrong to say it was not true. Yes your statement is technically correct, but in this discussion, it also provides NO useful information.

Well on second though, maybe maybe it does..... IF he uses a 3/8" sized regulator (and it's a model R18) like he wanted to, and hooks up a jack hammer that needs 100 CFM to run, (to his maybe?? 20 scfm compressor) the regulator will produce a reduced output (97 scfm) for a few seconds before his tank runs out and the compressor pukes.
Of course if he had selected a R28 model regulator in 3/8" @ 162 SCFM there would have been no loss of performance :):)

Now if you want to provide useful information about sizing the regulator, its quality, style/type and the size of the compressor (the application) make a large difference. The differing performance of the many brands and styles of the regulators make a BIG difference, much larger than the size of the ports does in the case of a home shop application...

William.....