View Full Version : Wilton Vise History


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kc-steve
01-05-2011, 10:00 AM
Hi all,

I've been looking around for any history on Wilton vises and it is sparse at best. The reason I would like this info is because I am writing an article for a new website, http://junkyardtools.com (site is currently offline while I build it in PHP format.) Sorry for the shameless plug. :) But I am sincere about getting some historical information.

EDIT: The Wilton History webpage is online now, and also reference my "Friends at Garage Journal" as a primary source of information.
http://junkyardtools.com/tool_history/wilton

About the only thing I can find is that Wilton was founded in 1941. And THAT is on the Wilton website! Not very proud are they?

But I am sure there is a long interesting history that needs to be told. I know some guys here have said the new Wilton vises are not as good as the old. Is that because they are made overseas now?

How about models and when they were made? I have a 3" "930" tradesman I believe, but don't have a clue when it was made.

Thanks,
Steve

jon619
01-06-2011, 01:50 AM
I think it was autopts who said that if it was Chicago made, it was 50s or earlier.

kc-steve
01-06-2011, 09:12 AM
That's something I didn't know. Believe me, I don't know ANYTHING about these great tools and anyone with ANY info can help.

Thanks,
Steve

DavidB
01-06-2011, 11:27 AM
For the date of your vise, pull the dynamic jaw all the way out and flip it over. On the bottom of the round end should be a flat section with a date stamped in it. Have you tried emailing Wilton and asking about thier history? I'd think someone there would have some kind of document with thier history. Also mention try mentioning its for a blog posting. I'm sure they love free advertising as much as the next company.

autopts
01-06-2011, 12:35 PM
The Wilton history story is a long one. Any vise that is stamped "Chicago" was made before their move out to Schiller Pk. in 1957.

Did you know retired Wilton employees schedule a dinner once a year to get together? In 2009 the Wilton Co's original founders son attended. He was a major player in Wilton's success in the 70's & 80's

kc-steve
01-07-2011, 12:57 PM
The Wilton history story is a long one. Any vise that is stamped "Chicago" was made before their move out to Schiller Pk. in 1957.

Did you know retired Wilton employees schedule a dinner once a year to get together? In 2009 the Wilton Co's original founders son attended. He was a major player in Wilton's success in the 70's & 80's

Thanks autopts, interesting info. Is Schiller Pk. in Illinois? Never mind, I just looked it up. It is in the Chicago metro area.

Steve

kc-steve
01-07-2011, 01:03 PM
For the date of your vise, pull the dynamic jaw all the way out and flip it over. On the bottom of the round end should be a flat section with a date stamped in it. Have you tried emailing Wilton and asking about thier history? I'd think someone there would have some kind of document with thier history. Also mention try mentioning its for a blog posting. I'm sure they love free advertising as much as the next company.

Thanks for the tip David. I called the new owner since 2002, Walter Meier (pronounced like Meyer), and they tell me they don't have any history documents before 2002. :( That's TERRIBLE they would pretty much ignore Wilton's formative years.

Did anyone else own the Wilton company before 2002? I'm gonna have to rely on everyone's help because Walter Meier is more interested in telling us about the Meier company.

Thanks,
Steve

spongerich
01-07-2011, 10:28 PM
As for the dates on the slide, some seem to have them and some dont. I've also read that in at least some cases those dates were the end of warranty date, not the date of manufacture. Warranty was 5 years.

ajchien
01-07-2011, 10:49 PM
As for the dates on the slide, some seem to have them and some dont. I've also read that in at least some cases those dates were the end of warranty date, not the date of manufacture. Warranty was 5 years.

Really?! My Wilton is stamped 4-46. So that means it was made in 1941 - their first year? Does anyone have an earlier stamp?

DavidB
01-07-2011, 11:05 PM
As for the dates on the slide, some seem to have them and some dont. I've also read that in at least some cases those dates were the end of warranty date, not the date of manufacture. Warranty was 5 years.

Ah, yes I should have mentioned that as well. Based on a pic I saw on OWWM, the warranty expiration date stamps have the text "GUAR EXP" stamped above them. I don't know if this is always true. It was also mentioned that the 5 year warranty went away in the mid sixties though so that should help determine if it is a manufacturing date.

Here is the pic, originally posted on OWWM.org by 9watts. Hopefully, he'd be ok with me borrowing it.
http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/ll113/o9watts/Wilton6-30-61.jpg


I'm surprised that Wilton has no info on their history. That's just sad. I don't know if you're a member of owwm.org but there is a moderator over there named jblenzi that seems to know a fair amount about Wiltons. You might try contacting him as well.

Here's the patent for the bullet style vise if that helps at all: http://www.datamp.org/patents/displayPatent.php?pn=D131498&id=40894

autopts
01-07-2011, 11:14 PM
Really?! My Wilton is stamped 4-46. So that means it was made in 1941 - their first year? Does anyone have an earlier stamp?

They may have been finalizing their designs around 1939-1940. Yes, the early dates stamped were 5 years after the vise was originally made. It was for warranty reasons which was 5 years.
WMH wants nothing to do with Wilton's past. In 2010 Wilton customer service even changed the name when answering phones from "Good Morning, Wilton Tool Customer Service" to "Hi, this is Walter Meyers Holding Inc, may I help you"? WMH is Swiss based and huge! They want nothing more then to globalize every line they have. They tried it with some of their Tradesman vises being made in China. The 1740, 1750,& 1760. American users started screaming about how poorly made vises they were so eventually they brought that vise back home to make.

kc-steve
01-08-2011, 08:08 AM
. . .I'm surprised that Wilton has no info on their history. That's just sad. I don't know if you're a member of owwm.org but there is a moderator over there named jblenzi that seems to know a fair amount about Wiltons. You might try contacting him as well. . . .

Never heard of it, but thanks. I will try and join the "Old Wood Working Machines" forum and see what I can find out. I also joined Practical Machinist forum but it has taken 3 or 4 days just to get OK-ed to type a question.

I was reading post at PM and found out the differences between a Machinist and Mechanics vise. :)

Major differences include that the Mechanics vise was meant to be beat on with a sledge, and typically includes a pipe grip below the regular vise grips. That would seem to be the preferred vise to me, but those machinists "wouldn't want one."

Quoting Groucho Marx, "I wouldn't join a club that would have me as a member."

Steve

spongerich
01-08-2011, 08:21 AM
Really?! My Wilton is stamped 4-46. So that means it was made in 1941 - their first year? Does anyone have an earlier stamp?

Mine's stamped 1946 as well. Does yours say Patented or Pat Pending?

KC-Steve - If you haven't already done so, you might also spend some time searching patents.google.com. There might be some good info hidden there as well. I assume that Wilton has at least a few patents filed there.

kc-steve
01-08-2011, 08:55 AM
Autopts, thanks again. BTW, I checked David's patent link and it has the names A.J. Vogl, and Hugh W. Vogl on several of their patents.

FYI per our pm's.

Spongerich: Thanks, I found the "bullet style" patent was granted on March 3, 1942. Applied for on August 1, 1941.

Thanks,
Steve

kc-steve
01-08-2011, 09:32 AM
. . . you might also spend some time searching patents.google.com. There might be some good info hidden there as well. I assume that Wilton has at least a few patents filed there.

Correct me if I am wrong, but I think I found the patent for the "Columbian style" Wilton vise, US Patent: D154,001. It doesn't explicitly say that it is the Columbian though.

Applied: Nov. 12, 1947
Granted: May 31, 1949

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=D154001&id=40895&set=2

Steve

autopts
01-08-2011, 10:12 AM
Correct me if I am wrong, but I think I found the patent for the "Columbian style" Wilton vise, US Patent: D154,001. It doesn't explicitly say that it is the Columbian though.

Applied: Nov. 12, 1947
Granted: May 31, 1949

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=D154001&id=40895&set=2

Steve

Another fruitful search Steve. I believe that was a patent for Wilton's Torco vise. That was was made very early on. Notice the shapes of the anvils?

http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae325/autopts71045/Torco.jpg

kc-steve
01-08-2011, 10:39 AM
Another fruitful search Steve. I believe that was a patent for Wilton's Torco vise. That was was made very early on. Notice the shapes of the anvils?


AWESOME! Autopts, you are ALWAYS a wealth of information. :)

Edit: I think that photo also shows a later patent of their swivel base, US Patent: D184,413
Applied: Feb. 14, 1957
Granted: Feb. 10, 1959

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=D184413&id=40886&set=7

Is it possible that (my new link) was the Columbian style? I don't really know.

Thanks,
Steve

ajchien
01-08-2011, 08:59 PM
Mine is simply stamped "4-46". Nothing else. No "Patent", "Pat Pending", nor is there a "Guar Exp" on it.



Mine's stamped 1946 as well. Does yours say Patented or Pat Pending?

KC-Steve - If you haven't already done so, you might also spend some time searching patents.google.com. There might be some good info hidden there as well. I assume that Wilton has at least a few patents filed there.

autopts
01-08-2011, 11:12 PM
AWESOME! Autopts, you are ALWAYS a wealth of information. :)

Edit: I think that photo also shows a later patent of their swivel base, US Patent: D184,413
Applied: Feb. 14, 1957
Granted: Feb. 10, 1959

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=D184413&id=40886&set=7

Is it possible that (my new link) was the Columbian style? I don't really know.

Thanks,
Steve

http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae325/autopts71045/TripleTitan.jpg
That was Wilton's "Rapid Titan 3 Way" Triple duty vise. Final production had that vise with 3 different options, 1, it had woodworking jaws, 2, pipe jaws, and 3, regular vise jaws. Wilton entered quick and early on the DIY market.

rsieracki
01-08-2011, 11:34 PM
Thanks autopts, interesting info. Is Schiller Pk. in Illinois? Never mind, I just looked it up. It is in the Chicago metro area.

Steve

in case your interested the old wilton plant is occupied by Russo Hardware at roughly Irving pk rd & wesley terrace... google earth should show soo line rail tracks behind the block long factory, the park on the corner use to be a parking lot i played baseball in (knocking a homer thru a factory window at one point) and a house on that street i grew up in

spongerich
01-09-2011, 01:12 AM
Very interesting. I believed that my bullet was a '46 based on the date on the keyway, but it's stamped Pat Pending so that would put the DOM at '41

Thanks, I found the "bullet style" patent was granted on March 3, 1942. Applied for on August 1, 1941

v7guy
01-09-2011, 05:08 AM
a lot of fun info here, it's a shame the parent co. wants to have nothing to do with the co. history that it purchased.

autopts
01-09-2011, 05:24 PM
a lot of fun info here, it's a shame the parent co. wants to have nothing to do with the co. history that it purchased.

Yes, and its a shame that the old Wilton employees meet once a year at a dinner and nobody talks or has been taking cronological notes all these years to put a book together. We have to piece it together.

kc-steve
01-09-2011, 07:40 PM
With the help of you guys here I finally found the "warranty expiration" date on mine. It is stamped 9-46 giving it a manufacturing date before the end of their first year. At least one of you guys has mine beat by 5 months though, but I never imagined it would be that old, especially after I bought it at garage sale for $18 marked down from $25 on the 3rd day of the sale. :)

Steve

autopts
01-09-2011, 09:50 PM
With the help of you guys here I finally found the "warranty expiration" date on mine. It is stamped 9-46 giving it a manufacturing date before the end of their first year. At least one of you guys has mine beat by 5 months though, but I never imagined it would be that old, especially after I bought it at garage sale for $18 marked down from $25 on the 3rd day of the sale. :)

Steve

Steve, that Wilton, for its age, is in very nice shape. is it missing the back cap?

kc-steve
01-09-2011, 10:53 PM
Autopts, I don't really know if it is missing a back cap or not, but it would look better than the photo below I suppose. :)

Anyone have a photo of what the back cap should look like?

I can tell you that the guy that sold it to me said he had painted it with as close a color as he had, but I doubt he spent a lot of time on it. He is my dentist and buys and sells tools as a hobby. Eighteen bucks isn't much even if it is a model 930. :D

Steve

spongerich
01-10-2011, 01:00 AM
Here's a few pics of my #4. Date on the slide is 1-46 which I suppose makes it one of the earliest ones. Steve, you can see the end cap there. Some folks have had luck replacing them with freeze plugs which are apparently available in a variety of sizes.

Being an 840, I wasn't lucky enough to get mine for $18.
I had to pay the full asking price of $25.


http://i1019.photobucket.com/albums/af320/rmaracing/bullet1.jpg
http://i1019.photobucket.com/albums/af320/rmaracing/bullet2.jpg
http://i1019.photobucket.com/albums/af320/rmaracing/bullet3.jpg
http://i1019.photobucket.com/albums/af320/rmaracing/bullet4.jpg

autopts
01-10-2011, 10:18 AM
Replacement jaws are hard to sell on those older 3' & 3/1/2" Wiltons. Often the sides are not even, in fact, I quit selling the early ones because most buyers did not have a way to grind down the 1/8" overlap on each end. Occasionally the holes were perfect but often times they had to be tweaked at final assembly. Nice early 840 and the paint might be original?

kc-steve
01-10-2011, 10:37 AM
Replacement jaws are hard to sell on those older 3' & 3/1/2" Wiltons. . . . Nice early 840 and the paint might be original?

Is the gray color the original paint color? My dentist and I thought it was the bluish-green color.

Just curious, I thought about making my own jaws out of aluminum stock. I wouldn't think it was difficult even though I don't have a mill, but do own a drill press. I wouldn't try making steel jaws though. More often than not, I prefer jaws that won't leave marks on my working piece.

An after thought, . . . could I make jaws from cold-rolled steel maybe? That would be softer than tool steel, yet harder than aluminum. I have made some tools out of cold-rolled and it is harder than hot-rolled steel.

Steve

autopts
01-10-2011, 12:11 PM
Is the gray color the original paint color? My dentist and I thought it was the bluish-green color.

Just curious, I thought about making my own jaws out of aluminum stock. I wouldn't think it was difficult even though I don't have a mill, but do own a drill press. I wouldn't try making steel jaws though. More often than not, I prefer jaws that won't leave marks on my working piece.

An after thought, . . . could I make jaws from cold-rolled steel maybe? That would be softer than tool steel, yet harder than aluminum. I have made some tools out of cold-rolled and it is harder than hot-rolled steel.

Steve

Some were a wierd off Green and some were Gray. I might have a pair of 4" used smooth steel jaws. The C-C on the mounting holes would be the same. Yes cold rolled steel would be good.

spongerich
01-11-2011, 12:42 AM
I think it's been painted at some point. I don't believe that the nosepiece that the handle runs through would have been painted originally, but I'm not 100% sure. It's in remarkably good condition for its age and looks like it lead an easy life.

The jackas...uh.. I mean previous owner had it sitting on the ground under a tarp. It's amazing there's not more rust.

kc-steve
01-11-2011, 06:55 AM
Spongerich: That is a great example of an early 4-inch Wilton! I'm still not sure whether it is a "Machinist" or "Tradesman" model though. Can I use any of those photos in my new website?

I'm up and at 'em early today, got too much to do like install a blade on my lawn tractor to see if I can dig myself out of the snow here.

Steve

kc-steve
01-11-2011, 06:59 AM
Found some Wilton history on the Vintage Machinery .org website that verifies what we have already figured out. :)

Manufacturers Index - Wilton Corp.

Last Modified: Dec 17 2010 4:28PM by Jeff_Joslin

This company has been in business since 1941, though they did not get involved in woodworking machinery until 1964. The original company name is uncertain. By 1951 it was Wilton Tool Manufacturing Co., Inc.; that name lasted until at least 1965. By 2000 it was Wilton Tool Co. LLC. The Wilton Corp. name was in use by 1984, and it seems to have supplanted the "Wilton Tool Co. LLC" name by 2003 or so. It's all a bit confusing.

Wilton purchased the rights to some Boice-Crane products, but they have apparently ceased manufacture of all (except the Wilton-designed model 3000/2900 tilting-arbor saw) and threw out the patterns. Drill presses and sanders appear in their current catalog, but they may be manufactured by someone else.

In early 2002, Wilton Corp. and the well-known importer Jet merged operations. Both are owned by WMH - Walter Meier Holding Co. This holding company owns Wilton, Jet, Powermatic, and Performax.

