View Full Version : what is the best material to put on walls


yard_dawg
03-15-2007, 04:46 PM
was wondering if anybody had any good hints as to what to finish the inside walls with. seems sheetrock might get a little dirty,dont know. this is my first shop i'am building want to make sure i do it right the first time. thanks

yard_dawg
03-15-2007, 09:23 PM
that is what i'am going to do. just thought there were some good ideas out there. thanks

IDASHO
03-15-2007, 09:35 PM
Right now my cost on 7/16 OSB is cheaper than sheetrock...

So thats what Im doing! Pretty much a no-brainer there :bounce:

davidcalhoun
03-15-2007, 10:02 PM
DuraPlate. It has replaced FRP in a lot of truck beds

brownbagg
03-15-2007, 10:10 PM
why not plywood, pretty simple, pretty tough, pretty cheap and if you need to hang something, drive a nail

Vicegrip
03-15-2007, 10:58 PM
Plywood burns. Sheetrock is made from hydrated gypsum. When you heat it it resists heat by releasing the water bound up in the gypsum. It actually sweats out water and this prevents burning far more so than any of the treated plywoods or even cement board This chemical action also helps prevent the heat from penetrating and burning the wood structure behind it.

gahi
03-15-2007, 11:12 PM
If you just paint the drywall with a semi or high gloss paint, you should be able to clean it.

1320stang
03-16-2007, 12:48 AM
I'm thinking the bottom 4' will be Hardi Panel if I ever get my shop built.

trainer
03-16-2007, 10:42 PM
If you just paint the drywall with a semi or high gloss paint, you should be able to clean it.
thats exactly what I did.

I used Melamine paint. Basically a oil based, eggshell finish paint, designed for things like kitchen cabinets.

Seems to be holding up well, I've splashed water and dirt on it and it wipes off.

alpo
03-17-2007, 08:26 AM
I used OSB. Can't remember if it was 7/16 or 1/2 inch, though. Then painted it with some cheap white paint.

Vermaraj
03-19-2007, 01:54 PM
If money is no object, try this stuff:
http://magnesiacore.com/

can be machined at the joints and epoxied together. It will become seamless. It will not burn and its waterproof. costs about 3x drywall available 0.25 - 0.75"

dixie
03-21-2007, 12:29 AM
If money is no object, try this stuff:
http://magnesiacore.com/

can be machined at the joints and epoxied together. It will become seamless. It will not burn and its waterproof. costs about 3x drywall available 0.25 - 0.75"

Nice find! I can do the joint filling with bondo and a blade in no time. No clouds of dust without a taping to refinish the board. Looks great.

dixie
03-22-2007, 01:20 AM
Took another look at this magnesiacore site today and it does sound like the best thing to put on walls. Has anyone asked them for samples?

Vermaraj
03-22-2007, 09:15 AM
They have a link on their website for samples. I sent an email and received the samples a week later.

PAToyota
03-22-2007, 11:17 AM
This stuff would be great to use! http://www.alpolic-usa.com/

Cost prohibitive, though...

boiler7904
03-22-2007, 12:35 PM
This stuff would be great to use! http://www.alpolic-usa.com/

Cost prohibitive, though...

We had a presentation at work about a similar locally-sourced product a couple of months ago. Seemed like a great material for garage walls until I heard the cost. I want to say it was about $125 for a 3 x 8 or 3 x 10 sheet... and that was at a discounted rate.

kbs2244
03-22-2007, 12:46 PM
I haven't built it yet, but my plans for the new place are:
The guy putting in the slab will put in a 2 inch high curb all around the slab, except for the big door area.
The bottom 1 foot of the wall will be a strip of Polymax Board from these guys at www.teksupply.com. It is water proof and it will be culked at the bottom edge to the curb. (I dont plan to wash down anything, but slop happens.)
Next will come a 4 foot high row of white painted 3/8 plywood for strength and ease of fastening things to.
Then the top will be white, high strength, 1/4 inch peg board with the big holes. Again, for ease of fastening things.
The electric outlets will go at the seam between the plywood and the peg board.

rick2752
03-22-2007, 02:10 PM
Has anyone looked in using the 4x8 Hardiplank board? Cement fiberboard.

dixie
03-25-2007, 09:05 AM
I am sold on the magnesiacore board. It cuts and installs like drywall and I can bondo the joints so I don't need a taper and can do it all myself. Looks much simpler and easier to do than all the others. Even at three times the price of buying drywall (which is cheapest material available for walls) if I don't have to pay a taper to refinish it will save me a lot of time and money.

