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Old 12-17-2011, 08:50 PM   #1
puttsy
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Default Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Hey all, I've asked several questions about wrenches, ratchets, and many other tools here but was often lost by responses that used grease-money, mechanic, tool junkie, motor-head, etc… jargon. I'm going to try and make things a bit more understandable and at least explain some things that I only found out through a lot of effort and google searches.

Ratchets:
XX-teeth: The amount of teeth found on the gear of a ratchet. This is usually found by turning the bit holder(1/4", 3/8" or ½" commonly) one quarter of the way around the ratchet and counting the 'clicks' as you turn. Multiply the number of clicks you counted by 4 and you've got how many teeth your ratchet has.

~Common tooth counts are: 36 (course tooth), 40, 45, 60, 72, 80 (Snap-On Dual 80), and 100. There is no algorithum for tooth count. Not like computers that are base 8 and base 10 or hexideceimal (among other terms) There is no 'quick' calculation for determing standard tooth counts.~puttsy


Pawl:This is the second half of the gear that the gear-wheel clicks on. This part often moves/shifts when you reverse the ratcheting direction.
~The Snap-On 'Dual 80 ratchets (FL80 as a reference) have 2 pawls (2 pawls) effecitvely doubling the tooth count and leaving more teeth touching the gear at the same time. This is turn also increases the ratchets strength.~

Detents:These are dimples, divots, notches, etc…that a ball-bearing (usually anyway) clicks into. These are usually found on flex head ratchets and breaker bars. The bb is held up to fall into the detents by a small spring.

Quick-Release (QR): This is the mechanism, or way that a socket is placed on, and removed from a ratchet. A metal shaft goes through the center of the primary gear on the ratchet and to the bit holder. A ball bearing is usually fit into the bit holder and, when the QR 'button' is pressed, this bearing falls into a cut-out in the peg allowing a socket to fit onto the holder or fall off of the holder. Nearly every socket has detents in them to allow them to be held onto the bit-holder of a ratchet. This design was pioneered by Craftsman in the 1970's.

Teardrop or Pear-Head: The shape of the head of some ratchets. The shape is, as the name implies, the shape of a teardrop (or pear). Coarse tooth tear-drops are commonly the least expensive ratchets a vendor sells. The Craftsman 44807, 44808, 44809, 44811 ratchets are examples of this shape. However, Tear-drop ratchets are often the most 'premium' style fine-tooth ratchets vendors offer as well. (Snap-On FL80 is an example of a premium fine-tooth, teardrop ratchet)

Round-Head (RH): This is another shape of ratchet head. It is, as the name implies, round. Round head ratchets are usually have finer teeth (more teeth overall) making them more versatile for confined spaces. Round head ratchets are often NOT of the quick-release variety. The 'teeth/primary gears' on RH ratchets are on the ratchet head. The pawl(s) are usually inside the teeth. Course-tooth round-heads are usually the cheapest type of ratchets found in cheap-tool bins.

Edits to Teardrop and Round-Head thanks to tyndall. .

Fine tooth: There is much debate as to what 'fine-tooth' equates too. A general idea is that there are more teeth per degree of movement of the ratchet than standard ratchets have. (i.e. A standard Craftsman 3/8" ratchet has 36 teeth, a fine tooth has 41 teeth with dual pawls. Making it an effective 82 teeth) Fine-tooth ratchets are often found in a round-head style due to a different mechanism layout than.

RHFT:Stands for Round-Head Fine-tooth. This means the head of the ratchet is round and the tooth count (density) is higher than a a normal ratchet. Therefore, there is a smaller 'arc' needed for the ratchet to engage.

**-Round head fine tooth, Can refer to a specfic type of ratchet typically a Craftsman round head with built in spinner/thumb wheel, but can also had as an Allen, KD, Easco, etc branded ratchet.

Last edited by puttsy; 01-15-2012 at 10:43 PM.
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:51 PM   #2
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Arc (or swing):This is how many degrees a ratchet needs to be turned in order for the next tooth (teeth) to engage (click). The higher the tooth count, the smaller the space needed to work in (That is only a rule-of thumb, not the rule). If the arc is 30 degrees, you need to move the ratchet 30 degrees for the next tooth to click. 6 degrees means the ratchet only needs to move 6 degrees. Often, the lower the tooth count, the more "play" the ratchet will have between clicks. (edits thanks to Joe B.)