Steve

kc-steve
01-11-2011, 07:10 AM
Here is a Wilton Vise I have never heard of before from the same website above. It is called a "Wiltomatic" using an air-hydraulic system. http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=11222


"Wiltomatic" air-hydraulic bench vise.

Description/Model: Wiltomatic 5S450 pneumatic vise
Date of Manufacturer: June 1969
Machine Sizes: 4", 4 1/2", 6"

Bill Nance says, "This vise came out of an old foundry in the SF bay area that was shutting down its operations. It is a "Wiltomatic" that was designed for use with air-powered foot-pedal controlled clamping mechanism that had long since gone missing. The pneumatic portion provides about 1/8" of travel for the head, to allow hands-free closing of the jaws on stock. I completely disassembled the internals, figured out and cleaned up all the mechanical parts, and have it in use as my daily driver."

I hope they don't mind me linking to their photos. I am at least giving proper credit.

Steve

kc-steve
01-11-2011, 07:57 AM
AWESOME Frank! I'll see if I can get some more catalog info from them. I really don't know why that gal I called told me they didn't have any historical info. :(

Nice photo example of the "Triple" home shop vise. "Autopts" identified it in the patent search in his post #19, but you have the first real pics of one in use. :)

Thanks,
Steve

autopts
01-11-2011, 11:28 AM
[QUOTE=kc-steve;1277618]Here is a Wilton Vise I have never heard of before from the same website above. It is called a "Wiltomatic" using an air-hydraulic system. http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=11222


Wilton had their Wiltomatic shown in their early 50's cataloging. They also had a Millomatic which was their air operated mill vise. I can't say for sure if Wilton made the hydraulics for it. They could have. This is getting to be a very informative Wilton thread! Glad you started it.
I've got a number of old Wilton catalogs and I used to be able to scan pages into word documents to send. My scanner is broke.

kc-steve
01-11-2011, 05:58 PM
Found another "Vise Assembly" patent and don't know what it could be. The photo does show it holding a piece of wood though. I think they are more focused on the unusual hinge in the photo. The patentees are different but it is still listed as Wilton Corp.

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=3675916&id=40884&set=4

"Vise assembly"
Patentees: Walter Smierciak - Elgin, IL, Raymond H. Kartasuk - Lincolnwood, IL
US Patent: 3,675,916
Assignees: Wilton Corp. - Schiller Park, IL
Applied: Sep. 21, 1970
Granted: Jul. 11, 1972

Anyone know what it is?

Thanks,
Steve

kc-steve
01-11-2011, 06:06 PM
Here's YET another one I don't recognize. . . .

Anyone recognize this Wilton vise? . . . anyone? . . . Bueller? . . .Bueller?
(sorry but it seemed appropriate since Ferris (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferris_Bueller%27s_Day_Off) ... was filmed in Chicago and my voice sounds like Ben Stein's.

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=D164143&id=40896&set=3

Just says, "Vise or similar article"
Patentee: Hugh W. Vogl - Wilmette, IL
US Patent: D164,143
Applied: Sep. 13, 1950
Granted: Jul. 31, 1951

Thanks,
Steve

old salvage
01-11-2011, 07:32 PM
Thats the 'Shop King' model.

spongerich
01-11-2011, 08:06 PM
The Shop King is the 1975 Corvette of Wiltons.

All style and no substance :bounce:

They're a nice little utility vise for your average homeowner, but most guys here would break one in a week of daily use.


Here's YET another one I don't recognize. . . .

Anyone recognize this Wilton vise? . . . anyone? . . . Bueller? . . .Bueller?
(sorry but it seemed appropriate since Ferris (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferris_Bueller%27s_Day_Off) ... was filmed in Chicago and my voice sounds like Ben Stein's.

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=D164143&id=40896&set=3

Just says, "Vise or similar article"
Patentee: Hugh W. Vogl - Wilmette, IL
US Patent: D164,143
Applied: Sep. 13, 1950
Granted: Jul. 31, 1951

Thanks,
Steve

autopts
01-11-2011, 08:15 PM
They made so many Shop Kings in Chicago that they kept that model in their catalog long after they stopped making them. The only drawback on that vise is that the pipe jaws would always fall out and most of them today are missing one or both.

v7guy
01-11-2011, 10:57 PM
that quick release feature is pretty cool, neat how it was implemented.
On my vise I never did find any kind of date stamped on it, the slide only had a 1. Obviously being a C2 it's not near as old as many of them on here. It's pretty cool when you can find out the history on the tools your using.


where have you guys come across the info you do have?

kc-steve
01-12-2011, 09:14 AM
v7guy: I can't speak for everyone, but some guys here have a lot of experience refurbishing vises, and Wiltons in particular. Any info I have has been help from the guys here at GJ. :)

THE GJ SHOP KING thread,
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11305

Thanks guys,
Steve

kc-steve
01-12-2011, 09:22 AM
Here's an odd Wilton Vise from the 1970s with a hinge-type mount. Anyone ever seen, or know anything about this odd fellow?

Also note below that Wilton is now (1970s) using the name "Wilton Corp."

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=3675916&id=40884&set=4

"Vise assembly"
Patentees: Walter Smierciak - Elgin, IL, Raymond H. Kartasuk - Lincolnwood, IL
US Patent: 3,675,916
Assignees: Wilton Corp. - Schiller Park, IL
Applied: Sep. 21, 1970
Granted: Jul. 11, 1972

Thanks,
Steve

spongerich
01-12-2011, 10:29 AM
I think that's the gyro-vise which was sold under the Wilton and Columbian names (among others). I passed on one at a garage sale not too long ago. It's a nice little light duty vise. Looks like it might be handy since you can orient it in most any direction.

autopts
01-12-2011, 11:28 AM
I think that's the gyro-vise which was sold under the Wilton and Columbian names (among others). I passed on one at a garage sale not too long ago. It's a nice little light duty vise. Looks like it might be handy since you can orient it in most any direction.

I wish I had a photo to show you. I sold 2 or 3 of those small hobby type Wilton vises. Actually, I don't know how much Wilton didn't really want to market it. I forgot its name but they are on Ebay almost monthly and if you could get $25-$35 your doing good. Its jaws had two holes going thru so you could put on and make your jaw of choice, hard plastic, wood, etc. Its swiveled but also the whole vise was on a hinge so you could tilt it 90 degrees, but only one way. Wilton, to my knowledge never cataloged it. Actually it was dinky and unlike every other Wilton Product. Here's some more patent info.

http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae325/autopts71045/WiltonPatents.jpg

kc-steve
01-12-2011, 04:35 PM
I think that's the gyro-vise which was sold under the Wilton and Columbian names (among others). I passed on one at a garage sale not too long ago. It's a nice little light duty vise. Looks like it might be handy since you can orient it in most any direction.

Spongerich, you've brought up a possible link between Wilton and Columbian Vises that I have been wondering, did Wilton buyout Columbian?

If you look at Wilton's current catalog you will see the registered trademarked "Columbian" model Wilton vise. :headscrat

Any thoughts, anyone?

Steve

spongerich
01-12-2011, 06:06 PM
I wish I had a photo to show you.

Like this?

http://www.fast-autos.net/diecast-cars-models/diecast-car-image-large/columbian-vise-gyro-vise-no-73-usa_140484068672.jpg

autopts
01-13-2011, 04:58 PM
Here's an odd Wilton Vise from the 1970s with a hinge-type mount. Anyone ever seen, or know anything about this odd fellow?

Also note below that Wilton is now (1970s) using the name "Wilton Corp."

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=3675916&id=40884&set=4

"Vise assembly"
Patentees: Walter Smierciak - Elgin, IL, Raymond H. Kartasuk - Lincolnwood, IL
US Patent: 3,675,916
Assignees: Wilton Corp. - Schiller Park, IL
Applied: Sep. 21, 1970
Granted: Jul. 11, 1972

Thanks,
Steve

This was that Wilton tilting vise. It did not come with a swivel base.

http://cgi.ebay.com/WILTON-TILTING-VISE-/180612307182?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a0d5518ee

spongerich
01-13-2011, 07:37 PM
This was that Wilton tilting vise. It did not come with a swivel base.

http://cgi.ebay.com/WILTON-TILTING-VISE-/180612307182?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a0d5518ee

Looks uninspiring.

I've got a 2" baby bullet that I've been "restoring" for months so I can flip it on eBay. Deep down, I know I'm just procrastinating to see if I can find a sweet deal on a Powrarm Jr. Then I'll somehow rationalize keeping both.

kc-steve
01-14-2011, 05:24 AM
Here's an odd Wilton Vise from the 1970s with a hinge-type mount. Anyone ever seen, or know anything about this odd fellow?

Also note below that Wilton is now (1970s) using the name "Wilton Corp."

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=3675916&id=40884&set=4

"Vise assembly"
Patentees: Walter Smierciak - Elgin, IL, Raymond H. Kartasuk - Lincolnwood, IL
US Patent: 3,675,916
Assignees: Wilton Corp. - Schiller Park, IL
Applied: Sep. 21, 1970
Granted: Jul. 11, 1972

Thanks,
Steve

I think that's the gyro-vise which was sold under the Wilton and Columbian names (among others). I passed on one at a garage sale not too long ago. It's a nice little light duty vise. Looks like it might be handy since you can orient it in most any direction.

I wish I had a photo to show you. I sold 2 or 3 of those small hobby type Wilton vises. Actually, I don't know how much Wilton didn't really want to market it. I forgot its name but they are on Ebay almost monthly and if you could get $25-$35 your doing good. Its jaws had two holes going thru so you could put on and make your jaw of choice, hard plastic, wood, etc. Its swiveled but also the whole vise was on a hinge so you could tilt it 90 degrees, but only one way. Wilton, to my knowledge never cataloged it. Actually it was dinky and unlike every other Wilton Product. . . .

Like this?

http://www.fast-autos.net/diecast-cars-models/diecast-car-image-large/columbian-vise-gyro-vise-no-73-usa_140484068672.jpg

I think I found the photos of that vise, which are different though. The photos below might be the same photo as the eBay seller's. And if the photos are of that patent's vise, then we still don't know the model name yet. I think that eBay seller has the model name wrong, "Wilton Tilting Vise," because when I search using that name I get something completely different . . . a newer multi-position vise.

Any thoughts on this? Or anyone know the model name?

Steve

autopts
01-14-2011, 12:34 PM
I think I found the photos of that vise, which are different though. The photos below might be the same photo as the eBay seller's. And if the photos are of that patent's vise, then we still don't know the model name yet. I think that eBay seller has the model name wrong, "Wilton Tilting Vise," because when I search using that name I get something completely different . . . a newer multi-position vise.

Any thoughts on this? Or anyone know the model name?

Steve

Now that one came with a swivel base which is missing. Typically, that vise had a stationary base. Patents on this one might be confusing. Wilton, (I'm 90% sure) never had this vise cataloged. The concept and Patents might have been given to Wilton to produce and market this vise. This one's history is fuzzy!

kc-steve
01-16-2011, 10:03 PM
Anyone know when the Torco vise was dropped from the Wilton product line? (see below)

Thanks,
Steve


Another fruitful search Steve. I believe that was a patent for Wilton's Torco vise. That was was made very early on. Notice the shapes of the anvils?

http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae325/autopts71045/Torco.jpg

SK Guy
01-17-2011, 08:16 PM
I'd like to score one of those Titan 3-ways

autopts
01-17-2011, 10:53 PM
Anyone know when the Torco vise was dropped from the Wilton product line? (see below)

Thanks,
Steve

Like the Shop King, Wilton made that Torco for at least 10 years. They only made 2 sizes, the 3 1/2" & 4". It appeared in their catalog from the early 50's thru the 1960's. Years after Wilton started making vises in Schiller Pk. the Torco was always shown in their catalog with "Chicago" on its side. They called it a vise for the home mechanic and they probably hauled a boat load of them over when they moved from their Chicago address. Only one option, with or without pipe jaws..

Steve in SoCal
01-18-2011, 12:00 AM
I have a Torco vise, it was my first vise. My dad bought it in 1971 or 72. It was lighter than a machinist vise but IIRC much stouter than the Craftsman and other home shop vises.

Steve

racer62
01-18-2011, 03:18 AM
While standing in the check out line at a thrift store I noticed a worker coming out of the back room with a vise in his hands, I ask how much he replied hows 8 bucks sound, without looking at the vice I handed them 8 more dollars picked up my vice and headed to my truck, when I loaded it in the bed I noticed the name Wilton, a US made 4in machinist vise with out a mark on it, no sighn of ware in the jaws no rust, like new $8, My best tool deal yet.

autopts
01-18-2011, 08:03 AM
While standing in the check out line at a thrift store I noticed a worker coming out of the back room with a vise in his hands, I ask how much he replied hows 8 bucks sound, without looking at the vice I handed them 8 more dollars picked up my vice and headed to my truck, when I loaded it in the bed I noticed the name Wilton, a US made 4in machinist vise with out a mark on it, no sighn of ware in the jaws no rust, like new $8, My best tool deal yet.

Lets see it!

kc-steve
01-18-2011, 11:59 AM
While standing in the check out line at a thrift store I noticed a worker coming out of the back room with a vise in his hands, I ask how much he replied hows 8 bucks sound, without looking at the vice I handed them 8 more dollars picked up my vice and headed to my truck, when I loaded it in the bed I noticed the name Wilton, a US made 4in machinist vise with out a mark on it, no sighn of ware in the jaws no rust, like new $8, My best tool deal yet.

Well THAT certainly deserves a BIG "YOU SUCK!" for buying one of the best quality vises there is at the lowest price I've ever heard of. :)

Now I have to start cruising the thrift stores too.

When you say "Machinist vise" do you mean the bullet style?

Show it off, please!

Steve

racer62
01-19-2011, 03:43 AM
I will try to post a pic when I get home , I did look it up on the net after I got it home and thay say its a 4in machinist vise . I'll take it apart and look for a date. I worked for the Army Nat. Guard for 20yrs. as a machanic and just about every work bench in the shops I worked at had Wilton or Columbian vises that looks like the old ones your showing here, after reading all this it would be fun to take a few of them apart and see how old.

jwitt
01-19-2011, 06:58 AM
Here's an odd Wilton Vise from the 1970s with a hinge-type mount. Anyone ever seen, or know anything about this odd fellow?

Also note below that Wilton is now (1970s) using the name "Wilton Corp."

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=3675916&id=40884&set=4

"Vise assembly"
Patentees: Walter Smierciak - Elgin, IL, Raymond H. Kartasuk - Lincolnwood, IL
US Patent: 3,675,916
Assignees: Wilton Corp. - Schiller Park, IL
Applied: Sep. 21, 1970
Granted: Jul. 11, 1972

Thanks,
Steve

I've got one of those, haven't done anything with it yet. Not real heavy duty but kind of cool. I think I gave around 5 bucks for it.
http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss253/thosewitts/101_0485.jpg
http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss253/thosewitts/101_0486.jpg
http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss253/thosewitts/101_0488.jpg

Jim

Toolman Tim
01-19-2011, 01:33 PM
I think I found the photos of that vise, which are different though. The photos below might be the same photo as the eBay seller's. And if the photos are of that patent's vise, then we still don't know the model name yet. I think that eBay seller has the model name wrong, "Wilton Tilting Vise," because when I search using that name I get something completely different . . . a newer multi-position vise.

Any thoughts on this? Or anyone know the model name?

Steve


Steve,

Wasn't sure if you still knew the name of the red multi-vise that was pictured. We actually had some of them in wood shop in High School and used them to hold projects as they could be in several positions, had smooth jaws, and when the jaws tightened would clamp the swivel also. The ones at school came from a student's father that worked at the Wil-Burt Company in nearby Orrville OH. Better known for their coal stokers, and more recently telescoping masts, but they have made several different things over their long history.
http://www.willburt.com/
Here is a listing they say vises:
http://www.macraesbluebook.com/search/company.cfm?company=336059

And here is the only other pic I can find: A different base clamp, and they have the spelling wrong.
http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/vintage-wilbert-1-carving-gunsmith-vise-old-multi

Tim

kc-steve
01-19-2011, 07:54 PM
I've got one of those, haven't done anything with it yet. Not real heavy duty but kind of cool. I think I gave around 5 bucks for it.

