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Old 12-10-2007, 03:28 PM   #1
nonhog
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Default Fixing a moisture problem

As many of you know I am about to get my garage/shop floor poured and don't want moisture problems . (differant thread) Anyone here fixed a moisture issue ? I see products like BIO VEE SEAL , anyone used it ? Or maybe Bondtite 1501 . The garage attached to our home has alot of dampness and I would love to stop it or at least make it better. I will fix any drainage issues around the garage but its from underneath thats the issue.
ideas ? thanks
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Old 12-12-2007, 12:57 AM   #2
nu guy ky
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

I was going to ask the same question I'm sure we will find the answer here

My Prob is the slab and blocks have been up for a while

it has been raing here so Everything is put on hold

Last week they came out to top out the ggarage--
Sat got a real good start on laying the roof---Yeah rain

Rain sat night ALL DAY SUNDAY ---AND OFF AND on Monday
Today it was 73 deg out partly sunny .The roofer showed back up

But before he did I took a blower and dried down the insde
best I could...

Severla hours later it look like it rained in the garage.. We had a nice wind
So I opened all three windows get some air in the garage

Now the doors are not on as of yet ...

And I did not puat a vapor stop down I guess I went Brain dead
on that One never thought of it Till after it was Poured My Bud ask if I did
put a vapor block down I'M LIKE SHET NO HOW DID I FORGET THAT.. ERRRR
Why you asking me now You should have been asking me several days ago
Oh well what is done is done..

So here is the Question I was looking at two products one is
ULG DRYLOK INT AND EXT

the other is a BEHR PRODUCT ALSO MADE FOR CINDERBLOCKS FOUNDATIONS-
CONCRETE. ECT..HAS any one used these products Or would you go with another product..

Thanks FOR ANY HELP WITH THIS PLEASE Thanks
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Old 12-18-2007, 06:16 PM   #3
nonhog
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

Anybody ? previous threads ? Ideas ? thanks !
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Old 12-18-2007, 08:56 PM   #4
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

On a new pour... use BondTite 1501...

For existing... BondTite 1101 has been used to fix moisture issues. While there are not products that guarantee they will fix every problem, BondTite 1101 has a few things going for it. First, it's never ever failed. Second, it has phenomenal adhesion. Third, it's not sensitive to moisture during application.

NOW... Moisture problems are not 'general'... rather... they are usuallly specific and the solution is specific to the exact problem.

If you want to discuss your specific problem you can tell us about your issue here: http://wolverinecoatings.com/html/contacts.html

Someone will get back to you... we will eventually need some pics and maybe some phone conversation.
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Old 12-21-2007, 10:24 AM   #5
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

Wolverine,

Without giving the whole chemical break down (I wouldn't understand it anyway!), what is the difference between BondTite 1501 and 1101?

By "new pour", do you mean REALLY fresh? I poured a slab about a year ago. NO VEHICLE has ever been on it. Just guys on foot building the structure on top. So it's virgin concrete in a why, but a year or more old. Which would be the more appropriate product, 1501 or 1101?
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Old 12-22-2007, 09:41 PM   #6
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

I'm hoping I can jump in on this thread & get some info from wolverine, I have a slab without a vapor barrier that is 6 months old & if you put cardboard down on the ground the next day its damp & so is the floor. I just put heaters out there this week for drywalling (propape, no exhaust vents) and the floor is wet almost everywhere.

Can the bontite 1101 be used by itself for quite some time before one has time to actually put the epoxy down over it at a later time? my shop is 36x48 so its a large expense.

I also have a huge sweating problem with the steel siding on the shop & 6"inch insulation. I'm hoping the bondtite 1101 can slow down some of the humidity getting in the building from the flooring?
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Old 12-22-2007, 09:48 PM   #7
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

I'm working with Bill and Eric at Wolverine. According to them, the 1501 is a curing sealer and has to be applied within 24 hours of the pour.

Pics of the build and floor are here-
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...ewpost&t=11919

-j
Quote:
Originally Posted by DynoDave View Post
Wolverine,

Without giving the whole chemical break down (I wouldn't understand it anyway!), what is the difference between BondTite 1501 and 1101?

By "new pour", do you mean REALLY fresh? I poured a slab about a year ago. NO VEHICLE has ever been on it. Just guys on foot building the structure on top. So it's virgin concrete in a why, but a year or more old. Which would be the more appropriate product, 1501 or 1101?
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Old 12-22-2007, 10:21 PM   #8
DynoDave
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by g17jimmy View Post
I'm working with Bill and Eric at Wolverine. According to them, the 1501 is a curing sealer and has to be applied within 24 hours of the pour.