Quiksilver
03-25-2007, 09:14 PM
this stuff could be cool but I don't know about the fire ratings etc. would clean up easy, and they sell it at Lowes.
http://www.tuftexpanel.com/

dixie
03-26-2007, 10:52 PM
Are you refering to the fibreglass roof panels? This looks like a plastic material.

Quiksilver
03-28-2007, 04:18 PM
I was actually referring to the polycarb material. Polycarbonate is the material that they make bulletproof glass out of, this is also what they use to make "featherweight" eye glass lenses out of. Should be really strong and very resistant to cracking. I am thinking about using it when I get around to building a garage.

Vicegrip
03-28-2007, 05:45 PM
It is very strong ans easy to work with but it has some down sides. It is subject to hydrocarbon crazing and inbrittlement. Oil and solvents attack it easily and cause it to discolor and get brittle. It is harder than most plastics to get burning with a higher than normal melting point but is nasty when it does get going. Good for glazing in high risk locations and doors where there is a chance of falling into the glass. Poor where oil or solvents or solvent vapors in high concentrations will get to it.

nofiron
03-29-2007, 12:35 AM
Drywall is best for fire reasons and plywood or OSB behind that is really nice. And we put FRP over drywall in commercial space all the time. If you don't want to spend a fortune, put flat blocking (with scrap) in places you plan to hang or screw into and drywall over that. If it's an unattached garage or shop, use 1/2" drywall. 5/8"(that) is rated type x fire (1hr.) and is used on walls that seperate living areas from garages.

dixie
03-30-2007, 10:15 PM
Sorry but drywall has nothing over magnesiacore. I got samples and this is great stuff.

Look at their website www.magnesiacore.com and get some samples for yourself. You won't want drywall after you see this and its a do it yourselfers dream wallboard that does not require hiring a taper to refinish. Probably cheaper in the long run than drywall factoring in cost of tapers, and you can also leave it natural since it looks nice.

brownbagg
03-31-2007, 10:35 AM
I put plywood on my walls, yes it will burn but you would have to hold a torch to it. If I need to hang something, drive a nail.

drywall look good, it doesnt burn, but if you lean a shovel against it, you have a hole. if you bump the wall. you have a hole. need to hang something, cant drive no nail. if it gets wet, its ruin and mold problem.

plywood is a lot cheaper than drywall. besides its a garage, dirt grease, cutting welding. its made to look manly.

drywall you can add some nice flowerly borders maybe a pint tint high light.

dixie
03-31-2007, 03:31 PM
Magnesiacore is cheaper than plywood plus you can joint it to keep the dust and smells in the garage. Leave your blow torch on it and it wont burn. Wipe off the soot or sand off a dirty marred surface to get a new wall without reboarding. Sorry but you can't beat this stuff for a garage wall. Salt resistant to boot so the salt brought in on car tires in winter wont eat away at your garage walls.

dixie
04-04-2007, 08:22 AM
Thanks for the tip Vermaraj.

I am going ahead with using magnesiacore and will let you know how I make out with the garage walls, ceiling and floor.

GT350Mike
04-05-2007, 12:32 AM
Magnesiacore is cheaper than plywood plus you can joint it to keep the dust and smells in the garage. Leave your blow torch on it and it wont burn. Wipe off the soot or sand off a dirty marred surface to get a new wall without reboarding. Sorry but you can't beat this stuff for a garage wall. Salt resistant to boot so the salt brought in on car tires in winter wont eat away at your garage walls.


How much is Magnesiacore?

0100
04-05-2007, 07:12 AM
Yeah how much is this stuff. It sounds great. Anyone using this stuff please keep us updated.

dixie
04-07-2007, 11:36 AM
It's less than about twice as much as drywall to buy... but is there anything out there that's cheaper than drywall?