Jim

Kewl, I bet it'll clean up and look nice soon. :)

Let us know if you refurb it.

Steve

kc-steve
01-19-2011, 07:59 PM
Steve,

Wasn't sure if you still knew the name of the red multi-vise that was pictured. We actually had some of them in wood shop in High School and used them to hold projects as they could be in several positions, had smooth jaws, and when the jaws tightened would clamp the swivel also. . . .

Tim

Naw, we haven't figured it out yet. The one you quoted me on wasn't the 3-Way Triple (aka Rapid 3-Way). That was the one with the hinge shown in the photos above by Jim. The links you provided show the multi-position-er vise, typically found when searching for with multi-vise or similar.

Let us know if you have a model name though.

Thanks,
Steve

Toolman Tim
01-20-2011, 05:06 PM
Steve,

Alittle more digging on the Will-Burt vise called a Versa-Vise.

http://www.trademarkia.com/versavise-71644885.html

And better pic:
http://www.fast-autos.net/diecast-cars-models/VERSA-VISE-by-The-Will-Burt-Co-Orville-OH-Wood-Working_190476867893.html

kc-steve
01-20-2011, 07:13 PM
Like this?

http://www.fast-autos.net/diecast-cars-models/diecast-car-image-large/columbian-vise-gyro-vise-no-73-usa_140484068672.jpg

Steve,

Alittle more digging on the Will-Burt vise called a Versa-Vise.

http://www.trademarkia.com/versavise-71644885.html

And better pic:
http://www.fast-autos.net/diecast-cars-models/VERSA-VISE-by-The-Will-Burt-Co-Orville-OH-Wood-Working_190476867893.html

Good work on the research Tim, but I think that one is the same as Spongerich's "gyro vise" in post #51 (also shown above). Correct me if I am wrong but I don't think that either one is a Wilton vise unless they bought the rights to make it at some point. The site info you give says that the Will-Burt Company was granted the patent to make it. That means anyone else making it would have to buy the rights from Will-Burt to make it unless they are Chinese. :)

Thanks again,
Steve

spongerich
01-20-2011, 07:44 PM
Good work on the research Tim, but I think that one is the same as Spongerich's "gyro vise" in post #51 (also shown above). Correct me if I am wrong but I don't think that either one is a Wilton vise unless they bought the rights to make it at some point. The site info you give says that the Will-Burt Company was granted the patent to make it. That means anyone else making it would have to buy the rights from Will-Burt to make it unless they are Chinese. :)

Thanks again,
Steve

They were definitely sold under the Columbian name. Don't know if that was pre-Wilton or not. Could have been a license or more likely a re-brand.

kc-steve
01-21-2011, 08:59 AM
They were definitely sold under the Columbian name. Don't know if that was pre-Wilton or not. Could have been a license or more likely a re-brand.

Speaking of the Columbian vise, anyone know when Columbian and Wilton combined? Apparently they did at some point because the current Wilton catalog shows the Wilton Columbian as trademark registered.

Thanks,
Steve

kc-steve
01-24-2011, 01:36 PM
I'm still wondering if ANYONE has a wild guess about when Wilton and Columbian vises merged.

Thanks,
Steve

Jayincali
01-24-2011, 03:36 PM
I'm in the market for a vise, this one on craigslist states its a Columbian vise, but the the ad says its a Wilton 4". Is Columbian a division or model of a Wilton vise? Also is this vise a good one to pick up for the price?

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv/tls/2174892039.html

autopts
01-24-2011, 03:49 PM
I'm still wondering if ANYONE has a wild guess about when Wilton and Columbian vises merged.

Thanks,
Steve

There wasn't a whole lot of media attention obviously paid to the Columbian aquisation by Wilton. It could be that Wilton only bought the Columbian Trademark as Columbian was closing its doors. I can't find anything documented. Have you ever been to viseparts.com? Looks like some of Reed and Columbian vise parts are interchangable.

Jayincali
01-24-2011, 03:59 PM
Duh.... I guess I should have read the previous post before I posted my dumb question LOL.

autopts
01-24-2011, 05:12 PM
I'm in the market for a vise, this one on craigslist states its a Columbian vise, but the the ad says its a Wilton 4". Is Columbian a division or model of a Wilton vise? Also is this vise a good one to pick up for the price?

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv/tls/2174892039.html

That a nice stationary vise, a Columbian, however the jaws might not be replaceable. Ask for a close photo of the jaws.

SWA Guy
01-24-2011, 11:14 PM
Well this seems an appropriate place to post pics of my latest acquisition along with a couple of questions. This 5" Wilton vise appears to be all original and is in good condition.

Overall:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-01.jpg

Other side:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-02.jpg

Date code of 10-45. Based on information above and what I have read elsewhere, this is the warranty expiration date. But this couldn't have been manufactured in 10/1940! This one is newer than the "Pat Pending" castings. Something isn't adding up for me. Can anyone help clarify this at all?
http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-03.jpg

And here is the remnants of some sort of decal or sticker. Maybe a Dealer's?
http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-04.jpg

Thanks for any help that you can provide.

Guy

autopts
01-24-2011, 11:46 PM
Well this seems an appropriate place to post pics of my latest acquisition along with a couple of questions. This 5" Wilton vise appears to be all original and is in good condition.

Overall:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-01.jpg


Date code of 10-45. Based on information above and what I have read elsewhere, this is the warranty expiration date. But this couldn't have been manufactured in 10/1940! This one is newer than the "Pat Pending" castings. Something isn't adding up for me. Can anyone help clarify this at all?
http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-03.jpg

And here is the remnants of some sort of decal or sticker. Maybe a Dealer's?
http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-04.jpg

Thanks for any help that you can provide.

Guy

You are right!! Its original and its a beauty!! Alot of early Wiltons have the month and year it was made. I believe in 1940 Wilton was in its infincy. Thats definitely a piece of work!!

kc-steve
01-25-2011, 12:05 AM
Yup, that's a BEAUTY and 1940 as well. Wanna sell it? :)

I got a question though, what model is that? There is a model number circled on the photo I modified below.

Thanks,
Steve

SWA Guy
01-25-2011, 01:02 AM
Steve,

By my eye it looks like "J-6", or "J-C". I'll have to do a little tiny scrape to see if there's a paint blob in the way.

http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-05.jpg

Here are the jaws. They almost certainly aren't original, right?

http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/wilton5-07.jpg

Thanks,

Guy



Yup, that's a BEAUTY and 1940 as well. Wanna sell it? :)

I got a question though, what model is that? There is a model number circled on the photo I modified below.

Thanks,
Steve

autopts
01-25-2011, 09:05 AM
Yup, that's a BEAUTY and 1940 as well. Wanna sell it? :)

I got a question though, what model is that? There is a model number circled on the photo I modified below.

Thanks,
Steve

Steve
I think that vise was made in 1945. Their 5 year guarantee program in which Wilton stamped the month, date with the words "GUARANTEED" on the keyway didn't last long. Wilton was expanding and now selling to stocking dealers and major Hardware stores. Their vises were now in sitting in someone's inventory and the guarantee date was clicking away. Wilton just decided to just put the current date on them. If it doesn't say the actual word on the keyway, then its the date that vise was actually made.
That vise as early as 1953 was called the 500S. Numbers on the early castings were hard to read due to early foundry casting problems. Back in 1945 I don't think some of their numbers and letter meant much. We need to find someone with a pre 1950 catalog

kc-steve
01-25-2011, 10:29 AM
Steve
I think that vise was made in 1945. Their 5 year guarantee program in which Wilton stamped the month, date with the words "GUARANTEED" on the keyway didn't last long. Wilton was expanding and now selling to stocking dealers and major Hardware stores. Their vises were now in sitting in someone's inventory and the guarantee date was clicking away. Wilton just decided to just put the current date on them. If it doesn't say the actual word on the keyway, then its the date that vise was actually made.
That vise as early as 1953 was called the 500S. Numbers on the early castings were hard to read due to early foundry casting problems. Back in 1945 I don't think some of their numbers and letter meant much. We need to find someone with a pre 1950 catalog

Autopts, you make some good points above. I have thought that stamping the date of the guarantee expiration was a bad move considering they might end up sitting unsold for months during a recession, therefore the warranty period would be shorter than normal. Back then we used to have economic recessions about every 4 years or so, give or take. But we do have 1941 (aka 1946) makes that had clear castings AND no mention of guarantee expiration on them. My model 930 has a very clean casting and stamped 9-46. There is also one posted here that does have "GUAR EXP" stamped on it though but no dates.

These dates might NOT be "hard and fast" rules of a fledgling (new) company while they were trying to get it together so to speak. It wouldn't be the first time for new companies, or even older companies. :)

Did you notice SWA Guy's vise jaws? They look pretty good and probably not original from my untrained eye.

I'll try calling Meier's again to see if someone has a catalog from the first 5 years or so. Besides I am also interested in seeing what they were calling the "bullet-style" vise back then. Was it a Machinist or Tradesman or both?

Thanks,
Steve

GreyOwl
01-25-2011, 10:45 AM
Are the swivel locks supposed to have a nut under them or have the lock bolts been replaced with longer ones?
Charles

kc-steve
01-25-2011, 11:12 AM
Are the swivel locks supposed to have a nut under them or have the lock bolts been replaced with longer ones?
Charles

I'll let Autopts, or one of the other technical experts answer that one. :)

But I am interested in also knowing when they changed from using a rounded-head nut to the more modern slide-handle nut for the swivel assembly lock-down.

Steve

SWA Guy
01-25-2011, 12:48 PM
Here's an odd Wilton Vise from the 1970s with a hinge-type mount. Anyone ever seen, or know anything about this odd fellow?

Also note below that Wilton is now (1970s) using the name "Wilton Corp."

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=3675916&id=40884&set=4

"Vise assembly"
Patentees: Walter Smierciak - Elgin, IL, Raymond H. Kartasuk - Lincolnwood, IL
US Patent: 3,675,916
Assignees: Wilton Corp. - Schiller Park, IL
Applied: Sep. 21, 1970
Granted: Jul. 11, 1972

Thanks,
Steve


Steve,
I just found this listing in Wilton Catalog #1100, no date on the catalog though.
Guy

http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/vise.jpg

autopts
01-25-2011, 12:59 PM
Are the swivel locks supposed to have a nut under them or have the lock bolts been replaced with longer ones?
Charles

Ok guys, Wilton used that straight line jaw in the 1st production bench vises from their opening until the early 50's. Then they inroduced what they called them "Steel Diamond Jaws" which are the serrated as we know today. Those straight line are original to that and any vise 1952 and older. The hex type lock downs with the 5/16" swivel handle also were used very early on and bent easily. By around the late 50's into the 60's they strengthend the handle and made the hex type with a 3/8" bar. By the middle later 60's, Wilton started phasing out their hex handles replacing them with the typical handle they are using today. Today's handles were made here until the 70's and are now inported and are made in China. You can tell the difference between US and China Handles. Wilton, Probably over produced that handle in China to cut costs so I'm guessing those handles will be around for a long time.

kc-steve
01-26-2011, 11:30 AM
Steve,
I just found this listing in Wilton Catalog #1100, no date on the catalog though.
Guy

http://toolsandworkshops.com/Sales/vise.jpg

AWESOME! We have a model name for that one now, the FLIP-GRIP. Also looks like it has several functions as well.

Nice work SWA Guy!

Thanks,
Steve

spongerich
01-26-2011, 03:54 PM
You might find the Columbian acquisition date by starting at the beginning and tracing breadcrumbs...

http://www2.sos.state.oh.us/pls/bsqry/f?p=100:1:1209763309717294::NO:1:P1_TYPE:NAME

A search of Columbian Hardware shows them starting up in OH in 1926.

kc-steve
01-27-2011, 09:02 AM
You might find the Columbian acquisition date by starting at the beginning and tracing breadcrumbs...

http://www2.sos.state.oh.us/pls/bsqry/f?p=100:1:1209763309717294::NO:1:P1_TYPE:NAME

A search of Columbian Hardware shows them starting up in OH in 1926.

Thanks Spongerich, I checked it out and found that Columbian Vise & Mfg Company died a quiet "death" the 31st of December, 1972, when it was legally merged with the Warren Tool Corporation of Ohio.

There is no mention of Wilton and that makes me think that Wilton's management must have offered to purchase the trademark rights at some point later from Warren Tool. (see copies of attached docs)

Thanks again,
Steve

kc-steve
01-27-2011, 12:00 PM
Just found some new info about the Wilton/Columbian connection. I was just talking to the owner/manager of Harry Epstein Company (http://store.harryepstein.com/) and heard that they were a major dealer of the Columbian vises back in the late 1980s early 1990s, in fact they were at one time prior to the Meier Co ownership, THE parts distributor for those east of the Mississippi river. Meier Company then decided not to allow Epstein that distinction later though, leaving them with a pile of unsold Columbian parts. Meier Company seems to have stepped on a few toes in the past and that might explain why they don't wish to openly discuss Wilton's history. They are always welcome to refute the info here though. :)

Therefore, the Warren Tool Corp continued selling the Columbian vises from 1973 to well into the 1980s if I recall what he said correctly. It was around the late 1980s or early 1990s that Wilton "merged" with Warren Tool Corp, and Wilton was the dominant company of the two. This was approximately when Wilton started manufacturing their version of the "Columbian" vise.

And needless to say, while at Epstein's I couldn't resist buying some new tools. :)

Steve

autopts
01-27-2011, 09:29 PM
You might find the Columbian acquisition date by starting at the beginning and tracing breadcrumbs...

http://www2.sos.state.oh.us/pls/bsqry/f?p=100:1:1209763309717294::NO:1:P1_TYPE:NAME

A search of Columbian Hardware shows them starting up in OH in 1926.

Nice find on that site spongerich! I wish Illinois had a site to find past business filings.

airbuff101
01-27-2011, 11:00 PM
This might help clarify Columbian/Warren connection in the 80's-early 90's somewhat.
87 Catalog (Ken-Tool Warren Tool group)
93 is the latest price list I have and it appears that all vises are still offered at the time. US made models pictured. They had 2 light import (Taiwan) vises at the time also. Wilton has no connection at this time.
Rob

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3223.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3225.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3227.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3226.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3228.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3224.jpg

autopts
01-28-2011, 09:49 AM
[QUOTE=airbuff101;1312978]This might help clarify Columbian/Warren connection in the 80's-early 90's somewhat.
87 Catalog (Ken-Tool Warren Tool group)
93 is the latest price list I have and it appears that all vises are still offered at the time. US made models pictured. They had 2 light import (Taiwan) vises at the time also. Wilton has no connection at this time.
Rob

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3223.jpg

Well thats a major piece in the history of Columbian Vises. In just a few days you all have found out they opened their doors in 1926, assets bought by Warren Tool in 1972, and went on to be distributed by Ken Tool thru the 80's. In just a few days you've put together the time line of a major player in the 20th Century vise Mfg. Great work. Oh, how did Wilton come about getting their name?

kc-steve
01-28-2011, 04:17 PM
Thanks Rob (airbuff101), that helps us with the dates.

I found something in a new search of that Ohio site but I'm not sure it means anything. The ONLY thing that is recognizable in the attached document is that Warren Tool GROUP (notice the name change) has filed documents to do business in Ohio as a foreign corporation, BUT near the bottom it says they manufacture vises. Very confusing since there isn't anything telling us more.

Speculation: It could be Warren Tool Corp was bought up by a foreign company, changed its name, and now wants to legally conduct business in Ohio.

This has an October 1994 date on it. And it also mentions that CT Corporation System of Cleveland is the "statutory agent," whatever that means.

Steve

90roadster
02-14-2011, 01:37 AM
this is a very interesting thread, im currently restoring a wilton my self, haven't been able to find another like this, although it does seem to be pretty basic. Vise is stamped Schiller Park ILL, any info would be appreciated
http://mob17.photobucket.com/albums/b69/tpod/photo.jpg

airbuff101
02-14-2011, 09:16 AM
Roadster,
That looks to me like a 645 Utility Vise. I've had one for 25 years of pretty heavy/frequent use and it has been a fine vise (just doesn't have the panache of the more well known series).
Mine says made in USA and has the same WILTON cast in.