RHNSFT: Stands for Round Head Not So Fine Tooth. Not all round head ratchets are fine tooth, but not all fine tooth ratchets are round head. This is for when a round head ratchet has standard teeth (maybe a few more) but, the arc is large enough that much more space is needed to 'click' than a normal fine tooth, (high tooth density) ratchet. This is NOT a standard term, more of an omage to lauver who is very wise when talking about tools.

Sealed-Head:This is found primarily on Snap-On ratchets. It means that the head (the part with the mechanics) is sealed (usually with an O-ring) to prevent debris from entering the ratcheting mechanisms and 'gumming up the works'. Basically, it keeps foreign material out of the head and away from damaging the pawl/gear wheel/teeth.

Flex-Head:Flex-Head wrenches and ratchets are tools that have heads(ratcheting mechanisms) not can be pivoted on the handle. A 'pin' usually holds the head in place but, the head can usually be moved 180 degrees. There are often locking mechanisms or detents on flex-heads that allow them to say in the angle you need. This is handy for hard to reach places.

Roto-head:This is a type of ratchet that has a Round-Head that pivots/rotates on the handle. The handle is usually a fork and the ratcheting mechanism Round-head rotates around an axle between the posts of the fork.

Short or Stubby (or even midget):These are ratchets and wrenches that are shorter than standard (or long handle) tools that are used in very small/confined spaces where a normal tool just won't fit. You lose A LOT of leverage while using a stubby ratchet/wrench but, they are sometimes essential when tight space constraints are present.
**-Very short legnth ratchet with full size head ( ie: 3/8 drive ratchet with full size 3/8 drive gear/internals)

Ratchet spinner or thumb wheel;
A wheel (usually) built in to the ratchet gear. Allows your thumb to turn the ratchet mechanisam. Also refered to as a speed wheel.** ~This is NOT a stand-alone ratchet/tool, it is simply a 'feature' of some ratchets that allows the mechinisms to move from a 'wheel' outside of the head. Sometimes also called a speed disc/wheel or Metal speed disc/wheel~puttsy

Compact ratchet;
Not to be confused with a stubby ratchet, It's a 1/4 drive ratchet body with a 3/8 drive square drive gear. Same internals as the 1/4 drive version but with a different cover plate (if teardrop style) and 3/8 drive square instead of 1/4. Helpful when dealing with limited access. Snap-ons FC80 is an example.**

Handle Designs!
This is where I REALLY got lost and confused when I started looking at tools.

Fully Polished:This is the handle design found on most 'professional' ratchets. On ratchets, it is round, with contours for your hand. It is, as the name suggests, polished so it is nice and shiny. Fully polished wrenches are wrenches that are slick/smooth and shiny from end to end. (The contoured handle design is actually called a calabash design. But this term is seldom used)

Satin:This is handles that are usually rough, not shiny, and are usually 'no-frills'. Satin ratchets and wrenches are often found in combination with raised panels.

Raised Panel : Raised Panel means that the handle has a 'plate' on it that often has the brand, the model number, and for wrenches, the size. The tools with 'Raised Paneled' handles usually have a satin finish with the 'plate, or Panel' being polished showing the information.

Long Handle: This means that the handle on the ratchet is longer than standard. This provides greater leverage with the ratchet and can be used to loosen bolts/nuts in hard to reach spots.

Tang:
This is what Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and John Glenn drink daily...
The tang is the part of a ratchet that holds the bit. It is actually the tapered part where you place the drive end of a socket and the tang encompasses the full bit driving mechinisims minus the gears. This is a MUCH more commonly used term in fine culinary establishments

Last edited by puttsy; 03-05-2012 at 01:37 AM.
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:51 PM   #3
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Wrenches!