When you consider you can joint it with bondo without tapping then the time, cost, mess, clean-up and paiting that drywall must have, makes this a cheaper product for do it yourself use.

When you eliminate hiring extra trades to refinish or even paint it can save a bundle on paid labour.

It looks good as a finish. It's got an interesting grass weave like effect under the surface on the smooth side. It can go up without any coating. I'll leave it unfinished and maybe stain it for interesting effects as it says on the website.

BlackLead
04-07-2007, 07:32 PM
It's less than about twice as much as drywall to buy... but is there anything out there that's cheaper than drywall?

When you consider you can joint it with bondo without tapping then the time, cost, mess, clean-up and paiting that drywall must have, makes this a cheaper product for do it yourself use.

When you eliminate hiring extra trades to refinish or even paint it can save a bundle on paid labour.

It looks good as a finish. It's got an interesting grass weave like effect under the surface on the smooth side. It can go up without any coating. I'll leave it unfinished and maybe stain it for interesting effects as it says on the website.

I note on the magnesiacore website that they are an on-line wholesaler. Does this mean they won't sell directly to the general public? And if they do, how does the cost of shipping factor in? Is the magnesiacore heavier or lighter than drywall? And with the size limited to 4'x8', would it still be more cost-effective than drywall, which is available in 4'x12' sheets? Are you comparing cost on a per-square-foot basis, or per sheet? My garage interior is currently unfinished, and I'm also looking into the various options available. Thanks for any input.

V-10 Killer
04-07-2007, 08:12 PM
When you eliminate hiring extra trades to refinish or even paint it can save a bundle on paid labour.

The last I heard, drywall was about $0.20/sq.ft. and finishing was another $0.20/sq.ft.
So if you spend nearly twice as much for the stuff to do it yourself, and then pay to ship it, you're probably right at what it would cost to have drywall professionally installed.

dixie
04-08-2007, 09:19 AM
My garage walls currently have OSB (wood flake board) from 20 years ago when I put it up because I wanted something stronger than drywall that I could bang around. I taped the joints with a wood filler, but it now looks like crap. I plan to leave everything the way it is and screw magnesiacore over it. I will use 2" screws to go throught the 5/8" OSB and into the wood studs behind it. I am not sure if I should go with 1/2", 3/8" or 1/4" yet. I was told that if I go 1/4" I need full contact and a panel adhesive should be used before screwing magnesiacore. I should leave a 1/8" gap between sheets to fill with the bondo and then shave off the bondo before it fully sets (like they show on the video). I then leave it natural (maybe apply a clear coat sealer like 2% silicone I used on my interlock stone. Sounds easy enough to do everything myself. I will let everyone know how I make out.

This is the way it looks now: 10486

dixie
04-13-2007, 11:12 PM
The last I heard, drywall was about $0.20/sq.ft. and finishing was another $0.20/sq.ft.
So if you spend nearly twice as much for the stuff to do it yourself, and then pay to ship it, you're probably right at what it would cost to have drywall professionally installed.

Drywall will get beat up pretty bad in a few months. I used OSB which was much stronger but still looks lame as a wall finish. After painting it you see all the wood flakes on the wall which makes it look cheap.

Magnesiacore is hard like concrete so it will withstand the abuse of a garage better than anything I have seen.

I can leave it natural without painting which also saves a few bucks. But again the biggest savings in my free labour (I don't charge myself much). If I can bondo the joints, that easy enough.

dixie
04-21-2007, 01:46 PM
I got my material and did some trials with the nail gun and it works great. Nothing to see but a small dint where the nail goes in just like with wood paneling. Don't need to fill them since they blend in with the patern and are clean and flush.

I used 1-1/4" finishing nails on 1/4" magnesiacore over my old OSB and it was solid as rock. I don't need any panel adhesive with using the nail gun.

Also the butt joints look fine. I've decided not to do a fill on the joints since it looks fine butted together. Even the outside corner looks good with just the edge of the board showing. I can make square cuts with my table saw and line them up flush at the outside corners. I will caulk the inside corners for show

I will start the project sometime durring the comming week since I may not get around to it this weekend and will post pictures for before and after shots. Hopefully by next weekend I should have enough time for this.