I've had C-series and refurbished a 1750,1760 and older U.S.745 Mechanics vise but have never felt "under-vised" with the plain jane 645.
You'll get good service for decades.
Rob

90roadster
02-14-2011, 09:45 AM
thanks for reply, you are right there is 645 stamped on it. Any idea what year this could be from? I will post pictures later of it all done,

Lump
02-14-2011, 10:46 AM
I have an uncommon Wilton vise item. (Or at least, I haven't seen another one like it). :dunno:

It's an original cardboard box for a Wilton Shop King vise. It shows the Schiller Park address, which should help a bit with determining its age. Also, the shipping label on the other end lists the addressee as Dayton Hardware & Supply on Irwin St (that's Dayton, Ohio). It shows a pre-zip-code address for Dayton Hardware (pre-1963, therefore). So it becomes possible to narrow down the age of this box a bit with those two pieces of evidence.
http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm222/Lilump/Tools%20n%20Garage%20Stuff/BoxWiltonvise1.jpg

The box is dusty, dirty, and distorted with age and abuse. I don't have a Wilton vise, though. Anyone want it? How 'bout $5 and shipping costs? Anyone?

airbuff101
02-14-2011, 11:13 AM
thanks for reply, you are right there is 645 stamped on it. Any idea what year this could be from? I will post pictures later of it all done,

Well, mine was new in probably 87-88 I think. It does not say Schiller park though so yours is likely a bit older.
Rob

dirtrider
02-14-2011, 12:57 PM
this is a very interesting thread, im currently restoring a wilton my self, haven't been able to find another like this, although it does seem to be pretty basic. Vise is stamped Schiller Park ILL, any info would be appreciated
http://mob17.photobucket.com/albums/b69/tpod/photo.jpg

I have what appears to be a very similar vise as you have that I just currently restored.It's nothing fancy but it works fine for me, Mine also says Schiller Park ILL on it as well. But I think mine was made late 70's early 80's. But any info I can get on this vise is welcomed thanks.

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=951&pictureid=7730

http://garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=951&pictureid=7731

spongerich
02-14-2011, 09:23 PM
Anyone else notice this Wilton on eBay this week?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200574216860&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

Seller says it's "Magnesium or Aluminum"
It's a 4" Bullet and weighs only 13.5 lbs.

jride200
02-14-2011, 09:27 PM
My guess: salesman's 'tool', for trade-shows, etc. This, seeing as though there's not a salesman I've met, who can pickup anything heavier than a golf club.

kc-steve
02-14-2011, 11:22 PM
Wow! The bidders have that vise up to $183 with 2 minutes left. So much money for non-intrinsic value being aluminum-magnesium. I guess they plan to use it as a decorator piece. :)

Steve

spongerich
02-15-2011, 10:44 AM
I thought it might be for non-sparking environments.

I was tempted even at $180... it's a pretty unique piece and with ordinary 4" Bullets going for $200 it didn't seem like a terrible deal.

Lump
02-15-2011, 12:07 PM
I thought it might be for non-sparking environments.

I was tempted even at $180... it's a pretty unique piece and with ordinary 4" Bullets going for $200 it didn't seem like a terrible deal.

I too find this thing interesting. I don't really think the "non spark" environment would be the best explanation. It seems to me that the steel jaws would be the most likely place for a spark to occur anyway. I wondered if the weight might be the chief consideration. Perhaps it was designed to be used on some kind of large military aircraft for emergency field repairs, or some lightweight repair boat or something? Who knows? :headscrat

Interesting, nevertheless.

autopts
02-16-2011, 09:45 AM
Anyone else notice this Wilton on eBay this week?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200574216860&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

Seller says it's "Magnesium or Aluminum"
It's a 4" Bullet and weighs only 13.5 lbs.

Yes, it could have been a salesman model. The jaw style dates it back to the 40's, maybe up to 52.

PinkLinc
02-16-2011, 12:18 PM
Not sure if it's relevant to this thread, but here's a shot of my relatively new Wilton. It's probably about 3 years old and I got it for about $60. There's no COO marked that I can see, but I'm pretty sure it's foreign made.

I have no complaints. I've done plenty of pounding on it and I'm sure the bench will break before the vise does. I really like the ability to swivel the jaws and the base. That feature comes in very handy.

airbuff101
02-16-2011, 02:28 PM
I have what appears to be a very similar vise as you have that I just currently restored.It's nothing fancy but it works fine for me, Mine also says Schiller Park ILL on it as well. But I think mine was made late 70's early 80's. But any info I can get on this vise is welcomed thanks.

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=951&pictureid=7730

http://garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=951&pictureid=7731

Well here's a little more on the 640 series.
First yellowish pic from a 1970 WD catalog showing the same early casting as Dirtriders above.
Next pics from a early to mid 80's Wilton Catalog that shows a definite change in style and casting from the 1970 version. I have this style 645 and it still says made in USA cast on side. Looks like this change took place between 1970 and 1985.
The 1970 version also has the replaceable stamped pipe jaws while the later has cast in.
Rob
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3328.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3330.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/airbuff101/Toolstuff/dadworkpics3329.jpg

90roadster
02-17-2011, 02:28 PM
thanks for that last post, looks like mine is the earlier 70s model, i wish it had the features of dirtriders. I will take a closer look, it could be possible that the pipe jaws on mine disappeared along with the rotating base, it had a hard long life at the dealership. Will post pictures this weekend of it all assembled with new jaws made

90roadster
02-17-2011, 11:43 PM
not too happy with this color, but it will do for now
http://mob17.photobucket.com/albums/b69/tpod/wilton_restored2.jpg
http://mob17.photobucket.com/albums/b69/tpod/resotred_wiltonjpg.jpg

kc-steve
02-18-2011, 12:10 PM
not too happy with this color, but it will do for now . . .

It still looks GOOD all cleaned up and purdy. :)

I like the color "dirtrider" used on his at the top of the page though.

I just left an estate sale this morning with a "Craftsman" vise in hand and didn't really look at it closely because it was a mad house of people grabbing stuff to buy. On closer inspection at home, it turns out to be a dead-ringer for the Wilton Torco. I'm sure Wilton made it for Craftsman because Craftsman doesn't manufacture tools. But I am pleased to say it was $12 and the 4" vise opens smoothly and closes properly. :bounce:

It's a keeper. :)

Steve

kc-steve
02-18-2011, 12:53 PM
Oops, correction, the 640 series, not the Torco. :D

Thanks Rob!

Steve

dirtrider
02-18-2011, 09:14 PM
Thanks airbuff101 it looks like mine is one of the earlier models thank you for that info. I inherited my vice from a family member and the vice had been sitting in a drawer in the garage for probably close to 30-35 years. So it needed some work the jaws still don't go together perfectly even but it's good enough I only use it for light work. Although I'm still working on getting the handles perfectly straight as well, any ideas besides replacing them?

Kc-steve, - yeah I wanted to clean the vice up and make it look clean but at the same time keeping a somewhat original look.

surfer53
03-17-2011, 11:30 PM
Here is my Wilton Flip-Grip, early 70's marked pat pend.

Handiest1
05-10-2011, 01:16 AM
Correct me if I am wrong, but I think I found the patent for the "Columbian style" Wilton vise, US Patent: D154,001. It doesn't explicitly say that it is the Columbian though.

Applied: Nov. 12, 1947
Granted: May 31, 1949

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=D154001&id=40895&set=2

Steve
Just a quick note, and sorry if you already know this but there are 2 kinds of patents. Utility and design. A utility patent is for a process, or the way something gets done, and a design is simply that, and they start with a "D". I vise could get a design patent just because of it's unique zebra stripes. A utility patent is harder to get, and "stronger" in a court of law to protect your invention. You can tell I'm not a patent attorney, but I do own a utiity patent.

SWA Guy
05-10-2011, 02:10 AM
Well, I have the Wilton bug! I just love these vices!

I found this little baby 2" Wilton vice and PowrArm Jr. on another forum's For Sale section and was able to buy it. I was going to leave it all original, but the rust had taken it's toll.

As "found"
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton01.jpg

Here she is sitting on top of my all original 5" machinist vice made in 10/45.
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton03.jpg

A little closer:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton04.jpg

From above:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton05.jpg

A little closer yet. Notice the rust:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton06.jpg

Ouch!
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton07.jpg

Notice "Chicago USA", yet the date stamp on the keyway is "172" (which I presume is Jan, 1972?). Yet a little more confusion here:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton08.jpg

All cleaned up:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton12.jpg

With her new clothes:
http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton13.jpg

http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton14.jpg

http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton15.jpg

http://toolsandworkshops.com/owwm/Wilton16.jpg

I may use this little vice for very light work, but as you can see, she's not all beat up, and in her blue paint she really stands out. I will probably mount it on the end of one of my workbenches and use her as a conversation piece.

I am now restoring the PowrArm Jr. to mount it on. More pictures later.

Guy in Sacramento

Lump
05-10-2011, 08:33 AM
It's gorgeous, guy!

kc-steve
05-10-2011, 09:04 AM
Well, I have the Wilton bug! I just love these vices!

I found this little baby 2" Wilton vice and PowrArm Jr. on another forum's For Sale section and was able to buy it. I was going to leave it all original, but the rust had taken it's toll.


Notice "Chicago USA", yet the date stamp on the keyway is "172" (which I presume is Jan, 1972?). Yet a little more confusion here:

Guy in Sacramento

Awesome vise there Guy! Yeah, we never REALLY have determined how those date codes are deciphered yet, but I think everyone agrees if it has "Chicago" in the casting then it was made prior to 1957.

Some date code differences include the hyphen or dash. In other words, if the date code is "1-49" then it usually matches the casting better than a date code of "149."

Just Guessing: We don't know the specific history of a specific vise, so I guess it is possible that a vise has been sent in for repair at a later date. That could easily explain the differences if it is true that the dynamic jaw was replaced later. Back in the day, people were more likely to repair something than replace it. :)

Steve

autopts
05-10-2011, 09:37 AM
Awesome vise there Guy! Yeah, we never REALLY have determined how those date codes are deciphered yet, but I think everyone agrees if it has "Chicago" in the casting then it was made prior to 1957.

Some date code differences include the hyphen or dash. In other words, if the date code is "1-49" then it usually matches the casting better than a date code of "149."

Just Guessing: We don't know the specific history of a specific vise, so I guess it is possible that a vise has been sent in for repair at a later date. That could easily explain the differences if it is true that the dynamic jaw was replaced later. Back in the day, people were more likely to repair something than replace it. :)

Steve

Steve, Wilton made so many of those 2" castings when they had their factory in Chicago that they ended up taking them to Schiller Park. The keyways were unmarked and the they stamped the date when it was actually sold and boxed at their Schiller Pk. plant.

kc-steve
05-10-2011, 10:01 AM
Steve, Wilton made so many of those 2" castings when they had their factory in Chicago that they ended up taking them to Schiller Park. The keyways were unmarked and the they stamped the date when it was actually sold and boxed at their Schiller Pk. plant.

Thanks Nick. You have much more knowledge on this than I do, but David had a large 5" I believe that the casting said "Chicago" and the dynamic jaw was stamped with something like "172" also. Like I said, I was just guessing though.

Steve

SWA Guy
05-10-2011, 11:59 AM
Yeah that's kind of what I thought. I don't recall ever seeing a baby 2" Wilton with a Schiller Park casting, only "Chicago".

Thanks for the info! I love this thread!

Guy




Steve, Wilton made so many of those 2" castings when they had their factory in Chicago that they ended up taking them to Schiller Park. The keyways were unmarked and the they stamped the date when it was actually sold and boxed at their Schiller Pk. plant.

old salvage
05-10-2011, 12:40 PM
Steve, Wilton made so many of those 2" castings when they had their factory in Chicago that they ended up taking them to Schiller Park. The keyways were unmarked and the they stamped the date when it was actually sold and boxed at their Schiller Pk. plant.

That makes sense. I occasionally see Brown & Sharpe micrometers with both Providence and North Kingstown stamps.

SWA Guy
05-10-2011, 12:59 PM
Frank, that's a sweet little vise! I will probably use mine as well, but only for very light duty and nothing that will threaten it's condition. I have other vises that I can beat on and not worry about. In my mind my little baby Wilton is like a piece of workshop jewelry. While everything around it is gray and grungy, the little Wilton shines!

Guy



Sweet!

I use junior all the time.

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=82089&d=1287949960

autopts
05-10-2011, 05:25 PM
Thanks Nick. You have much more knowledge on this than I do, but David had a large 5" I believe that the casting said "Chicago" and the dynamic jaw was stamped with something like "172" also. Like I said, I was just guessing though.

Steve

On the Chicago castings, the number is on the body side usually under the jaw. The late 1940's and some early 50's had no # stamped that meant anything. Wilton didn't get a unfied numbering system until around the mid 50's.

kc-steve
05-10-2011, 06:22 PM
On the Chicago castings, the number is on the body side usually under the jaw. The late 1940's and some early 50's had no # stamped that meant anything. Wilton didn't get a unfied numbering system until around the mid 50's.

I think you misunderstood me. I wasn't referring to the model number casting. I was referring to the stamp on the dynamic jaw keyway. DavidB had a 4" or 5" one just like SWA Guy's and the stamp had no hyphen or dash like most have. Example: 172 versus 1-72. It was on a thread he started though and I don't have time to look for it. We didn't know why that was and his was a "Chicago" casting as well. I only guessed that maybe it had been repaired in 1972.

But it is good to know that the 2" vises were never made at Schiller Park.

Thanks,
Steve

MattT
05-10-2011, 08:56 PM
Got a few (bad) pics of Wiltons in old MAC catalogs for y'all.

1951.

http://files.myopera.com/matt38922/albums/4608042/DCP00548.JPG

1953.

http://files.myopera.com/matt38922/albums/4608042/DCP00549.JPG

1957.

http://files.myopera.com/matt38922/albums/4608042/DCP00551.JPG

http://files.myopera.com/matt38922/albums/4608042/DCP00552.JPG

1963.

http://files.myopera.com/matt38922/albums/4608042/DCP00554.JPG

http://files.myopera.com/matt38922/albums/4608042/DCP00555.JPG

Looks like Wilton were high dollar even back then. In '63 price list the 5" H.D. mechanics vise is $34.95 and the bullet like Cadet is $62.50. There is also a 5" Littlestown in the same catalog and it's only $17.90.

autopts
05-10-2011, 09:51 PM
I think you misunderstood me. I wasn't referring to the model number casting. I was referring to the stamp on the dynamic jaw keyway. DavidB had a 4" or 5" one just like SWA Guy's and the stamp had no hyphen or dash like most have. Example: 172 versus 1-72. It was on a thread he started though and I don't have time to look for it. We didn't know why that was and his was a "Chicago" casting as well. I only guessed that maybe it had been repaired in 1972.

But it is good to know that the 2" vises were never made at Schiller Park.

Thanks,
Steve

Oh, the keyway, yes 172 I'd lay money is 1-72. They often left out the dashes. Funny, there must be an x Wilton employee that reads these threads. You would think one of them would speak up!

kc-steve
05-10-2011, 10:02 PM
Oh, the keyway, yes 172 I'd lay money is 1-72. They often left out the dashes. Funny, there must be an x Wilton employee that reads these threads. You would think one of them would speak up!