There are many different style and shapes, many have a specfic purpose and are not always needed by the average person to preform most tasks, sometimes however, they are impossible to do with out. If you find your self sumped on how to access a starter bolt for instance, an "S" or half moon wrench is likely the answer. But for the most part the basic long pattern combination wrench will do most anything the average home mechanic/tinkerer needs. **

Combination Wrenches: These are arguably the most common and most essential wrenches. They have an open-end on one side and a matching sized box-end on the other.

Open-end wrench: (Sometimes wrongly called a spanner wrench) Open end wrenches are open wrenches that you can slide the wrench onto a nut/bolt that is sandwiched between something. s

Box-End wrench: A round, closed (usually circular) shaped wrench that is placed around an entire fastener to remove it. A box end puts pressure on all 'corners' of a fastener. The most common are 6-point and 12 point box end wrenches. 6 point are hexagonal shaped and have 6 contact points for hex bolts, 12 point have 12 contact points for bolts. If a 12-point is used on a hex bolt, only 6 points are actively being used to apply force to the bolt. 12-pint box ends are likely to round off hex bolts if much force is applied. There are also 12-point bolts that require 12-point wrenches. 12-point wrenches can usually be used on square bolts too. Also, 12-point wrenches require much less area to move (arc, as seen in ratchets) so they are more useful/convenient in constrained areas.

Ratcheting-wrench:These are wrenches that have a ratcheting mechanism in them. They are very convenient and are VERY useful in confined places. 12-point ratcheting wrenches are the most common type because they are easier to place on bolts from many more angles than a standard 6-point wrench.
[11/17/2011]

Added terms: ~plinker
Flank drive;
A type of 12pt or 6pt manufacturing process where the stress put on the corners of a fastener by a socket/wrench is moved to the sides of the fastener there by reducing the risk of rounding/damaging the fastener.

Flank drive plus;
A wrench, combination or otherwise, where the open end of the wrench features either grooves or similar notches on the flats for the purpose of grabbing the sides of the fastener so it doesnt round the fastener. "Flank drive plus" is Snap-ons term/trademark and other brands have a similar feature on thier wrenches under varous names like Opti-torque, Wright drive, ete... It may sound like a gimmick, but it does work really well.

Stubby wrench;
Usually a very short legnth Combination wrench, useful in tight places.

(Open end) Angle wrench;
Useful for getting the open end of the wrench on to fastener at odd angles usually has 30* and 60* offset open ends. Extremely useful for hydraulic lines and diesel engines.

Service wrench;
Typically has one open end with a 30* off set also useful for hydraulic lines and similar things.
[11/17/2011]

Flare nut wrench;
Used on brake lines or soft fittings (brass or similar material) mainly. They are designed to grip the fastener or fitting similar in style to a 6pt wrench for reduced chance of rounding the fitting/fastener.

Crowfoot wrench;
Can be had in traditional open end or flare nut type. Looks like the open end of a wrench with a square drive hole built in. Used in conjunction with a square drive tool to reach hard to access places, or fasteners that are off-set and hidden. Can also be used with a torque wrench to torque fasteners that can only be torqued with an open end.inclusive. That is just not possible. These are not commonly used in conjunction with a ratchet.

(Brake) bleeder wrench:
A type of offset double box wrench made for accessing and loosening brake bleeder screws to bleed hydraulic brake lines.

"S", half-moon or moon wrench, obstruction wrench;
These are speciality type wrenches in various shapes meant to be used in limited access areas such as starter or manifolds.

Saltus wrench;
Similar to a combination wrench, it has an open end and a socket style box end.

Spline or universal socket/wrench;
Designed to work mainly on spline type fasteners will also work on 6pt, 12pt, external torx (E-torx), [B]square, and partialy rounded fasteners.

"Spanner" wrench;
There are two main types, hook and pin. Usually they are found on bicycles or hydraulic cylinder nuts. They are some what a speciality tool and are fairly expensive. They can be had in many different styles.
Just to confuse Americans, most of the world refers to a regular open end wrench as a "spanner".

