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Old 09-16-2005, 11:34 PM   #1
Cebby
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Default "Cinder" block garage - encapsulate somehow?

My garage is pretty old. We estimate that is was initially built in the 30's or 40's.

It is a detached 2 car 2 story building. My question is what can I apply to the block to keep it from deteriorating - currently, if I rub my hands over the block, it feels like sand falling off of the block (not sure if that makes sense). These are not like normal present day concrete blocks. It is currently untreated and not top coated in anyway.

One side of the building will need something extra durable applied since I'm adding a parking pad and the wall will likely get balls bounced off of it by my kids.
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Old 09-16-2005, 11:52 PM   #2
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That's a good question. I would think any kind of coating would not stick since the surface is already deteriorating. Removing part of the surface that is deteriorated and then coating the good, lower layer may be something you can do... but that will depend on how thick the "bad" layer is.
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Old 09-17-2005, 05:56 AM   #3
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might want to consider getting a mason to look at the blocks and make sure they are sound.
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Old 09-17-2005, 06:37 AM   #4
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Quikrete makes a product called Surface Bonding Cement, applies with a trowel and gives a stucco like appearance

http://www.quikrete.com/catalog/QUIK...ingCement.html
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Old 09-17-2005, 12:17 PM   #5
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if the surface is unstable... (sanding) then the quickcrete material will fail also. You need a solid stable surface first.

you may need to try a sealer first to "glue" the sand in place first then any type stucco type finish should be fine. if a sealer will not stablize the surface and the blocks are still sounf all i could think of would be side it. then at least the weather will not advance the sanding of the surface
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Old 09-18-2005, 08:26 AM   #6
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I've been a Bricklayer for 30 yrs. If you want you can send me some pics and I'll try to give some advice. You might try sandblasting to get to stable surface and then try a coating to prevent futher damage. What is the climate like where you live? Freeze thaw cycle?
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Old 09-19-2005, 03:29 PM   #7
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you could do what I did to my block bld..it was made of ''hadite'' block, suppose to be lighter and more thermal inulating..ha , NOT..they are softer and started to crumble from the heat/cold cycle and water vapor coming thru...

we stripped the bld with 2x4's by using tapcon screws..put some styrofoam insulation between the strips and then covered it with steel roof siding..

made it look nicer, and helped become warmer too.

Jim
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Old 09-19-2005, 05:03 PM   #8
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OK, here's some pics. First two pics are the exterior, last two are the interior. I went out and rubbed my hands all over the outside - it isn't as bad as I thought. After the initial loose material comes off, they are pretty solid. It is a pretty dramatic difference in appearance from the exterior to the interior though...

Exterior:





Interior:


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