Ha-ha! yeah you would think so. With your help as well as others here I think it is safe to say this thread is the best information about Wilton Vise History on the Internet though! :)

Thanks,
Steve

Catalyze
05-11-2011, 01:16 AM
The hyphen guy was on vacation for a few weeks every year. At least he wasn't there on the date my keyway was stamped:
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=981&pictureid=8145

Craig

crankshaftdan II
06-16-2011, 11:23 AM
I've got one of those, haven't done anything with it yet. Not real heavy duty but kind of cool. I think I gave around 5 bucks for it.
http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss253/thosewitts/101_0485.jpg
http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss253/thosewitts/101_0486.jpg
http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss253/thosewitts/101_0488.jpg

Jim

This is pictures of my wilton, the part numbers show up-however there was only a decal on the right inset that did not survive the clean-up! The only other # is a 2 that you can make out on the main body part. Don't really know if that might be the model #. Was undr the impression that this was called a model maker's or gunmaker's vise? One was listed on flea bay for $430.00-any taker's here? I'll do a 30% GJ-flashing blue light special discount!!! Yours........Cranky

kc-steve
07-16-2011, 09:15 AM
The Wilton History webpage is FINALLY online now, and also reference my "Friends at Garage Journal" as a primary source of information.
http://junkyardtools.com/tool_history/wilton

Thanks all for your XLNT information. And changes will be made as time goes on. Google likes changes. :)

Steve

waltinbatonrouge
07-29-2011, 07:05 PM
Hi Gents..Its been a pleasure reading though your Wilton thread.
I do a lot of mechanic work as a hobby. Right now its 2 Yamaha Grizzly 4 wheelers

If you'd care to look at a basketcase rebuild

http://s777.photobucket.com/albums/yy59/waltinbatonrouge/2005%20Kodiak%20450/

Anyway, I inherited a Wilton CO that I'm wondering about.
I looked for a date on the slide, nothing there, but there is a casting number 101055

It's missing a set of pipe jaws (old style with the set screw) one of the tie downs is broken. I'd also love to find the 2 rubber bumpers for the handle and a tailpiece cover.

Might anyone have any idea as to the approximate date of manufacture of the vise? ..

and where i might find the parts? I called Wilton and they weren't much help on the old vises
However I did PM Nick (autopts) he was very quick to respond, and mentioned that the new pipe jaws would fit with the slightest bit of modification.

But any other thoughts or advise would be much appreciated..

Its apart for cleaning and bead blasting , but here are a few pics..thanks very much

waltinbatonrouge

autopts
07-29-2011, 08:23 PM
I believe if a set screw holds in the pipe jaws its late 60's thru the 70's. After that they were held in with a clip in back. Before that, they were held in with 2 pins. The stamper mush have had a day off. Here's some Wilton trivia, if you take that keyway off and its held on with very small allan head screws, the stamped date should also be on the other side also.

waltinbatonrouge
07-29-2011, 09:04 PM
thanks Nick! the key is held on with 2 drift pins. Under the key were 3 pieces of broken saw blade used as shims....no date on either side of the key, even with my wife's 10x jewelers loop ..thinking this may have been worked on some time ago..the key has scratches across the direction of travel..maybe it was replaced, or maybe it was a Friday afternoon at Wilton... see pics.

Anyway..I'm imagining it was in a mechanics shop when I was in high school...so I'll blast it paint it up and use it..if i need a .010 shim under the key to tighten the vise up not a problem, at least it won't self destruct like my Chinese Columbian!!!

waltinbatonrouge
08-14-2011, 05:29 PM
Hi Nick...i bead-blasted the C0, calipered the ID and OD and put 2 .016 brass shims under the key, new drift pins and a 1 1/4" knockout plug from an electrical panel fits the hole in the back of the spindle perfectly ...the spindle has about .040 runout at the handle end but I think i can live with that ..it'll just eventually wear down at the allen head screws...and is already starting to smooth out.
... I think i found some pipe jaws at grainger...

Its a great vise..thanks again for your help

autopts
08-14-2011, 09:52 PM
Hi Nick...i bead-blasted the C0, calipered the ID and OD and put 2 .016 brass shims under the key, new drift pins and a 1 1/4" knockout plug from an electrical panel fits the hole in the back of the spindle perfectly ...the spindle has about .040 runout at the handle end but I think i can live with that ..it'll just eventually wear down the allen head screws...and is already starting to smooth out.
... I think i found some pipe jaws at grainger...

Its a great vise..thanks again for your help

Oh!! Thats nice!! Thats certainly a piece of functional art. I didn't know you already had one pipe jaw, maybe another half is out there somewhere. Those pipe jaws are pricey!

waltinbatonrouge
08-14-2011, 10:16 PM
Hi backatcha..no the angle on the first pic makes it look like one pipe jaw is inplace but they are both missing...

But since were on that subject, So if i remove the clip from the new style CO pipe jaws, they should fit right in and lock down with the set screw, without any machine work, correct?

thanks again!

autopts
08-14-2011, 11:06 PM
Hi backatcha..no the angle on the first pic makes it look like one pipe jaw is inplace but they are both missing...

But since were on that subject, So if i remove the clip from the new style CO pipe jaws, they should fit right in and lock down with the set screw, without any machine work, correct?

thanks again!

Yes, the pipe jaws never changed except for the back clip on the C-1,2, & 3, I'm guessing that that also holds true on the C-0. Wilton won't tell you either. They claim they shredded all their old info. If it was myself, I'd take the chance.

waltinbatonrouge
08-20-2011, 11:24 AM
..ooops! i can see that I am posting off topic here...if any of the administrators want to move my posts to a more appropriate "Wilton restorers" thread, please do!

sorry 'bout that!

walt

RobRace10
10-01-2011, 12:06 AM
So anybody really want Wilton history? I worked there for 27 years until the foreigners who bought them decided that they don't need knowledgeable people working for them any longer. That is why nobody at the new company have any real knowledge about the vises, it's just another product to them.


It is true that there are Wilton reunions as there were a bunch of really good, dedicated people in it's hayday.

I was there when they acquired Warren Tool, I'm going to say probably about 1994, primarily to get into the retail business and buy up a competitor. Ken Tool was kept by the owners of Warren Tool and continued to buy Columbian vises from Wilton for about 10 years. This purchase of Warren was the beginning of the downfall in my opinion, grandiose plans to sell the big box stores and forsake their roots.

Hugh Vogl started Wilton, he came from the Czech Republic and Wilton started making handles for department store boxes back in the 30's called the "Carry Pack" handle. When WWII came along they began making vises. I believe Hugh had worked for a vise company in the Check republic and you can see the similarities of the Wilton vises if you Google York vise.

His son, Alex and Bill Ferrick built the business at Wilton from the 40's to the 80's. Bill Ferrick hired me back in the early 80's.

There are very few people left who really know the story and history. They made great products for a lot of years.

So I can try and check every once in awhile or PM if you want more info.


http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n295/RobRace10/Jewlersvise2.jpg

SWA Guy
10-01-2011, 12:14 AM
Rob,

That's fantastic! As you may have guessed, there are some pretty fanatic Wilton vise fans here. If you read through the previous messages in this thread, you'll see how much we appreciate good old American made quality tools. Wilton vises in this example. You are among friends here.

Do you have any original manuals, historical documents, photos or anything else Wilton related that you could feed to this Wilton crowd?

Welcome aboard,

Guy in Sacramento

SWA Guy
10-01-2011, 12:18 AM
This just up on eBay - 250901725959

This is the very first 2" Wilton Baby Bullet vise that I have seen with the Schiller Park casting. Every other one that I have seen had the Chicago casting. Maybe I just lead a sheltered life...

autopts
10-01-2011, 01:06 AM
[QUOTE=RobRace10;1780579]So anybody really want Wilton history? I worked there for 27 years until the foreigners who bought them decided that they don't need knowledgeable people working for them any longer.
"So I can try and check every once in awhile or PM if you want more info."


Rob, we've been waiting forever for someone to come out. I was beginning to thnk all the Wilton employees, ex employees and retirees were sworn to a code of secrecy. We might bleed you to death with needed information. I've got a couple of questions if you don't mind.
1. When did Wilton Tool start to importing from China?
2. Wern't their early Tradsman vises made there?
3. Don't they continue to import many parts that go into vises from China even today?
4. It sems like Wilton and Jet had something going on even long before WMH bought them. Did the early Tacoma turn Wilton on to far East suppliers?
5. I could ask 25 questions easy, but lastly. What, in your estimation is the best vise made today? Welcome aboard

kc-steve
10-01-2011, 09:13 AM
Thanks Robert, I got your email and your PM. We always welcome information about Wilton. There are a few threads with bits and pieces scattered around GJ such as the York Vise (Czech) connection. I try to put it all together in an article on my website.

I will be updating my website soon so keep that info coming. :)

http://junkyardtools.com/tool_history/wilton

Steve

kc-steve
10-01-2011, 09:48 AM
I'll try to save Robert some time retyping what he wrote to me . . .


I won't have time today to go through your history, but will when I get some time. There also was Wilton Machinery division, Wilton Packaging, Wilton Engineered products, and Anderson Products (brushes). I believe the Engineered products is now owned again by Charles Vogl, who ran Wilton for the last few years before the various divisions were sold. Wilton Tool (vises) was sold to HTII (Hand Tool International Inc) with an interest by WMH. WMH bought Wilton Machinery and combined it with JET Equipment.

Wilton also sold back in the 70's some hydraulic vises to Monroe engineering and they continued to sell them under Wilton brand name.

(link removed by request)

Eventually HTII combined with WMH so what was left of Wilton was all part of WMH. The Vogls owned the plant in Schiller Park, and was not sold with Wilton. The Wilton signature (round channel) vises that are still made in the USA are contract manufactured by a company in Elgin, IL. The exception is the one they make for Sears is done in China and they may be trying to make some of the other ones in China now, but not sure of that. I can't tell you how many of us fought to keep those vises made in the USA as there was tremendous pressure from the owners in Switzerland to make them in China. All other Wilton vises come from China and a few small ones come from York CZ.

Not sure who bought Engineered products (trailer hubs and spindles), but Charles Vogl ended up getting that back and I believe he still has it today, but all mfg is done in China.

Got to go now.

autopts
10-01-2011, 11:34 AM
I'll try to save Robert some time retyping what he wrote to me . . .

Steve, Thats a great share! Thanks

RobRace10
10-02-2011, 10:10 AM
[QUOTE=RobRace10;1780579]So anybody really want Wilton history? I worked there for 27 years until the foreigners who bought them decided that they don't need knowledgeable people working for them any longer.
"So I can try and check every once in awhile or PM if you want more info."


Rob, we've been waiting forever for someone to come out. I was beginning to thnk all the Wilton employees, ex employees and retirees were sworn to a code of secrecy. We might bleed you to death with needed information. I've got a couple of questions if you don't mind.
1. When did Wilton Tool start to importing from China?
2. Wern't their early Tradsman vises made there?
3. Don't they continue to import many parts that go into vises from China even today?
4. It sems like Wilton and Jet had something going on even long before WMH bought them. Did the early Tacoma turn Wilton on to far East suppliers?
5. I could ask 25 questions easy, but lastly. What, in your estimation is the best vise made today? Welcome aboard


I'll try to answer a few questions:

None of us are sworn to secrecy about the questions being asked, but the same basic group of people ran Wilton for decades, and all of that knowledge is now gone either at competitors or retired. It was a great place to work for a lot of us, but the business changed and the family atmosphere disappeared. I was involved in and personally came up with some of the improvements to the Wilton round channel vises over the years and fought hard for keeping those made in the USA.


1) Wilton started bring product in from China to compete in the retail market I would say around 1997 or so. It was simply impossible to compete with the China products with a made in USA when you talk to the big box stores. They (the retailers) want price and brand names not necessarily the highest quality.

2)Early tradesman vises were never made in China. Up until the mid to late 90's There were no Wilton vises coming from China or components. There were some knockoff tradesman vises come in from China and or India, I can't remember which, but Wilton has a Trademark on the bullet shape and that is what has kept others from copying them as the patents ran out decades ago, but Trademarks never expire unless you don't actively go after infringements. The infringing companies were told to cease and desist.

3) As far as I know the USA vises are made entirely in the USA. There may have been a few small parts screws etc that came from other sources, but all the main parts for sure were USA.

4) Up until the sale of Wilton to HTII then the merge with Jet (owned by WMH), there was absolutely no relationship with JET as Wilton was a competitor and we sold against them. The Machinery division had been working for many years with other sources (Taiwan and Europe) many years before any vises were made over seas. .

5) The Wilton Combination vises are still the best for many reasons. The vises that Ridgid sells (Peddinhaus) are probably next in line against a Tradesman vise. They Ridgid vises aren't perfect, but they have large openings and use forgings in the front and back clamping portions which are stronger than castings.

kc-steve
10-02-2011, 11:03 AM
. . . 2)Early tradesman vises were never made in China. Up until the mid to late 90's There were no Wilton vises coming from China or components. There were some knockoff tradesman vises come in from China and or India, I can't remember which, but Wilton has a Trademark on the bullet shape and that is what has kept others from copying them as the patents ran out decades ago, but Trademarks never expire unless you don't actively go after infringements. The infringing companies were told to cease and desist.



Great info! That would also explain why York no longer makes their old style bullet. It was patented in CZ approximately 1938 or so, before Wilton's U.S. patent in 1941.

Steve

autopts
10-02-2011, 09:53 PM
[QUOTE=autopts;1780678]
I'll try to answer a few questions:

"2)Early tradesman vises were never made in China. Up until the mid to late 90's There were no Wilton vises coming from China or components".

"3) As far as I know the USA vises are made entirely in the USA. There may have been a few small parts screws etc that came from other sources, but all the main parts for sure were USA".
"5) The Wilton Combination vises are still the best for many reasons. The vises that Ridgid sells (Peddinhaus) are probably next in line against a Tradesman vise"..

Rob, you are so kind in answering my questions. I'm confused as to why Wilton left their casting free from C.O.O on their 1740's, 1750's and some 1760's all thru the later 70's & 80's and just left a sticker on the side stating that their main office was in Palatine Il. Your mention of Wilton's C-Series as being top notch, and you feel their Tradesman is next in line? Is their something about the Wilton machinist series you know that we don't?
Thanks for your time.
Nick

ert01
10-03-2011, 01:16 AM
Just wanted to share my latest purchase...

I am fairly new to the whole Wilton vise fan club and I'm still eager to learn more. The stamp on the bottom, is that the manufacture date or the warranty expiry date? I've heard both mentioned.

Also is my vise an 8400 or a 9400? It looks like 8400 is stamped into the steel on the movable jaw but I'm quite sure it has 9400 on the static jaw side. Can anyone comment on those markings?

Jaw width is 4".

Also interesting to note are the aluminum jaw protectors. It looks like they were made out of some angle aluminum and hammered to match the shape of the jaws. Those aluminum protectors are actually the reason I was able to buy this vise... The old farmer that had it said he was always worried about losing those so he never really used the vise. He's retiring and moving to the city for health reasons and figured he could only take one vise with him and he decided he'd take the one he used most on the farm... An old beat up Record. So he sold me this one in great shape for $40.

Everything moves tight and smooth and there's no cracks or serious rust or even bad hammer marks or cuts or anything. I'm quite happy with it so far.

kc-steve
10-03-2011, 03:35 PM
ert01, I'd say you made an XLNT deal on that for $40! Based on the date of 3-53 I would say that is the warranty expiration date meaning your vise was manufactured in 1948. In my opinion, it was much later when Wilton went to the actual date of production, maybe like after 1958 or so. BTW, I use similar jaw protectors that I just cut from hot-rolled angle iron, nothing special. I use them mainly to protect the work piece rather than the jaws and you can make 'em yourself all day long. :)

Thanks for sharing,
Steve

autopts
10-03-2011, 04:45 PM
http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae325/autopts71045/4inchWiltonVises4.jpg

These are the 4 generations of 4" machinist type since the 40's. On the far left with their lowboy, 1st generation. Its a Pat. Pending No. 4. Second is early late 40's & 50's with their 9400, then came the later style 9400/101028 and todays 400S. You won't see them all together like this often.

RobRace10
10-03-2011, 10:48 PM
[QUOTE=RobRace10;1782682]





Rob, you are so kind in answering my questions. I'm confused as to why Wilton left their casting free from C.O.O on their 1740's, 1750's and some 1760's all thru the later 70's & 80's and just left a sticker on the side stating that their main office was in Palatine Il. Your mention of Wilton's C-Series as being top notch, and you feel their Tradesman is next in line? Is their something about the Wilton machinist series you know that we don't?
Thanks for your time.
Nick

The reason the names were no longer cast in the sides of the Tradesman vises is because of private brand customers, The cost of pouring separate castings for those customers would have added a lot of cost in inventory. So the vises began having the cavity on the side so that more than one brand could use the same castings and then have a label put into it and other paint options. I believe if a product is made in the USA, it does not have to be marked made in USA for sale in the US. I'm positive that the castings for the Tradesman vises were never made in the Far East. Where they are made in the last couple years, I have no knowledge of, but I assume still USA. It was very easy for China to make grey iron castings, but pouring Ductile Iron was not and still not easy for China to do.