Adjustable wrench (crescent wrench);
Either loved or hated by the user, they are an old standby wrench that still sees lots of use today. One jaw is fixed while the other slides by means of an adjusting screw. When in use, it can slip off the fastener if not re-adjusted to fit the fastener often. They are also designed to be turned so the fixed jaw takes force from being pulled, some have the direction the wrench is meant to be turned in stamped on the handle.

Breaker bar or flex handle;
A square drive tool that predates the ratchet. Mainly used to break fasteners loose before using a ratchet.

"T" handle/bar;
Another old style square drive tool similar to the breaker bar. These are fairly common in motorcycle and small engine garages but have primarily become obsolete.

Speeder;
Square drive tool used to snug fasteners for final tightening, Pretty much outdated by most modern air tools. Still used by some, especially in the aircraft industry.

Cheater bar (sometimes "Cheater pipe");
This is using your tool WRONG. Cheater bar refers to placing a length of pipe (usually >2ft) on the handle of a ratchet or breaker bar (among other tools) to increase the leverage, thus increase the force applied on the stuck fastener. It is common for the teeth in a ratchet to sheer off allowing the mechanism to "free-wheel" (teeth not catching) or for the pin holding the bit on a breaker bar to shear off. Again, the use of a cheater bar is NOT recommended and can result in injury to personnel and tools.~puttsy

Knuckle Buster;
Although not the name of a specific tool, cheap ratchets and/or wrenches may be referred to as such. This is reference to when a ratchet or wrench slips on a fastner thus, sending your knuckles into the ground or other hard object adjacent of the force you applied. A ratchet that reverses direction accidentally (due to operator error or poorly designed mechanisms) may be referred to as a knuckle buster. This is else the case if a ratchet "Free-wheels" because the pawl or gears have stripped out. 12-point wrenches are often called as such as well because they may round off a hex (most common) or square fastener resulting in the tool slipping and knuckles hitting hard object.~puttsy

12/19/2011


Also, items marked with ** are additions from as well as all terms below the red. @plinker. Thx!

Items marked with ~puttsy are by me but align more appropriately with another members additions.

Dates are added in italics to keep track of edits. Read UP
If I have forgotten something (VERY likely) or gotten something wrong (even MORE likely), please let me know through a PM. That way I can correct it on here (or add it here) and avoid confusing people.

Thanks for looking and I hope it helps.

Information on here is subject to interpretation. This is all collective interpretation of information found through research and experience. All information on here is personal opinion and interpretation and may not be the beliefs or opinions of the businesses or holdings associated with members. Please do not share this information elsewhere without my permission. Content is property of the owner (puttsy) as well as of the other members who have contributed. Please credit them where credit is due. The information presented here is primarily the American (United States) names/phrases of these tools. English(British/UK and other EU countries use slightly different names/naming scheme. If this affects you, please PM me with YOUR name of the tool and an explanation of why it should be added.


Also!

Before posting things that should be added, please look at the wikipedia article for wrenches. If it is included in THAT article (with pictures), it doesn't really need to be on here. This is because your average schmuck (me) can look at the wikipedia article and get to know what a wrench is BUT, again, your average schmuck (me, again) can't look at the wikipedia page to determine what "Raised-Panel", "Roto-Head", etc... means. This list is not and will not be all inclusive. That is just not possible.

Last edited by puttsy; 01-15-2012 at 10:38 PM.
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:52 PM   #4
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Striking Wrench or Striker wrench;
These are a one sided wrench, primarily with a box end, that are made to be struck--hit with a hammer. They have a 'block' where a standard combination wrench would continue to the open end. This allows a strong blow from a hammer or hand-sledge to loosen stuck fasteners. Commonly used to tighten or loosen the nut on a trailer-hitch ball.
~puttsy
3/2/2012

Corner Engagement or Off Corner Engagement;
This is used to describe where a wrench 'grabs' and 'turns' on a fastener. Many combination/Box-end wrenches engage on the corners of a hex fastener this, increasing the risk of rounding off the corners. Corner Engagement describes where a particular wrench friction point/force is applied on the fastener. This is usually used to describe a wrench that fits snug on a fastener so a great deal of the stress is applied to the sides of a fastener instead of the corners to minimize the risk of rounding off.

Following information is from @plinker. Thanks!