V-10 Killer
04-22-2007, 01:12 AM
Are you going to do the ceiling with this stuff too?

dixie
04-22-2007, 09:06 AM
I am going to do the whole garage including the ceiling and the back of the garage doors since they are banged too up after 20 years.

Super easy to work with. Cuts with a utility knife. Score and snap without making dust. Hold it up to the wall or ceiling and nail gun shot with finishing nails makes solid connections. I was really surprised how well it nails on with finishing nails with 1/4" thick material.

The 18 gage finishing nails have tiny heads. Can't see the nail heads unless you go right up and they look like the patern on the board. There's no need to fill them.

The joints can be left without filling. They go nice and tight between sheets. The inside corners is where I am making the cut edges meet and I would caulk those to avoid filling.

Itzkwik
04-22-2007, 09:48 AM
:needpics:
Post some pics of the new stuff.

dixie
04-22-2007, 11:37 PM
Ok... This is just my corner test area. I only had time to test the material out with my nail gun. But this is the same spot from the prior "before" picture I posted.

What do you think? Can't notice the nail gun holes at all since it blends in with the patern in the magnesiacore. It should work just as well with finishng nails and a hammer.

I'll try to do more over next weekend when I have more time. Busy week at work next week. I start lots of projects around the house and never get to have enough time to finish them in one shot. Bear with me and I'll do more soon.
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=10771&stc=1&d=1177299319

dixie
04-22-2007, 11:49 PM
10486

This is the before picture with OSB and white paint. I just cut the magnesiacore with a table saw and tacked it on over the old OSB without removing anything. No mess by encapsulating it under the new board.

BTW the table saw with a wood finishing blade cuts through it like butter leaving a sharp clean edge without the need to sand it smooth.

BlackLead
04-23-2007, 12:53 AM
Ok... This is just my corner test area. I only had time to test the material out with my nail gun. But this is the same spot from the prior "before" picture I posted.

What do you think? Can't notice the nail gun holes at all since it blends in with the patern in the magnesiacore. It should work just as well with finishng nails and a hammer.

I'll try to do more over next weekend when I have more time. Busy week at work next week. I start lots of projects around the house and never get to have enough time to finish them in one shot. Bear with me and I'll do more soon.
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=10771&stc=1&d=1177299319

That has a nice industrial look to it. Looks good. Do they sell direct to the consumer? Judging from their site, it looks like you have to be a business to buy from them. Is this correct?

dixie
04-23-2007, 11:00 AM
You can buy direct if there is no stocking distributor in your area. It costs something more than in a retail store because of shipping in small quantities and you need to arrange to unload it from a freight truck. You have to buy one pallet minimum if there's no stocking distributor in your area. There email is here www.magnesiacore.com

The stuff is good for many things like a general purpose wood particle board. I'm using it for shelving and to make over odd things around the house, revamping the top of my wood patio table that's in rough shape by nailing this over the bench and top.

dixie
04-27-2007, 11:51 PM
Check this out

http://magnesiacore.com/images/HPIM1143.jpg

It's a picture of magnesiacore used to remake a kitchen counter top. Very versatile material.

There's more pictures on this link

http://magnesiacore.com/projects.html

Fredartic
04-28-2007, 12:21 AM
There is a special on SmartSide panel from Goodfellow company, grade B. I think that this stuff is the best. No joint to do, no paint, so you save time. It's usually used for panelling the outside of house, garage... It's painted, waterproof, very strong, 7/16 thick, you can drill in... So, I just see advantages for these stuff, don't you agree? Here. it's $19.99 per panel of 4x8.

V-10 Killer
04-28-2007, 01:15 AM
I just priced it out for my garage project. The price was about what I'd expect for finished drywall. But the freight and brokerage fees tipped the scales a little too much. I think I'll just pay for drywall.

dixie
04-29-2007, 08:58 PM
Did you get samples? If you did you should agree that its worth every penny more than drywall even with the shipping costs. Plus you don't have to paint it.

dixie
05-04-2007, 07:08 PM
Just letting everyone know that I did a little more trial work on my garage and find that with the 1/4" you do need panel adhesive in addition to the brad nails as they say on their website. Otherwise it sounds hollow with only the 1/4" magnesiacore over the old 5/8" since the old OSB is not as perfectly flat as the magnesiacore is.