Wilton Machinist vises are also great vises, but they do not have pipe jaws and the height from the slide bar to the jaws is not as high as the other series. The Combination vises have the most mass at the front and back castings and their pipe jaws are much better than those on the Tradesman line. If you want big capacity, the Combination series vises fit the bill as they, have bigger height between the jaws and the slide bar and larger openings.

The Machinist and Combinations vises use steel jaws, Tradesman vises use powdered metal jaws. While the powdered metal aren't bad the steel jaws are better. Same difference on the pipe jaws.

The Machinist vises are probably stronger than the Tradesman Vises, but for the average car mechanic etc the Tradesman is a really nice vise. I have one 1760 and a 1755 for my own use and I could have had any I wanted, but for the size and features they work well. If your working on trucks and large items a C-1 or C-2 would be better. The C-3 is really big as I recall about 150Lbs, so you need to do some series work.

Wilton also had or may still have an 8"' Machinist vise. Sometimes people would call and order the biggest vise Wilton had, that would be the 800S. I would have customer service call the companies back if they were ordered as most people do not realize how big a 248 Lb vise is. Many people were shocked when they 800S vises would show up as they were quite a big hunk of metal and probably half of them would get shipped back because they were so big.

All three series use the same Ductile Iron in their castings, so it's just mass and features that make the difference.

kc-steve
10-04-2011, 12:22 AM
. . . The Machinist vises are probably stronger than the Tradesman Vises, but for the average car mechanic etc the Tradesman is a really nice vise. I have one 1760 and a 1755 for my own use and I could have had any I wanted, but for the size and features they work well. If your working on trucks and large items a C-1 or C-2 would be better. The C-3 is really big as I recall about 150Lbs, so you need to do some series work. . . .

All three series use the same Ductile Iron in their castings, so it's just mass and features that make the difference.

Please pardon my interruption, but I think Nick (aka autopts) is speaking from experience after seeing many broken C-series (and Tradesman?) vises in the real world. While I still respect your opinion, your side of the debate is focused more on features.

And it is probably true that auto mechanics prefer a vise with pipe jaws as well as the ability to beat the crap out of them, but I don't think machinists would agree with you at all. In fact, machinists generally look down on "lowly" vises with pipe jaws and anvils.

Overall the different trades, all vise users, I think the Machinist is without doubt the preferred vise. The rounded design was even recognized by the ancient Romans as having additional strength compared to squared designs when they built their arches.

But now days, I think the Machinist's Bullet has taken on a cult following that will last a long time.

Just some thoughts, :)
Steve

RobRace10
10-04-2011, 03:50 PM
There are probably more broken tradesman and combination vises because of the applications rather than the vise itself. Machinists vise are meant for Machinists typically a user who would not be using sledge hammers on parts held in it etc and they don't need the throat depth. I remember getting warranty claims on C-3 vises, we sent someone out to inspect them as that was very unusual. Turns out they were mounted on the back of trucks and when another truck would get stuck in the mud, a big chain was wrapped in the vise and used to tow out stuck trucks and the vises would snap or bend. Also the lower profile of a Machinist vise makes the casting less likely to break than a combination vise.
They are all good vises, but for a mechanic, which I assumed more of the boards members would be, the Machinist would be a third pick, but for a machinist they would be the preferable vise. Just my opinion.

.

autopts
10-04-2011, 04:26 PM
I love this thread and Rob? Its great having you aboard. You are the only one that can provide us with an "insiders" view. I love all USA made Wiltons, some maybe more then others. I don't understand why someone would buy a new Wilton and mount them out, in the open, on a back of a truck. I do see them out there. It just seems like a waste. Years ago I sold a C-2 and the buyer said he didn't care out the paint, it was going on the back of his truck.

Lump
10-04-2011, 05:11 PM
Fascinating info, Rob. Thanks so much!

I can see one application where a low-profile vise would be desirable....I have back problems, so I made my work bench slightly higher than many, to avoid bending over. Therefore a low-profile vise would be convenient for me sometimes. On the other hand, I have caught the highly contagious "big vise fever" from infected members of Garage Journal, and will eventually have a monster on the other end of the same bench.

The insights you have provided are priceless. We vise-fanatics tend to speculate and guess at history, because we don't have access to it. Your experiences are like open windows into a world which is otherwise obscured from our view.

Thanks again! :beer:

airbuff101
10-04-2011, 08:11 PM
Rob,
Thank you for your very unique perspective on the Wilton products.
You've contributed excellent information.
It is much appreciated and I hope to read more in the future.
Stick around. :)

airbuff

L5wolvesf
12-05-2011, 01:04 PM
[QUOTE=autopts;1783925]

. . . Wilton left their casting free from C.O.O on their 1740's, 1750's . . .

The reason the names were no longer cast in the sides of the Tradesman vises is because of private brand customers, The cost of pouring separate castings for those customers would have added a lot of cost in inventory. So the vises began having the cavity on the side so that more than one brand could use the same castings and then have a label put into it and other paint options.

Hi,

New guy here. I just want to be sure I understand this statement correctly. Not all Wilton 1750 vices had Wilton cast into them? So the vice I have with 1750 cast into the static side could be a Wilton. Would it be OK with y’all if I post a pic here for an ID?

L

Steve Vincent
12-06-2011, 03:00 PM
Thank all of your for your time and effort in posting this information. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading all of your post and learning about these Wilton Vises.

During my recent education on Wilton's Machinist, I have had the opportunity to purchase two of Wilton's largest. What I have is the 101106 800N.

For those of you that would like to own one of the largest, if not the largest, Wilton Bullet Style vises, I have one or two for sale. I have also have a listing in the classified section of this forum. I threw out a price of $800.00 because I had to, but I am looking for offers.

Thanks again to all of the contributors and moderators of this site. I have, and will continue to enjoy your input.

Steve Vincent

autopts
12-07-2011, 03:54 PM
Thank all of your for your time and effort in posting this information. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading all of your post and learning about these Wilton Vises.

During my recent education on Wilton's Machinist, I have had the opportunity to purchase two of Wilton's largest. What I have is the 101106 800N.

I threw out a price of $800.00 because I had to, but I am looking for offers.

Steve Vincent

That I think is a fair price for a end user. Its hard to tell its size from the photo. Its Huge!!!

disaster1277
12-08-2011, 08:33 AM
really enjoyed all the work you' ve done learned more here than on the wilton web site i have a question about a wilton vise i purchased a few years back its a 2 1/2 in. machinest vise model # 825 about 2 in. below the static jaw thier is a small 1/2 in. long x 1/4 in. wide arrow head with the # 13 in the middle of the arrow head also on the top of the swivel base plate. serial # 101009 if anyone can shed some light on this it would be greatly appreciated. by the way i did contact wilton but no help.

Steve Vincent
12-08-2011, 02:27 PM
The Wilton 800N that I have for sale is also on ebay. Item #110791207793.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110791207793

Steve Vincent
12-12-2011, 12:11 PM
I have uploaded 4 additional photos to my Ebay listing for this vise.

If you would like to see any other details, please let me know.

Steve Vincent

super-bee_ski
12-12-2011, 03:49 PM
autopts:
That is an amazing photo of the "Wilton's" all lined up!
My short story to you all?
I moved to Edwards AFB CA May 1994. I had a "BIG" Starrett vice. Gorgeous but it got stolen. Now I'm restoring a 70 Hemi Superbee and I need a vice. I found a Wilton vice, Bullett Machinist, bought it for $20. Weighs about 90 lBs. It has no attachable jaw grip that fits on the Static Jaw. Also, the screws for the "static" jaw were "ground in" to the jaw itself. I'll send pics. But anyway;
autopts, you have some nice Vices all lined up their!
I'm having vice envy! :drool:
mark

Garyss.smith
12-12-2011, 07:34 PM
Mark

If you need parts autopts probably has them New and used for most wiltons

I just got a old Wilton 450s and he had all the missing parts I needed.

Now mine is de-rusted and primered and waiting for me to have a nice day so I can paint it.

Gary

autopts
12-13-2011, 01:28 PM
autopts:
That is an amazing photo of the "Wilton's" all lined up!
It has no attachable jaw grip that fits on the Static Jaw. Also, the screws for the "static" jaw were "ground in" to the jaw itself. I'll send pics. But anyway;
autopts, you have some nice Vices all lined up their!
I'm having vice envy! :drool:
mark

Thanks for the compliment Mark. !st, those broken screws are not hard to get out. Is the jaw support that the jaw rests on is still there or is it busted off? 2nd, you will need another vise (bolted down) to hold that body by the ends of the jaw towers so that the face with the broken screws are facing up. Center punching the centers of the broken screws are important, get yourself a sharp HHS 1/8" and drill slowly. High speed will burn the tip and also it will grab better, follow with a 3/16 bit. Its a piece of cake. If you need a nice used jaw, let me know.

pat82
12-17-2011, 08:52 PM
So I'm setting up my garage in a new place and a friend gave me an old Wilton #4 vise. It is pretty beat up but in working order other than a broken base. Do any of you Wilton vise experts know where i could get a base for one of these?

autopts
12-17-2011, 11:42 PM
If its the "Wilton Tool Co. No 4, you may not find a base. They quit making that vise in the early 40's. That was the 1st generation of Wiltons and I would keep it away from heavy duty holding. Decent for a collection though.

Lump
12-18-2011, 12:42 AM
Mark,
I can't help you with Wilton parts, but if you need sheet metal for that Super Bee, I have connections.
Cheers.

pat82
12-18-2011, 11:01 AM
If its the "Wilton Tool Co. No 4, you may not find a base. They quit making that vise in the early 40's. That was the 1st generation of Wiltons and I would keep it away from heavy duty holding. Decent for a collection though.

I'm guessing this means that the base on the newer models will not fit the Wilton Tool Co. No 4?

autopts
12-18-2011, 08:14 PM
I'm guessing this means that the base on the newer models will not fit the Wilton Tool Co. No 4?

I don't think there is a whole lot of parts that are interchangable with the Wiltons from the early 40's. Wilton swivel bases in general are very hard to find used anyway. Its not to say that No. 4 is worthless. Clean, paint, lube and mount it. It will look cool. It will be like a Wilton lowrider sitting low as it does. It certainly won't take up alot of space and you may find out your using it more then you thought you would.

gregok
12-28-2011, 10:56 PM
I have been reading some of the posts on the dates stamped on the key ways of wilton vises. I just bought one that is stamped 7-945. The vise is a 4 1/2 size and came from the shop my dad worked at for almost forty years. Anyone have a Wilton bullet marked like this?

autopts
12-29-2011, 12:41 PM
I have been reading some of the posts on the dates stamped on the key ways of wilton vises. I just bought one that is stamped 7-945. The vise is a 4 1/2 size and came from the shop my dad worked at for almost forty years. Anyone have a Wilton bullet marked like this?

Hi, where is the stamping? on the key underneath or on the side under the jaw? it is stamped "Chicago" on the casting?

gregok
12-29-2011, 09:28 PM
It is stamped Chicago on the sides and 7-945 is stamped on the bottom of the key.

autopts
12-29-2011, 10:35 PM
It is stamped Chicago on the sides and 7-945 is stamped on the bottom of the key.

They didn't always put the (-) dash in the right place. Best guess is July 9th, 1945. New replacement jaws are cheap. Get the Wilton 2904110 jaws. They are 5" and you can trim them down to 4 1/2". They should fit perfect.

jeffmoss26
01-03-2012, 11:49 AM
I just found this post. Apparently Columbian/Warren/Wilton had a plant here in Cleveland. I never knew that!

kc-steve
01-03-2012, 04:08 PM
Jeff, being in Cleveland you could probably tell us if the old factory is still in existence. (I can't seem to locate the address at the moment.) If so, that would be the original Columbian Vise Company factory. The same as you see cast in the older Columbian vises.

Steve

jeffmoss26
01-03-2012, 04:14 PM
I looked up the address but it's not a great area of town.
Google street view does show a sign that says 'Wilton Tool Group, Ohio Operations, Columbian Vise Plant'

kc-steve
01-03-2012, 04:19 PM
Ah okay, I found the address. 9021 Bessemer Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County

Steve

kc-steve
01-03-2012, 04:36 PM
Ah okay, I found the address. 9021 Bessemer Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County


For those interested here's a screenshot of Google's street view. Yup, it's still there! :)

Steve

autopts
01-03-2012, 09:52 PM
For those interested here's a screenshot of Google's street view. Yup, it's still there! :)

Steve

Steve, I think you missed your call in life. You would have made a great crime detective! If anybody can find things given a clue, you can. Happy New Year!

jeffmoss26
01-04-2012, 08:06 AM
It could be an old picture though

OUTRIGGER
01-15-2012, 01:07 PM
I would like to ask RobRace10 a couple of questions :-

1. What is the possibility of finding any Wilton vice in the UK ? I don't recall seeing any US manufactured vice , possibly a Ridgid - but that could be a UK firm.

The model I would like would be a Machinists Bullet but obviously any would have to be considered.

2. Did Wilton export to any counties in the world ?

Having been reading up about all these US manufactured Classic / Cult vices - I feel there needs to be a few / odd person this side of the pond keeping a look out for artifacts for their private museum.

demographic
01-15-2012, 06:15 PM
I would like to ask RobRace10 a couple of questions :-

1. What is the possibility of finding any Wilton vice in the UK ? I don't recall seeing any US manufactured vice , possibly a Ridgid - but that could be a UK firm.

The model I would like would be a Machinists Bullet but obviously any would have to be considered.

2. Did Wilton export to any counties in the world ?

Having been reading up about all these US manufactured Classic / Cult vices - I feel there needs to be a few / odd person this side of the pond keeping a look out for artifacts for their private museum.

1, I know for a fact that there's someone with a fairly big Wilton (5" wide jaws) bullet vice in the UK cos I bid against him on Ebay and also cos he goes on a motorcycle forum I frequent.

2, I don't know how many countries the Wiltons were exported to and I don't know of anyone this side of the pond that is busy even now getting hold of odd and interesting vice's, nope, no siree. Nobody.
Ahem...












Where's that whistling innocently smilie then?

OUTRIGGER
01-16-2012, 03:56 PM
Interesting ,,, then I will bide my time & play cool & keep searching on eBay for old / vintage vices. Somehow I think far fewer US vices came to UK than went to the USA. I am now up to page 124 of the BIG vice thread , seems to be a lot of Record mechanics vices made it to USA , BUT I don't think I have seen a Engineers or Fitters QR mentioned. One of my firm fav. the Paramo HI-Duty - they seem to have been exported over , IMHO a far better vice than the Record Mechanics although I do have a small No. 1 Record and it is solid base cast.

Strange - we both know there are probably such people around in UK , I had already worked out that if somebody put a US "Classic" vice , there may be sfa interest.

Slept in on a nice older & rare Paramo a few weeks back , minta too , was going to snipe & did not have a showing interest bid & failed to see it in my watch list :mad:

============

ps - your :-

Where's that whistling innocently smilie then?

So I take it you will be my eBay counter-bidder LoL

demographic
01-16-2012, 04:49 PM
Interesting ,,, then I will bide my time & play cool & keep searching on eBay for old / vintage vices. Somehow I think far fewer US vices came to UK than went to the USA. I am now up to page 124 of the BIG vice thread , seems to be a lot of Record mechanics vices made it to USA , BUT I don't think I have seen a Engineers or Fitters QR mentioned. One of my firm fav. the Paramo HI-Duty - they seem to have been exported over , IMHO a far better vice than the Record Mechanics although I do have a small No. 1 Record and it is solid base cast.

Strange - we both know there are probably such people around in UK , I had already worked out that if somebody put a US "Classic" vice , there may be sfa interest.