Torque wrench;
Used to tighten fasteners to a specfic torque.

There are various styles and sizes to be had; click type, split beam, beam style are examples. Graduated usually in either foot pounds or inch pounds (there are 12 inch pounds per foot pound).

They are a fragile tool that can get out of calibration very easily if dropped or used carelessly. Never use them as a breaker bar or to loosen a fastener!
If click type they should always be lowered to the zero or the lowest setting. They should be checked and/or recalibrated every so often to maintain them in working order. Most will come with a certificate stating they are withen spec.

~
They come in analouge or digital styles. The most common, and generally the most percise style is a digital torque wrench. These have a small LCD readout that gives the force(ft. lbs.(foot pounds) or in.-lbs. (inch pounds)) An analouge one has a "scale/dial" readout similar to a standard bathroom scale.
~puttsy

Torque angle gauge;
Used with a torque wrench or breaker bar to turn torque to yield bolts found on engine heads.
Bolts are first torqued to spec, then turned a certin amount (3/4 turn or 90* for example). This tool will indicate how many degree's you have turned the fastener.

Torque multiplier;
Also used with a torque wrench, they are used to increase the amount of torque applied from the torque wrench. It multiplies the torque output of the torque wrench by means of planetary gears. Just like torque wrenchs, these are also something fragile to be taken good care of.

~To be considered a torque multiplier, usually a force of 4-times greater than manual force is applied by the tool.~puttsy

Gearless ratchet;
Gearless ratchets are something you either love or hate, the head can be bulky, they are usually a sealed ratchet, not menat to be taken apart. They do have swing arc of about 3* or less.
They use a sprag clutch instead of a gear. A sprag is a essentially a "one way bearing", they are used in transmissions. They do not "click" like a geared ratchet does.
It is adviseable to soak them in ATF every so often to lube them.
They have some possible advantages over geared ratchets, but in general have not caught on.

Pass-thru / vortex / ;
Essentially a socket and ratchet system that is a hybrid of a ratcheting wrench and regular square drive ratchet.
Useful for long bolts, studs and threaded rod, Or when a deep socket isnt deep enough. Can have potential use as an "Access" tool, where a ratchet and socket wont fit or be the best for the job at hand.

Broaching Offset;
This is a term used in referring to the box-endof a wrench; usually a combination wrench or other variant. It is the 15* tilt at the head to allow for a 30* working angle, if the wrench is "zero offset", it means the wrench is flat, or "parallel with the beam" where the beam is the space between the ends; the 'raised panel' portion on an RP wrench.
Thanks @xroad


Hi-lok ratchet; (description borrowed from an older thread)
Hi-lok ratchets are for use in aviation. They have a hole so you can put an allen wrench down the middle to hold the inside of a fastener while you turn, it.
Think of a hi-lok as a countersunk screw, but with no drive in the head. There's a female hex in the threaded end. You put the "nut" (hi-lok collar) on it, put your ratchet/socket on, then put an allen wrench through that hole into the end of the hi-lok, and tighten.
The collar has a ring cut into it, so the part the socket drives snaps off at a preset torque, leaving a perfectly round "nut" on the fastener.
Technically, if the hi-lok fits right, the allen wrench should never be needed in the first place, but that's another story...

Thx @mrshaun & @nissan_crawler

Ratcheting open end wrench;
Generally thought of as a "gimmick" tool.
They can be useful in the right circumstance, such as turning the adjusment nuts on a hay elevator where the bolt is only accessable with an open end wrench.

Chain wrench;
Used to hold irregular or odd shaped objects, can also be used to hold pulleys with something to protect the pully from damage.

Strap wrench;
Similar to a chain wrench, but uses a nylon or similar material strap instead of a chain. Used on plumbing fixtures where it will not damage the finish, oil filters, and similar items where item need to be held without damage.

Pipe wrench;
An adjustable type wrench with teeth in the jaws, primarily designed to work with pipe, but can be used for other things where the grip of the teeth is needed.
The teeth will damage/mar surfaces, use with care. They are also a useful weapon in the game Clue!