If its just studs then 3/8" should be good enough for normal household wear and tear. The 1/2" would make your garage walls rock solid if you really want to throw your tools and heavy equipment around and bang into the walls without damaging them.

dixie
05-14-2007, 11:57 PM
There is a special on SmartSide panel from Goodfellow company, grade B. I think that this stuff is the best. No joint to do, no paint, so you save time. It's usually used for panelling the outside of house, garage... It's painted, waterproof, very strong, 7/16 thick, you can drill in... So, I just see advantages for these stuff, don't you agree? Here. it's $19.99 per panel of 4x8.

I don't know if the inside of a garage looks good in artificial wood. I don't think the stuff is that resitant to garage type activities and abuses. Probably won't last more than OSB which is what I had on before.

m59racer
05-16-2007, 09:58 AM
Being a machinist, I want the bottom 4 to 5 feet done with stainless steel sheet stock. About a 1 foot contrasting border above that, then the rest done with either gloss or semi-gloss white for light reflectivity. This should make for keeping it clean fairly easy, as it seems the bottom 4 feet are what gets the most crud on it.

Rich.

rizzorace
05-16-2007, 05:23 PM
I cant believe noone has said to use corogated metal, it cost me 1350.00 to do the walls in this 36 x 40 x 14 high, they come painted and cut to size. so easy a chimp could put them up to.

V-10 Killer
05-16-2007, 07:21 PM
Don't you have to back that with drywall or OSB or something to keep it straight? Looks like you have it installed in a pole building, where there is ample horizontal screwing locations. What about framed garages with studs 16" on center?

Bruce T
05-17-2007, 10:11 AM
I've mentioned using pole barn siding on the inside on here in other posts many times. Always to get it blown off and people suggesting that super expensive fiberglass stuff that needs a osb backer anyway. I thought it was maybe a regional thing because almost every industrial place or auto/fab shop around here uses it. Its cheap, comes in colors, somes cut to what you exactly want, and is easy to put up. It needs NO backing (pole barns dont need backing when its on the outside) and no extra finishing like drywall. My 34x48x14 will cost around $1800 for the walls and ceiling and it will be put up in a day or so.

Morrisman
05-17-2007, 11:14 AM
I reckon I'll just use a good wire brushing and a coat of decent gloss white paint myself. :bounce:
It's only a small shop so heating it when I'm in there will only require a small fan heater, and concrete ain't gonna burn, crack, chip or crumble if I lean a little hard on it. The inner roof will be plasterboard, or 'sheet rock' as you guys over the waters call it. A modicum of fire retardency is needed so I don't ever torch my mucho labour intensive roof.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v225/Pburgess68/Garage/Rooftimberinplace.jpg

Fredartic
05-24-2007, 08:55 PM
What about the canexel panel usually used for outside?

Fredartic
05-26-2007, 05:03 PM
I just bought canexel panel. They will be delivered tomorrow. This stuff is discontinued in panel. That's why I buy them now. The salesman was very impressive when I told him what for I bought it; he said that it will do a great job! It's wood finish looking painted and sealed in manufacture. The color available is only sand and it's perfect, not too much dark.

bonehed927
05-29-2007, 11:06 PM
i just finished the walls in my 24x24 garage. Debated back and forth with sheet rock, panels, osb etc. Went to Lowes and got Silver peg board for $8.00 per sheet on clearance. Did all the walls for less than $100. Light reflects off the silver and I can hang anything anywhere.

Fredartic
06-02-2007, 10:21 PM
i just finished the walls in my 24x24 garage. Debated back and forth with sheet rock, panels, osb etc. Went to Lowes and got Silver peg board for $8.00 per sheet on clearance. Did all the walls for less than $100. Light reflects off the silver and I can hang anything anywhere.

Hey very good! I would like to see pictures of it.

jamesleroy
06-07-2007, 12:34 PM
I used 1/2" osb and it works good but I would suggest nails instead of screws so you don't have those annoying nipples to deal with especially when you install the plastic molding along the bottom. I primed then painted with glidden paint. I'd also suggest using the backside of the osb so you don't have to use extra coats to assure the black reference lines cover completely.