Slept in on a nice older & rare Paramo a few weeks back , minta too , was going to snipe & did not have a showing interest bid & failed to see it in my watch list :mad:

============

ps - your :-

Where's that whistling innocently smilie then?

So I take it you will be my eBay counter-bidder LoL

Not many US vises (if they are made in the US I call em a vise and made in the UK I call them a vice) for sale in the UK.
Over the last year or so I've seen a couple of Wiltons and a good looking Chas Parker and the rest of the good ones have been English.
As yet I don't ever remember seeing a Scottish vice yet:headscrat There must be some but I just can't remember them.
I don't know just why the US doesn't seem to have quick release vices, plus they seem to stick with the weaker Acme thread over the buttress thread, just one of those things I suppose.
Another thing is that US vise's seem to be far heavier than UK ones, most of our quick release vice's are cast steel which might have something to do with it though.
As for bidding against each other? Well maybe but I'm not bidding on many, just every once in a while. Plus I don't really mind being outbid by someone who values what they win as opposed to someone who doesn't have a clue what they get and abuses it.

Good luck:)

Monte
01-16-2012, 05:08 PM
2. Did Wilton export to any counties in the world ?


to the UK for example :) if you can live with a new vice:
http://www.carver.co.uk/wilton4pp.pdf

OUTRIGGER
01-16-2012, 05:10 PM
QUOTE.

Not many US vises (if they are made in the US I call em a vise and made in the UK I call them a vice) for sale in the UK.
Over the last year or so I've seen a couple of Wiltons and a good looking Chas Parker and the rest of the good ones have been English.
As yet I don't ever remember seeing a Scottish vice yet There must be some but I just can't remember them.

Yes, I should get in the habbit of Vise for US manufacture , I knew about Tire but until very recently become aware of Vise , thought Vise Grip was just a trade mark play on spelling.

I am of reiver stock - still go north of the border for plunder , younger son just this weekend announced his engagement to the Edinburgh lass he has lived in tally with since they left university (fell on his feet, she has just finished GP training).

Get to the odd Scottish auction etc. my stamping ground for eBay plunder anywhere north (cheaper than going south).

Retired 6 years ago , used to get into loads of garages, distilleries and factories. Not looking at old vices then :(

OUTRIGGER
01-17-2012, 08:17 AM
to the UK for example :) if you can live with a new vice:
http://www.carver.co.uk/wilton4pp.pdf

============

Thanks for the link Monte , I don't have a Carver but know they are very good as I have used them at places I worked in the past.

So - it does seem there was some importation of US manuf. vises , just a matter of watching eBay for something interesting and in not showing any bad damage

:thumbup:

Steve Vincent
01-17-2012, 08:22 PM
I have listed another Wilton 800N on Ebay for those who may be interested.

Steve Vincent

djkeev
02-08-2012, 07:41 PM
I recently acquired an old Wilton Vise. It was out of my Mothers house, she at the young age of 94 packed up and moved to Oregon and got rid of what was in her home. Her 2nd husband owned a Flying "A" Station for many decades in Eatontown NJ. He retired back in the 70's and this Vise most likely moved to his home garage from the repair shop he had there.
It is a Wilton VC1 with the pipe jaws in it. A hefty 68 pounds of weight. It has been pounded up and welded upon and had a life of active use. I've not seen many photos of these vices on any Wilton Pages or pages of Vises for that matter!
I plan to simply clean it up, lubricate it and continue to use it as God meant it to be used. It's got 69 years of Patina on it and I'm going let it stay! It is missing a pin for the pipe jaw so I'll need to source a hardened rod to insert in there.

The stamp on the bottom is 9-48 which as I understand it makes this a 1943 vise.

It will replace the 1968 Era Craftsman that I've been using since my Dad passed away almost 30 years ago. It's sad to put it aside but really? How can you NOT use a vise like this?!?!

Enjoy the photos,
Hopefully the photos will embed, if not I'll try it another way!

Dave

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k554/djkeev/vise.jpg

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k554/djkeev/vise21951ad.jpg

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k554/djkeev/Vise3.jpg

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k554/djkeev/Vise5.jpg

And.... Does anyone know what this symbol is on the movable Jaw??
http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k554/djkeev/Vise4.jpg

autopts
02-08-2012, 10:20 PM
I recently acquired an old Wilton Vise. It was out of my Mothers house, she at the young age of 94 packed up and moved to Oregon and got rid of what was in her home. Her 2nd husband owned a Flying "A" Station for many decades in Eatontown NJ. He retired back in the 70's and this Vise most likely moved to his home garage from the repair shop he had there.
It is a Wilton VC1 with the pipe jaws in it. A hefty 68 pounds of weight. It has been pounded up and welded upon and had a life of active use. I've not seen many photos of these vices on any Wilton Pages or pages of Vises for that matter!
I plan to simply clean it up, lubricate it and continue to use it as God meant it to be used. It's got 69 years of Patina on it and I'm going let it stay! It is missing a pin for the pipe jaw so I'll need to source a hardened rod to insert in there.

The stamp on the bottom is 9-48 which as I understand it makes this a 1943 vise.

It will replace the 1968 Era Craftsman that I've been using since my Dad passed away almost 30 years ago. It's sad to put it aside but really? How can you NOT use a vise like this?!?!

Enjoy the photos,
Hopefully the photos will embed, if not I'll try it another way!

Dave

And.... Does anyone know what this symbol is on the movable Jaw??
http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k554/djkeev/Vise4.jpg

Dave, thats a beautiful relic! I believe that Wilton was made in 48. A small length of 3/8" rod could serve as a pin. Don't abuse it. Its served its time.

bigcaddy
02-09-2012, 01:18 AM
Really?! My Wilton is stamped 4-46. So that means it was made in 1941 - their first year? Does anyone have an earlier stamp?

My earliest stamp is a 2" baby bullet vise with a date of 7-41. I've only seen more current dates then that. It could be the first year of production and they started doing the warranty exp. with date later on.

Danny304
02-15-2012, 03:45 PM
About 15 years ago my dad gave me a vise. It has been sitting on a bottom shelf in the shed for along time. Decided I needed to clean it up. Took some pictures if you guys are interested. It was nailed to a couple of 1" boards, almost rusted shut, believe it is a Wilton Shop King.

MXER
04-27-2012, 08:30 AM
Hello, I am new to this fourm. Whet a great thread on wilton vises. I am currently restoring a pat. pending No. 4 Wilton and was wondering if anyone knows some of the orginal colors. I scraped down to what looks like a hunter green. Any info would greatly apprecatied. I have 3 other wiltons and still looking for more.

kc-steve
04-27-2012, 08:48 AM
QUOTE.

Not many US vises (if they are made in the US I call em a vise and made in the UK I call them a vice) for sale in the UK. . . .


Good point so I added "vice" to the thread search tags. Another example of that is in the USA "defense" is "defence" in the UK. We are the same countries divided by a common language. :)

Steve

kc-steve
04-27-2012, 08:56 AM
Hello, I am new to this fourm. Whet a great thread on wilton vises. I am currently restoring a pat. pending No. 4 Wilton and was wondering if anyone knows some of the orginal colors. I scraped down to what looks like a hunter green. Any info would greatly apprecatied. I have 3 other wiltons and still looking for more.

Autpts knows more than I about that but I think the older Wiltons were machine gray. I'm not sure what you mean by "hunter green" though. I have purchased the Rustoleum hammered "Verde Green" as a close color match to newer versions of Wilton vises. (see photos below)

Welcome to the forum! :)

Steve

zekers59
04-27-2012, 06:27 PM
Here is 9300n and 9400 side by side;

9300
11-63
No Guarantee Date
Original Paint


9400
Guarantee Exp Date 12-31-62
Some rust but still smooth.....a little WD 40 on it. Appears to be Black paint.......is this another color Wilton Used for a short time? Or has this been painted?

Wilton moved to their new plant in Schiller Park in 1955.......so these markings verify.


Very pleased with both vises.......the 9400 has quite a bit more beef. Special kudos to Autopts and mjozefow for their input!
I think I'll wire wheel strip and give them a fresh coat of paint!

bgott
04-28-2012, 12:21 AM
Originally Posted by MXER
Hello, I am new to this fourm. Whet a great thread on wilton vises. I am currently restoring a pat. pending No. 4 Wilton and was wondering if anyone knows some of the orginal colors. I scraped down to what looks like a hunter green. Any info would greatly apprecatied. I have 3 other wiltons and still looking for more.

Autpts knows more than I about that but I think the older Wiltons were machine gray. I'm not sure what you mean by "hunter green" though. I have purchased the Rustoleum hammered "Verde Green" as a close color match to newer versions of Wilton vises. (see photos below)

This is the original green. It looks like a hospital or avacado green. The slide is stamped 5-50, just to give you a time frame.

autopts
04-28-2012, 01:12 AM
This is the original green. It looks like a hospital or avacado green. The slide is stamped 5-50, just to give you a time frame.

Just a suggestion, don't paint that vise! What paint thats left, plus the sticker over the top is really what makes that vise valueable just the way it is.

gatewaysysop
04-28-2012, 02:21 AM
Just a suggestion, don't paint that vise! What paint thats left, plus the sticker over the top is really what makes that vise valueable just the way it is.


Seconded! Original paint FTW. :bowdown:

bgott
04-28-2012, 09:33 AM
Don't worry, I'm not painting it!:) That would be like the guy who was so proud of his gold medal that he had it bronzed!:p

kc-steve
04-28-2012, 10:50 AM
That vise is XLNT! Thanks for sharing that. If it wasn't for the few originals still around we would never know what they are supposed to look like.

Thanks,
Steve

Cyclotronguy
06-13-2012, 12:39 PM
Another Wilton mystery;

I have a Wilton 150 OS, which is clearly a rebadged Dawn 150mm Offset vise from Australia....

In Email from Dawn a couple of years ago, the association was clearly less than happy.

I wanted to buy a second one from Dawn..... they had exactly zero interest in exporting to the US and had no trouble saying so.

Anyone know of that unhappy marriage, and if the vise was cast in the US under license or cast down under. Given the cost of transportation on a 90 pound vise, it would have made sense to manufacturer in the US....

Cyclotronguy

rbannon
06-13-2012, 08:22 PM
I found the offset vises listed in the 2004 WMH Tool catalog. They do not list COO. There is a reference to 60,000 psi ductile iron.

demographic
06-14-2012, 01:28 PM
Another Wilton mystery;

I have a Wilton 150 OS, which is clearly a rebadged Dawn 150mm Offset vise from Australia....

In Email from Dawn a couple of years ago, the association was clearly less than happy.

I wanted to buy a second one from Dawn..... they had exactly zero interest in exporting to the US and had no trouble saying so.

Anyone know of that unhappy marriage, and if the vise was cast in the US under license or cast down under. Given the cost of transportation on a 90 pound vise, it would have made sense to manufacturer in the US....

Cyclotronguy

Aren't Dawns just Records built under license in Australia? Not the offset ones but the more usual ones look pretty much just the same as Records to me.

Could you buy a Record and paint it red:thumbup:

alan camby
06-14-2012, 09:14 PM
What model is this?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wilton-4-1-2-Bullet-Machanics-Machinest-Bench-Shop-Vise-In-Great-Shape-/170858797565?pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item27c7fa59fd
looks like a light duty machinist vise. Does not look like it ever had Pipe jaws.
Even though it does not say made in USA, can we assume it was since it has Schiller Park Illinois USA.
What is the set screw with jam nut for that is located on the bottom of the dynamic Jaw.

kc-steve
06-14-2012, 10:34 PM
Alan, I have never seen that style before. And the seller doesn't seem to know much about vises since he calls it a "Mechanic's Machinist" vise. The Mechanic's vise has the pipe jaws and the Machinist's do not.

The Schiller Park casting is implying and is the same as saying it is made in the USA.

Steve

alan camby
06-14-2012, 10:51 PM
Steve, Have you ever seen that set screw with jam nut setup. the vise has the 3 screw collar to retain the spindle, so curious what this is for.

kc-steve
06-14-2012, 10:55 PM
Nope, just about everything about that vise is alien to me. :)

Steve

autopts
06-14-2012, 10:59 PM
That vise I believe was an anniversery additon made I think for one year. That vise did not come with pipe jaws. Wilton never made an offset vise like Dawn. Dawn has a distributor in Washington St somewhere. They made a terriffic vise. The two companies are and always were complete seperate.

http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae325/autopts71045/RareWilton4.jpg

autopts
06-14-2012, 11:04 PM
What model is this?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wilton-4-1-2-Bullet-Machanics-Machinest-Bench-Shop-Vise-In-Great-Shape-/170858797565?pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item27c7fa59fd
looks like a light duty machinist vise. Does not look like it ever had Pipe jaws.
Even though it does not say made in USA, can we assume it was since it has Schiller Park Illinois USA.
What is the set screw with jam nut for that is located on the bottom of the dynamic Jaw.

Schiller Park casting is implying and is the same as saying it is made in the USA.

Steve

Steve, Have you ever seen that set screw with jam nut setup. the vise has the 3 screw collar to retain the spindle, so curious what this is for.

Wilton did a few variations with that front spindle assy. Some, I wish they would have kept.
http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae325/autopts71045/RareWilton6.jpg

kc-steve
06-14-2012, 11:07 PM
Hey Nick! Was it an anniversary for 1961, 1971, 1981, 1991 . . . .?
Maybe 1991 is the most logical being 50 years. Yours looks a hell of a lot better than the eBay vise. :)

Steve

Stuart in MN
06-15-2012, 09:36 AM
I posted a photo of this in the old vise thread a while back, but it probably should be included in this discussion of Wilton as well. I bought this at a flea market a couple years ago.

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=81282

alan camby
06-15-2012, 11:55 PM
I know that the key on the bottom of the slide bar should have a date of manufacture. What If a Wilton has a number under the Illinois that is cast on the side. I bought a vise that has 60 78 cast under the Illinois. Wondering if this means the 60th day of 1978.

The vise is model 500
Any Idea?

thanks, Alan

autopts
06-16-2012, 01:05 AM
Hey Nick! Was it an anniversary for 1961, 1971, 1981, 1991 . . . .?
Maybe 1991 is the most logical being 50 years. Yours looks a hell of a lot better than the eBay vise. :)

Steve

Steve, its got the XXX on the side. I believe it was 1971. Some years ago I saw a add on CL of a shop by me selling off tools on a Saturday. I went and there were 10 of these. I bought them all and naturally sold them all off. I still have new jaws for them.

gtrotter
07-01-2012, 11:32 PM
Just picked this up off craigslist today, first Wilton purchase. It's a Wilton 9400 WE. No cracks, swivel base works, dual locking deals for the base. Has a date stamp of 6/51, so that would put it actually being in 1946? Just gotta new jaws and repaint.

http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee178/gjtrotter/Snapbucket/FEE84580-orig.jpg

Catalyze
07-02-2012, 01:53 PM
Very nice old Wilton....grats!
Craig

gtrotter
07-02-2012, 06:45 PM
Very nice old Wilton....grats!
Craig

Thanks! Now, just have to find some replacement jaw inserts.

Oh, and sorry for the mess. I just cleaned out the old truck to trade in.

ID-Butch
11-04-2012, 11:36 PM
Hi all, just found and joined this group. I've had a Wilton vice for 20 years or so and can't find much info on it. I believe it is a 500S. It has no model number but does have 101164 and a large D with an A inside it. I believe it is an old military vice. Any help with ID'ing it. I recently picked up a 1780 that needs some parts. What is the difference between a 1780 and a 1780A? Thanks

autopts
11-05-2012, 03:10 PM
Welcome!
The 101164 is a 5" Machinist vise, with swivel base its a 500S without, a 500N. made back from about 1975-2012 that big guy specs out to exactly to the model made today. I think the "A" on the 1780 is used just by suppliers. Tradesman vises always come with a swivel base. That big Tradesman is nice!!

Man of Many Vices
11-05-2012, 04:45 PM
Hi all, just found and joined this group. I've had a Wilton vice for 20 years or so and can't find much info on it. I believe it is a 500S.... I believe it is an old military vice....

Your Wilton 500S is a fabulous vise that many of us would be proud to have in our shops and garages. It is unlikely you will ever need a larger or "nicer" vise.