Spinner or spinner handle;
Just a basic screwdriver handle with a shaft for attaching a socket to. Normally a 1/4 drive tool, some are available in 3/8 drive. Some have a square drive hole on the end for use as a extension.

Ratchet adapter;
A square drive tool, similar in look to a socket but with a ratchet mechansiam built in. Used to add a ratcheting action to a breaker bar or toqure wrench or similar tools that are "fixed" and do not ratchet themselves.

FOD IE; foriegn object damage;
A big issue with aircraft repair and similar fields where you cannot have small bits of stuff falling into or getting lost in the item your working on and causing havoc.
They make FOD ratchets (teardrop style), they are like regular ratchets but the cover plate is riveted on instead of held together with screws to prevent any parts from contaminating the work.

12/20/2011

SAE or S.A.E;
Society of Automotive Engineers This is the group/organization/coalition the develops the standards for US/American automotive/autos standards. Commonly seen on Imperial/SAE size tools. Tools measured in inches/fractional are primarily SAE certified or just SAE sized tools.
~puttsy

1/17/2012

Last edited by puttsy; 04-16-2012 at 07:25 PM.
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:12 PM   #5
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Very nice!
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:16 PM   #6
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Yes, nice. Are you going to explore the universe of open end ratcheting wrenches? There must be dozens of designs, versions and patents. Some with moving parts some without. They have been around a long time and just about every well known company made them at one time or another. I saw some in an early 60s Craftsman catalog on RoseAntiqueTools.com earlier today.
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:28 PM   #7
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

It is important to point out that 'teeth' is a poor method to measure ratchet swing arc as it is non-linear and has a diminishing return on additional teeth.
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:12 PM   #8
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Wow! What a quick response.
Some links that some people might find interesting:

How many ratchet teeth do you consider fine tooth?
~matthew


Ratchet mechanisms: How they work:
~bonneyman

How you should maintain your ratchets! Thx ~Stephenw


A short ratchet tutorial. Dissembling, lubing, and spring clipping

~Kirbot

Alloy-Artifacts. Because a good thread about tools always needs an a-a link!

If anyone can snag the original pics from the ratchet forum, I would be glad to host them elsewhere, please!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe B. View Post
It is important to point out that 'teeth' is a poor method to measure ratchet swing arc as it is non-linear and has a diminishing return on additional teeth.
Excellent point. I would love a further explanation though. I can't think of a good way to explain it (I'm a novice when it comes to this sort of stuff)

Quote:
Originally Posted by kxxr View Post
Yes, nice. Are you going to explore the universe of open end ratcheting wrenches? There must be dozens of designs, versions and patents. Some with moving parts some without. They have been around a long time and just about every well known company made them at one time or another. I saw some in an early 60s Craftsman catalog on RoseAntiqueTools.com earlier today.
If I knew anything about them [Read: Anything] I gladly would. If you can give a brief description of them I would be glad to add it though; I honestly have only seen them online.


Also, I reference Craftsman tools multiple times. This is only because I turn wrenches occasionally and I'm a college student. Since I only do minimal work on cars and maintenance/upkeep on small engines (mowers and blowers), I don't need tool truck type or professional quality tools nor can I afford them. But I don't like the cheap of the cheap that is hit-and-miss if it will work (or still be in one piece) when I need them.

-------------------
More essential terms and acronyms: (These are here because I don't feel they belong in the mass of guides)
Here are terms forum members use but the average schmuck (me) is dumb/foreign to.

ATF;
Automatic Transmission Fluid Used to lubricate transmissions. Many forum members refer to this when discussing lubricating ratchets.