Splinter
06-22-2007, 10:23 AM
interesting topic, don't stop now guys.

what about osb with a fire resistant paint?

69Cat
06-22-2007, 09:53 PM
Isn't there a PVC or some similar type of panel that looks like the ribbed steel in construction? I thought I saw it on the net once. Seemed like a good idea as the color is moulded in, it would be easy to work with, clean and wouldn't be as noisey as a steel lined interior.

I did plywood eight years ago and painted it. Cost about 25% more than drywall sheets at the time because 3/8" good-one-side plywood was pretty darn cheap in relation to drywall so was an obvious way to go at the time.

Bent Nail
06-22-2007, 11:07 PM
It would be nice to know what your intentions are for the garage?
Do you need something with a retardant for welding?
Moisture resistance for water?

yard_dawg
06-28-2007, 09:51 PM
magnesiacore sample jsut came in today. they sent all kind of samples ranging in differ thickness. thsi stuff looks great, but like everyone has said the price. i will be welding and water could be a factor some times. jsut trying to ponder a lot of ideas here. thsi si next pahse in my project. tahks for all the ideas here guys.

ersatzs2
09-19-2007, 02:24 PM
Ok... This is just my corner test area. I only had time to test the material out with my nail gun. But this is the same spot from the prior "before" picture I posted.

What do you think? Can't notice the nail gun holes at all since it blends in with the patern in the magnesiacore. It should work just as well with finishng nails and a hammer.

I'll try to do more over next weekend when I have more time. Busy week at work next week. I start lots of projects around the house and never get to have enough time to finish them in one shot. Bear with me and I'll do more soon.
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=10771&stc=1&d=1177299319

Dixie, I was wondering if you had finished your installation and had any more pictures? I love the idea of using this stuff but wondered what it looked like over large surface areas?

v8garage
09-19-2007, 04:27 PM
1/2" plywood is what I am using. Of course it helps that I have a friend in the sign business that gives me all of the 1/2" sign board that he takes down when he puts up new signs. When I run out of the sign board I will finish the rest with regular 1/2" plywood painted semi gloss and then attach my metal signs to that. Eventually my whole walls will be signs out of either 1/2" plywood or signs attached to 1/2" plywood. Might not be everybodies cup of tea but I am a sign collector. Can't think of a better way to display my collection.

flesburg
10-26-2007, 09:18 PM
I priced out magnesiacore today, and found that the 1/2 inch material which they recommend over studs and for ceiling costs $1.50 per square foot delivered to my closest skid unloading facility (my company), and that works out to a little over $50 per 4'x8' sheet.

I do not think I will use magnesiacore for interior sheeting in my garage. I believe I can get 5/8" drywall professionally installed and taped for a lot less money. (I was told under $15 per 4x8 sheet). I can buy 1/2 inch good one side plywood for about $11 per sheet.

Any others find this kind of price discrepancy? Someone earlier in this thread said they thought Magniaiacore would cost about 2 times that of drywall and about the same as drywall installed. Not based on what I have been able to determine.

What have any of you been quoted as a price for finished drywall?

ron in sc
10-27-2007, 05:54 AM
I used 5/8" firequard drywall. Code requires it due to close proximity of garage to house.

PAToyota
10-27-2007, 09:36 AM
Another for 5/8" firecode drywall. Also, it is somewhat impressive the difference that extra 1/8" makes as far as the material holding up. Somehow 1/2" is much easier to damage than 5/8" drywall.

convx4
10-27-2007, 04:34 PM
I have a 30x40x11.5 pole barn. Used 1/4" OSB and fiberglass insulation for the walls and ceiling The 1/4" was was cheep and durable. It did warp and needed more mounting support than I thought. I made my own sheet rock lift from my cheery picker. This along with some scaffolding allowed me to work by my self on the ceiling.

ankhman
11-08-2007, 04:22 PM
I just happened across the magnesiacore material since I was looking to redo my garage. I live in Houston, does this company have a retailer or distributor here in the Southwest USA? How much does a 4x8 sheet cost (without shipping)? I for one appreciate your post about the use of the product. Thanks a bunch.

flesburg
11-08-2007, 10:28 PM
ankhman:

read about 4 posts up from yours.