With the vise issue behind you, you can now focus all of your time on assembling a nice collection of hand tools.

Catalyze
11-05-2012, 09:55 PM
Butch - welcome and grats on a nice Wilton! Photos are like bacon to vise folks....we love it. Post photos when you have a question and the answers are more plentiful and accurate. Except for my answers....they aren't accurate but they are free!
Craig

IronDeficient
11-26-2012, 11:19 PM
Really?! My Wilton is stamped 4-46. So that means it was made in 1941 - their first year? Does anyone have an earlier stamp?

Seems I do. I recently acquired this Wilton No. 4 (840) with the "PAT PEN" castings. The date stamp appears as "2-45", stamped twice.

Of course, the other possibility is that it was supposed to be 12-45. The 2 is only partial, in both stamps, with no sign at all of a preceding one.

If this is a 5yr guarantee date, even at 12-45 it would put the founding date of 1941 in question.

_CY_
12-15-2012, 10:17 AM
just found this killer thread... loads of data

hitechneanderthol
12-30-2012, 02:28 PM
Newbie here, I have a '85 #1760 bullet vise without a swivel base. Does anyone know if they were offered and/or sold without bases or did my vise potentially lose its base somewhere along the line? I keep asking my vise but it isn't talking. Does anyone have a replacement swivel base that they would like to part with (and the bolts w/locking wedges - whatever they are called???)?
Thanks to all for a great board/thread.

Catalyze
12-30-2012, 11:39 PM
Look for a poster named Autopts.......he is probably a few posts above yours. Send him a forum mail (you may have to have a larger number of posts) and chat him about the base. I think that yours can be converted to a swivel base with factory parts. Autopts will know the answer. Oh.......welcome to the Forum!
Craig

kc-steve
12-31-2012, 02:56 AM
Seems I do. I recently acquired this Wilton No. 4 (840) with the "PAT PEN" castings. The date stamp appears as "2-45", stamped twice.

Of course, the other possibility is that it was supposed to be 12-45. The 2 is only partial, in both stamps, with no sign at all of a preceding one.

If this is a 5yr guarantee date, even at 12-45 it would put the founding date of 1941 in question.

The founding date isn't in question at all because the original patent was first applied for Sept 1941. But what is in question throughout this thread is when the 5-year guarantee started, ended, or even existed at all. It might even be a combination of existing for a period then ending, but when?

In other words, some date stamps are 5-year guarantee dates, while others might be actual production dates. But when did the change occur?

Steve

hitechneanderthol
01-01-2013, 09:21 PM
Thanks Craig, I contacted autopts and am getting a hold of some replacement parts. Life is good.

Man of Many Vices
01-01-2013, 09:53 PM
....WMH wants nothing to do with Wilton's past. In 2010 Wilton customer service even changed the name when answering phones from "Good Morning, Wilton Tool Customer Service" to "Hi, this is Walter Meyers Holding Inc, may I help you"? WMH is Swiss based and huge! They want nothing more then to globalize every line they have. They tried it with some of their Tradesman vises being made in China. The 1740, 1750,& 1760. American users started screaming about how poorly made vises they were so eventually they brought that vise back home to make.

I would add my voice to the chorus that sings out for public condemnation of Walter Meyers Holding Inc. for destroying a noble American brand. If anything is to be gained, it will be to see how long it takes for the general consumer to catch on, then categorically reject low quality Wilton products. (I know, some of their high dollar machinist vices are still top quality).

kapster
01-01-2013, 11:45 PM
I've been searching for a deal on a wilton for a few years now, just isn't much around me. I'm on the edge of buying a new wilton, how disappointing is the quality on the new ones?

Was wondering how you tell if its a made in USA, I've seen talk on here that they were made overseas for a time? Is this vise USA?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nice-Used-Wilton-1750-Tradesman-Bench-Vise-5-inch-Pipe-Jaws-New-Jaw-Inserts-/181053178756?pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item2a279c4384

Terri Dare
01-09-2013, 07:52 PM
I'm new to this site and I am really enjoying it so far. What I would like to know is how to I completely disassemble my vise so I can lube it and clean it. I also would like to match the original paint. A copy of the owners manual or anything like that would really help.

Terri Dare
01-09-2013, 08:32 PM
o.k., here is some information on the vise i have. This is a bullet type vise
inside base-101088
outside base-101089
under long tube- 172
under long screw-900004
long tube left side-8140
body left side- Wilton
Schiller PK USA
ILL

body right side- Wilton
Schiller PK USA
Ill
Any information you could give me would be helpful.
I would like to rebuild it.

Catalyze
01-09-2013, 09:04 PM
Terri....welcome to the forum!
This link should help you get your Wilton apart. If you run into problems, post up in the Vises of Garage Journal thread.
Craig
http://tinyurl.com/add4mqr

Seiler
02-11-2013, 11:34 PM
Greetings everyone!

I am relatively new to this particular forum, not new to forums in general in the least.

I acquired an old vise from my Welding Instructor that is need of some serious TLC. Can't complain one bit though when it was free! I'm having a hard time identifying which model it is in particular, which is keeping me from hunting down some replacement parts. I'm hoping someone on here might have an idea or is able to point me in the right direction. Onto some information and pictures--

The vise is a monster. The Jaw width measures 5". I'm not sure on how far it will open. The upside down U shaped washer is missing and I cannot separate the two jaws without a new one, hence my dilemma. There is no visible "Model #" that I can tell, but there are what appears to be Part #'s(?) on each piece.

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3409_zps5e6f1a80.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3413_zps90575f94.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3411_zpsaa53b063.jpg

You can see the main missing part here:

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3414_zpsd16d37c0.jpg

I was able to disassemble the vise slightly, removing the inner spindle parts as well as the back dust cap. Here are some closer detail pictures on the only visible numbering.

I believe this reads "101042"
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3416_zps5c83ed73.jpg

This side reads "101043"
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3417_zps1f66b0ef.jpg

The spindle assembly reads "101041"
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3419_zps4449f158.jpg

The underside of the bottom swivel reads "101081"
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3420_zpsa4d966a1.jpg

My goal on this vise is to do a complete restore so it functions just as well as it did on day #1 and to keep it in the family for a few years. Based upon what research I was able to accomplish, my guess as of right now is that it might be a 70's-80's 500s model? Again, I'm not 100% sure. I don't want to order any replacement parts until I have an idea of what model it actually is. And since I can't get the two jaws to separate, I have no way of checking the date stamp on the key. Any help anyone could offer would be greatly appreciated! I do intend on documenting the complete restore once I'm able to begin.

On a side note, this vise lived outside in the elements on a grinding booth. You can't tell in the pictures above, but there was a SERIOUS layer of metal shavings that had built up over the years and stuck to one side of the vise. I was able to chip a lot of it away, but the largest section came off in one piece.

This is rough look of how it sat on the one side:
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3423_zps3828c685.jpg

Once I was able to remove it:
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3422_zps5aba3c99.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c78/xj2/Archive/DSC_3421_zps339167bb.jpg

The piece that came off probably weights a good 2-3 lbs. :scared: If anything I think it helped shield the vise from the weather and what not. Pretty neat I think.

Thanks,

Scott

autopts
02-12-2013, 08:24 AM
That Wilton is going to make a nice restore. I didn't read if you said the Dynamic was seized into the body. It looks as if you had a hard time unscrewing that handle and sheared of the collar screws. That's not the end of the world. That vise was made anywhere from 1962-1974. The model originally was 9500 but the Wilton decided to change it to 101043. You can still get the collar with screws, Jaws (GJ Member KMScott), handles, you can use new rods and cut to length, I think its in nice condition. I did notice that center ring is cracked right where the dowel pin goes to center it. That ring is about $60 or more. If you can repair it, go for it. Let us know if that vise is seized up and we are full of suggestions. Welcome aboard.

Seiler
02-12-2013, 10:35 AM
That Wilton is going to make a nice restore. I didn't read if you said the Dynamic was seized into the body. It looks as if you had a hard time unscrewing that handle and sheared of the collar screws. That's not the end of the world. That vise was made anywhere from 1962-1974. The model originally was 9500 but the Wilton decided to change it to 101043. You can still get the collar with screws, Jaws (GJ Member KMScott), handles, you can use new rods and cut to length, I think its in nice condition. I did notice that center ring is cracked right where the dowel pin goes to center it. That ring is about $60 or more. If you can repair it, go for it. Let us know if that vise is seized up and we are full of suggestions. Welcome aboard.

Hello there,

The dynamic jaw is seized in the body of the vise. When I brought it home, the U-shaped thrust washer was missing so I was able to unscrew the main handle completely. I'm not sure how badly it's seized or how much force it will take to remove it. My first thought was to soak the area in penetrating oil. Do you have any recommendations on where (aside from KMScott) I can purchase the other replacement parts? I'm guessing I'll start searching for 9500 parts. Wilton Vise 101043 doesn't yield much information via the google.

I too noticed the crack on the underside. It's on my list of parts to purchase when I can find some.

Thank you very much for your help!

Scott

autopts
02-12-2013, 02:49 PM
Hello there,

The dynamic jaw is seized in the body of the vise. When I brought it home, the U-shaped thrust washer was missing so I was able to unscrew the main handle completely. I'm not sure how badly it's seized or how much force it will take to remove it. My first thought was to soak the area in penetrating oil. Do you have any recommendations on where (aside from KMScott) I can purchase the other replacement parts? I'm guessing I'll start searching for 9500 parts. Wilton Vise 101043 doesn't yield much information via the google.

I too noticed the crack on the underside. It's on my list of parts to purchase when I can find some.

Thank you very much for your help!

Scott

My guess that vise was made in around 1968. Wilton will be of no use. As far as parts, you have all the important parts. The base ring with dowel pin is still available but if you can find someone to braze that crack you will save yourself some money. The biggest problem you have is to try to get it unseized. Another good size vise would come in handy. Before I started dunking it into electrolysis, take that vise and clamp the dynamic jaws into the other vise so that the body is hanging down loose. Get some PB Blaster. Deep Creep, WD40, any penetrating oil and apply around where the channel bar goes into the body. Make sure you have a cushion below just in case it lets loose. Knock the body with a mallet and see it its taking down your penetrating oil. It could even be ATF, you will see your making progress when the oil starts dripping out the other end. The front collar, dowel pin etc. is not a problem at this time. Some members have had Wiltons seized years of getting them. Even electrolysis didn't make them come loose. If you think your making progress apply some heat, that may speed thing up. If it should come loose, then maybe electrolysis would finish the job.

kapster
02-12-2013, 10:34 PM
Im working on going through my wilton 500 cleaning it up. In the process of getting the pins for the nut out i bent them. Would it be stupid to tap the vise to put bolts in like ive seen seem some with? I can make new pins, just wondered if that would be a better route.

autopts
02-12-2013, 11:06 PM
Sure, that would work. Try a 1/4" 20 coarse and make sure your screws are only as long as the pins. The might take away from the cosmetics of your bullet but if its your user vise, who would care.

BIG Eric
02-18-2013, 02:03 PM
I was given a Wilton 400S a few years ago but it looks different from some of the others. It is a 72 model year and here are some pictures. SO what do you all think?

wood butcher
06-18-2013, 09:20 PM
Just reading thread thought i would check 2-46 is on mine

kc-steve
06-18-2013, 10:00 PM
Looks like a nice oldie. The year looks about right for the production year just from the low profile.

Steve

autopts
06-19-2013, 12:04 AM
Just reading thread thought i would check 2-46 is on mine

If that's a 4" or 4 1/2", there is a complete base assy on Ebay. They made that base until about 1953-54

http://www.ebay.com/itm/251290643620?_trksid=p5197.c0.m619#ht_63wt_918

autopts
06-19-2013, 12:09 AM
I was given a Wilton 400S a few years ago but it looks different from some of the others. It is a 72 model year and here are some pictures. SO what do you all think?

Very nice! Wilton was experimenting with the base that they put on their very early import 1740-50 in 1972 but they tried it on a few of their USA 9400/101028's. Fairy rare.

mattv97
06-19-2013, 12:59 AM
We have numerous 70's vintage wilton bullet style vises in the shop i work in and they are the best vise in my book. I was also looking at them dawn vises and it's nice to see a company proud of there history and that they are still owned and producing vises in there country. Prefer American made but definetely like them.

wood butcher
06-19-2013, 07:14 PM
Thanks autopts ill let someone else get it i mainly use wood vises just like to have it when i need it

John Odom
12-02-2013, 08:55 PM
My first post. I have read this thread.

I just got a Wilton 1750 vise for $10. It is badly rusted. The slide is seized up. The screw will wiggle a little. There are no jaws. The jaw screws are broken off. There is no cover on the end of the slide.

This will be an interesting project! My plan is to remove the collar around the handle/screw and back out the screw. All the while soaking the slide with Kroil. Then I will try to move the slide.

Do you fellows have any suggestions?

rallyhard
02-23-2014, 11:36 PM
Thanks for this thread!

Without ever paying much attention to it, I assumed that the vise that I inherited from my dad was a Harbor Freight, but it turns out it's a Wilton.

This thread got me curious about when and where we got the vise, so I started digging and found this picture of when we bought it at HD in 3/2007. It has served well for the past 7 years.

http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h56/rallyhard/garagejournal/wilton-1.jpg
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h56/rallyhard/garagejournal/wilton.png

drivesitfar
02-23-2014, 11:49 PM
Rally: first off it looks like you might be a new member so welcome to GJ and glad to have you posting and reading our threads and posts.

even though you inherited a Wilton vise it wasn't made in the US. it is a light duty vise and might outlast you so you can pass it on to your son or nephew if you use it without beating on it or putting a pipe on the handle to tighten things up.

as you read the Vise thread if you want to because there are hundreds of vises on it and then all the Wilton posts you might find that there are some differences in vises. that said since your Dad bought it I would probably keep it on one end of the bench and get another big old US vise for the other end of the bench or make a nice stand for one.

take care and I know many that have your vise and are happy with it.

rallyhard
02-24-2014, 03:14 AM
Rally: first off it looks like you might be a new member so welcome to GJ and glad to have you posting and reading our threads and posts.

even though you inherited a Wilton vise it wasn't made in the US. it is a light duty vise and might outlast you so you can pass it on to your son or nephew if you use it without beating on it or putting a pipe on the handle to tighten things up.

as you read the Vise thread if you want to because there are hundreds of vises on it and then all the Wilton posts you might find that there are some differences in vises. that said since your Dad bought it I would probably keep it on one end of the bench and get another big old US vise for the other end of the bench or make a nice stand for one.

take care and I know many that have your vise and are happy with it.

Oops, sorry for cluttering up your thread! Newbie mistake; I had actually meant to post this in the "The VISES of Garage Journal" thread!:o After seeing that mine was a Wilton, I ran a search and came across this thread, and then ended up accidentally posting it here instead of there... Is there any way a moderator could move my post to the other thread?

Oh, and thanks for the response. I do like seeing the old iron and certainly have respect for Made in USA.:bowdown: I might have to get me a big old beefy Wilton some day for the occasional heavy job. It's funny you mentioned the pipe on the handle trick; I broke the jaw of a smaller bench vise of my dad's many years ago doing just that. I don't know what the brand on that one was.

drivesitfar
02-24-2014, 11:08 AM
Rally: you certainly didn't clutter up or place your post in the wrong spot and I was only giving you a little more information about your vise. with your sense of humor and use of your the icons you will be a great addition to Garage Journal. Welcome again and feel free to post your vise on the vise thread also because we can never have too many vise pictures as you will see if you start reading that 1000 plus page thread.

I remember my grand dad taking me to the repair shops when I was little to get something repaired and the greasy guys doing the work (I swear that they never took a bath in a year in those days) would throw the huge piece in one of their 200 pound vises, grab a huge piece of pipe or a sledge and crank that baby in tight.

of course in those days these $1000 vises were only $20, but that was still a lot of money and maybe you have seen a few of the repairs that might have taken a welder a day to fix a broken one.

in any case you didn't do anything wrong and if anything you revived an old thread that might need a few more posts.

good luck with your search for an old US vise and PM me if you have any questions about them if you need help.