RLL or Red Lube of Love;
This is an "Engine Assembly Fluid" (~whatever that means). Again, many use this to lubricate ratchets. It is Permatex 81950 Ultra Slick Engine Assembly Lube. Many users complain because it is red and tends to "Bleed" (Leak) out of the head of a ratchet. This "Bleeding" issue is not much of an issue on "Sealed-Head ratchets". Permatex product page

Supposedly Armstrong ratchets don't make friends with this. But your milage may vary

Thx @Lomotil

Super-Lube;
This is actually the name of the lube. It is what is used from the factory in Snap-On ratchets and is found in a tube. Synco/Superlube 21030 Multipurpose Synthetic Based Grease or Super Lube synthetic grease #21030 made by Synco/Super-lube. Super Lube product page

MMO;
Marvel Mystery Oil. As with Super-Lube, Marvel Mystery oil is actually it's name. Most people say use grease, NOT oil in a ratchet but some people feel Marvel Mystery oil is a fair comprimise. Turtle Wax/Marvel Mystery product page.
~puttsy This is the factory issue lube used in Armstrong ratchets. Thanks ~MrMark

Rem oil;
Remington Oil is an oil from Remington (The arms/guns/ammunition company) that is primarily used to clean metal parts on guns. It also helps remove moisture and prevent oxidation(rust) and corrosion of the metal components both internal and external. Similar to most "greases" mentioned, it 'applies' a thin film (teflon) that keeps actions moving smoothly. Go easy with the trigger finger though. Remington product page.

Syn Grease;
This is synthetic or Semi-synthetic grease. The "syn" respectively abbreviates 'synthetic'.

Bio-Grease;
This seems to be Biodegradeable grease but is the brand-name for Pedro's multi-purpose grease. Pedro product page.

Dow 33 or Molykote 33;
This is another brand-name lubricant. It is primarily sold as a bearing grease but, many people recommend bearing grease for ratchets so it's fitting. It is made by the Dow company and sold as Molykote 33. Dow product page.

Break-Free CLP;
The CLP stands for Cleans, Lubricates & Protects or alternatly, to fit the companies profile: cleaners, lubricants and preservative which are the products 'Break-Free' produces. Break Free is the brand-name for a company which is a top manufacturer of synthetic lubricants. Break-Free product page.
Thx @Fedwrench

Lucas Lube;
Lucas is the name brand of a company. Often people just call their Lucas "High Performance Assembly Lube" Lucas Lube or similar. Also contains "Moly" similar to a few other lubricants. Lucas product page

OLube or Parker O-lube;
This is an o-ring lubricant (normally for rubber washers/o-rings) that some people use. It is made by the Parker company. Parker Super-O-Lube is the companies product name. Parker product page

Lubriplate 105 or No. 105, or just Lubriplate;
Often misspelled Lubraplate i.e. lubraplate. This is a whitish, (sometimes called off-white, clearish, or "gray after use") calcium based Motor Assembly Grease. Sold in a tube. This is considered an anti-seize grease and is often installed with a swab or brush instead of directly splooged onto the mechanisms. Lubriplate is the co.'s name and they sell several other lubricants/greases. [URL="http://www.lubriplate.com/products/greases/no-105-motor-assembly-grease.html"]Lubriplate No. 105 product page[/I]
Thanks @wreckercologist

Note:
It seems the consensus is that for:
Fine tooth ratchets; wheel bearing grease |
Course ratchets; Turbine oil.

Using too much grease can cause your ratchets to bind (lock up/seize up) or to be too loose /smooth. Hate having things too loose [insert @mrholeshot comment here.] and flopping all over the place. I'm not witty enough to think of anything other than, well, I'll leave it to him.

Again, for a much, MUCH BETTER decription and thorough walkthrough of ratchet maintenence and advice, our resident ratchet expert Stephenw
has a great write-up about it, as linked to at the top of this comment.
12/20/2011

Last edited by puttsy; 02-18-2012 at 07:15 PM.
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:34 PM   #9
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

thanks for putting all that together. some of us that are around tools day in and day out know all that info by heart. but for a beginner it can be a little daunting and confusing. so hopefully this answers a lot of question that someone new to the tool community might have.
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:44 PM   #10
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

You have a copywrite on a innerweb forum post?