Pics of the build and floor are here-
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...ewpost&t=11919

-j
Thanks g17jimmy. So 1501 is out for me, as my slab is over a year old. The question now is, will 1101 work on an older pour that has fully cured?
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Old 12-23-2007, 10:30 AM   #9
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

If you have moisture coming up THROUGH the slab it may be that the gravel under the slab isn't draining. If you go to the lowest side of the building, you should be able to dig down into and below the gravel layer. If you find moisture, you can just put in a French drain around the perimeter.

My slabs have a vapor barrier over 4" of gravel. We only have moisture problems when we have a cold snap followed by a warm rain and have the doors open. The cold floors cause the humidity to condense on the surface of the concrete. If you have oil dry on the floor it turns to glue...
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Old 01-04-2008, 06:00 PM   #10
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Wink Re: Fixing a moisture problem

Hi guys... this may help your situation...
Several years ago i was called to a problem with one of our customers that had rising damp through a 150mm concrete slab that formed their garage under a three storey town house.. regulations here in the uk do not call for a damp proof membrane within garages so we had constructed it satisfactory to the regulations. Not content with pushing the customer away i spent a few days investigating what we could do to help the problem.. also i knew the company would not front the cost of ripping the up the floor so my options had to be on the cheap side.
The customer still used his garage for cars and to make matters worse he had to drive in on the angle so any surface treatment would scuff off.
I looked at several manufactures all claiming to solve the problem in one way or another but giving it some thought i came up with the following.
I needed something that would soak into the concrete pores, set, and seal the concrete whilst not leaving a coating on the top. Any surface treatment would brush off or wear off when the car turned.
after spending 6 weeks visiting the floor it had its own behaviour damp issues. about a day after heavy rain moisture would soak up through the floor and darken the concrete , three days without rain leaving the front garage door & single rear door open for ventilation the moisture had disapeared and the concrete looked dry. This was a reoccuring pattern.. put down humidity, air pressure & capilary action....
We purchased some basic water repealant silicon that is normally sprayed onto surface brickwork and sprayed it onto the surface with a cheap hand pressure sprayer.
the concrete was dry when we applied the coats and teh first coat was sucked into the concrete, a second coat was applied the next day, the concrete darkened to a wet look colour and remained so. tow days later we returned, where some pooling of the sealer had remained ontop a very thin crust was formed which was brushed off..
http://www.edirectory.co.uk/pf/880/m...r/pid/31838401
The floor looked uniform in coulour though this ws now slightly darker than wet concrete. A test of cup of water was thrown over the floor and it just sat on the surface not sinking in. Our thoughts were as the top 1" or so of concrete was now effectively sealed water could not be drawn up through by cappilary action and leave via the surface. Two days later we applied two coats of garage floor paint (solvent based onto the concrete)did it work? well we checked 1 year later and the chap was delighted.. problem was solved... floor paint was unworn and the moisture problem dissapeard overnight. I called in to see him today (4 years on)but he has moved last year, the new owners have reported no problems what so ever.. the floor paint was showing slight thinning where the turning was.
In my opinion it worked a treat & cost no more than £100 + labour about 1 day... I not saying it would work in your situation and certainly I would imagine you have to get the floor dry for the material to soak in... but in this situation it worked brilliant.
Either way hope this helps in some way

Good luck

Andy

Last edited by andyj; 01-04-2008 at 06:03 PM.
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Old 01-04-2008, 09:19 PM   #11
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Default Re: Fixing a moisture problem

Hi Guys,

Sorry to make you wait so long to answer questions... We've been BUSY!

Dave... BondTite 1101 is designed for any age concrete that is cured (at least 28 days old). So, yes... it will work... You can request more info here (Don't forget to mention Garage Journal): http://wolverinecoatings.com/html/contacts.html

The BondTite 1501 is designed for 'green' concrete... that means... you apply it as soon as the concrete is hard enough to walk on and there is no ponding water AND within 24 hours! This product is a 'one of a kind' that allows the concrete to be coated WITHOUT WAITING the traditional 28 days. HOWEVER, this product is not designed for older concrete and should only be used on fresh 'green' concrete.

So, BondTite 1501 and BondTite 1101 are COMPLETELY different products. They are as different as night and day. The BondTite 1101 will stick to just about any prepared surface (wood, cured concrete, metal, plastics, stainless steel, aluminum... etc.) except 'green' concrete. The BondTite 1501 has awesome adhesion to green concrete but only marginal adhesion (about like other waterbased products) to other substrates. * Keep in mind that what we say is marginal adhesion is considered 'great adhesion' by other paint manufacturers.
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