Delivered to Pontiac, IL in a quantity of 400 32"x48" sheets, it is $1.50 per sq or equal to $50 per 4'x8' sheet. Pretty high priced stuff. Considering that installed taped and finished drywall is like 50c or less (depending on the drywall installer and how busy he is at the time) per sq ft in this area.

shimp
11-23-2007, 09:32 PM
I cant believe noone has said to use corogated metal, it cost me 1350.00 to do the walls in this 36 x 40 x 14 high, they come painted and cut to size. so easy a chimp could put them up to.

this would be the best choice

bluesman2a
11-23-2007, 09:48 PM
I cant believe noone has said to use corogated metal, it cost me 1350.00 to do the walls in this 36 x 40 x 14 high, they come painted and cut to size. so easy a chimp could put them up to.

So where does one find corrugated cut to size like this? I've checked depot and lowes and they only have like 3' wide pieces (at least on the floor). This is EXACTLY what I am looking for on my build, but I'll probably only do it up the first 4' and still put OSB behind it.

bgarrett
11-23-2007, 11:38 PM
So where does one find corrugated cut to size like this? I've checked depot and lowes and they only have like 3' wide pieces (at least on the floor). This is EXACTLY what I am looking for on my build, but I'll probably only do it up the first 4' and still put OSB behind it.

McElroy Metals has long pieces

Pure Oil
11-24-2007, 12:11 AM
Plywood burns. Sheetrock is made from hydrated gypsum. When you heat it it resists heat by releasing the water bound up in the gypsum. It actually sweats out water and this prevents burning far more so than any of the treated plywoods or even cement board This chemical action also helps prevent the heat from penetrating and burning the wood structure behind it.:thumbup: Allright -I'd say you know your stuff - by chance did you stay at a Holiday Inn?

Jaytree
11-24-2007, 10:39 AM
:
Originally Posted by rizzorace
I cant believe noone has said to use corogated metal, it cost me 1350.00 to do the walls in this 36 x 40 x 14 high, they come painted and cut to size. so easy a chimp could put them up to.



this would be the best choice

He said "chimp". Not "Shimp".




Still a good idea!

kpendlet
01-01-2008, 11:22 PM
I cant believe noone has said to use corogated metal, it cost me 1350.00 to do the walls in this 36 x 40 x 14 high, they come painted and cut to size. so easy a chimp could put them up to.

This is what I have been thinking about as well - thanks for the pic. Can you tell me what metal product you used or specifics on the panels (panel width, rib height, etc.)? Your shop looks very nice. :thumbup: It looks like the "R-Panel" on the McElroy Metals website: http://www.mcelroymetal.com/content/products/display.cfm?product_id=24

D KRAGER
01-02-2008, 09:34 AM
Metal Usually Comes In 3' Wide Sheets. To Get Special Lengths, Go To A Company That Uilds Pole Buildings, They Can Order The Color And Exact Length That You Need. On Inside Walls, You Can Insatll It Horizontally, So This Would Work With 16" Center Stud Construction.

As For Ceilings.... They Make A Taller Ribbed Style That Can Spam Up To 8' Between Rafters. This Also You Get Through A Pole Barn Supplier.

Bad Brad777
01-02-2008, 07:30 PM
I'm using 7/16" OSU with a 1x4 trim against the ceiling and on the bottom...no tape on the joints. I'm painting everything with a good white latex after primer, then putting a blue strip along the top with a red and black stripe on the bottom. It is durable and will look nice.

FireWrench
10-23-2009, 10:11 PM
F@#& it! I'm using T1-11....:bubbrubb:

rasit
10-24-2009, 11:15 PM
Aren't dents a concern with the corregated metal walls?

mad57
10-25-2009, 09:53 AM
I love the metal idea as well but wondering how it is to anchor say cabinets on the wall with the raised edge, then if you take something down you have holes to fill and try to match the paint. Not the end of the world but still a consirn. Dry wall still looks like the best bang for the buck. Man i hate dry wall though:) heavy sh*t.