Bawahahahahahaha
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Old 12-18-2011, 12:51 AM   #11
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrkMtnDew View Post
thanks for putting all that together. some of us that are around tools day in and day out know all that info by heart. but for a beginner it can be a little daunting and confusing. so hopefully this answers a lot of question that someone new to the tool community might have.
Yeah, my thoughts exactly. Only I'm from the '...beginner is can be daunting and confusing side.' I started looking for a longer handle Craftsman ratchet and a Flex-head ratchet about 2 months ago (about when I joined the forum! Imagine that) and A LOT of the information I saw from searches and from responses of great guys like you, lost me at "Hello". It may sound terse but, it was so very true. I looked ALL OVER to figure out what "Raised Panel" meant. I thought it had to do with the plate held in my the snap-ring on my ratchets. I was WAY wrong...and, when I saw "Raised Panel wrenches" I became totally dumbfounded. Hopefully this will at least help a few people just picking up a wrench. And as I stated in one of my first forum posts, I use my mechanics tools maybe once a week (except when I play with them because I've got um'. Gotta admit we all sometimes do that) so it was a very tough transition to understand automotive speak.

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You have a copywrite on a innerweb forum post?


Bawahahahahahaha
It's worth a shot, isn't it!? :P If I was too concerned about it, I'd sell it as an eBook that's on perpetual sale for "50% off if you order NOW! This weekend only! 100% money back guarantee!"

I just ask that the people who contribute it get credited if they reference it elsewhere.
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:51 AM   #12
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

I hate the over use of acronyms. I have to try to understand nursing acronyms from wife then mechanic ones elsewhere.
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Old 12-18-2011, 02:30 AM   #13
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

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Originally Posted by puttsy View Post
Hey all, I’ve asked several questions about wrenches, ratchets, and many other tools here but was often lost by responses that used grease-money, mechanic, tool junkie, motor-head, etc… jargon
Some more things for you to possibly research:

gearless ratchet
obstruction/starter-manifold/"moon" wrench
"S" wrench
"bleeder" wrench
pass through/vortex/eliminator/special forces ratchet
crowfoot
"flank drive plus"
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:10 AM   #14
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

One correction...

'flare nut wrench' is not the same thing as a crowfoot. 'flare wrench' generally means the standalone flare wrench, 'crowfoot' alone means an open end crowfoot, and then there's 'crowfoot flare'. The reason the flare is useful is as you mentioned, more contact than an open end, but an opening so you can get them on a pipe/hose fitting (which you obviously can't do with a box or closed socket).

To add to diesel research's comment...

Might as well add "zero offset" wrenches and when/why they're better/worse than the typical 10 to 15 degree box end.

Then there are the open back angle socket wrenches like these from Facom which are sometimes useful on upper strut nuts and the like:



And hinged socket wrenches (which may have one hinged and one box, one hinged and one open end, or both ends hinged):





There are of course many more.

Last edited by dwm; 12-18-2011 at 04:32 AM.
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:19 AM   #15
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

I have a couple of small suggestions if you don't mind a critique. The sentence at the beginning of "RHNSFT," while technically true doesn't make a lot of sense as a but statement. Also, spanner wrench is only incorrect in the sense that it's redundant, like saying "wrench wrench" the confusion arises because sometimes in the American market manufacturers nonsensically call tools like pin spanners and hook spanners "spanner wrenches." For what it's worth, the wikipedia article for "wrench" is pretty exhaustive and might save you a lot of typing / copyright concerns. A list of obscure garage journal specific acronyms (like RHNSFT, who uses that?) would be pretty helpful though. My personal terminology beef is when sellers in the classifieds assume everybody is a walking snap-on part number dictionary.
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Old 12-18-2011, 05:56 AM   #16
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

And these : (feel free to delete this post when needed to reduce clutter)

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Old 12-18-2011, 08:36 AM   #17
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Click the picture for my ratchet maintenance article...

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Old 12-18-2011, 09:33 AM   #18
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Not sure if you talked about the Flexible reversible double Box Universal Spline Wrenches?
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Old 12-18-2011, 09:43 AM   #19
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

Good post another name for the hinged wrench is Saltus, which dwm is showing a picture of.
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Old 12-18-2011, 09:58 AM   #20
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Default Re: Beginners guide to ratchets and wrenches.

OP, good job on the guide.



Quote:
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I hate the over use of acronyms. I have to try to understand nursing acronyms from wife then mechanic ones elsewhere.
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