Welcome to the The Garage Journal Board forums.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   The Garage Journal Board > The Garage > Garage Gallery

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-16-2012, 01:31 AM   #1
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Cool The Scooter Workshop

Current Status, April 5th, 2015:

The fourth wall is just about done, and there's only a little bit of drywall detail around the shop to address.




Current Status, February 26th, 2014:

The first wall is done and it's starting to look like an actual workshop!






Read on for the whole story!
__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)

Last edited by Modern Jess; 04-05-2015 at 10:23 PM.
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 01:32 AM   #2
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

The Story

About a year and a half ago, my wife and I bought a new house. My commute (100 miles a day, 50 miles each way through the SF Bay Area) was killing me, and I desperately needed a break. I also needed a garage, having never had one of my own. The house we eventually bought is only 7 miles from work, has an attached garage (which I've already finished, see Casa de Scoota) and looks just like every other house in the neighborhood. Literally. Just another tract home from the 1960s, when most of the area was developed.

This house has a secret, though: there's a second garage, completely detached, right behind the main garage. You can't see it from the street, and in fact the MLS listing for the house failed to mention it or show any pictures of it whatsoever. It's a completely legal and permitted structure, so the selling agents blew it. I only knew it was there because I was looking for exactly this kind of house, checking the satellite view of over 800 houses before I found the perfect candidate.

You see, I've got a scooter problem. You know, Vespas and their ilk. I have more than I can count at any given moment, and they take up a lot of space. I have motorcycles too (two of them, at the moment) but scooters are my thing. In addition to needing a place to park all the damn things, I need a place to work on them. I'm also an amateur fabricator / machinist / welder, though not skilled at any of those things. In an effort to get better (and continue to work on scooters) I need a space that can get dirty.

The Starting Point
This building was built specifically to be a workshop in 1966, and has been a workshop for its entire existence. It's about the same size as the garage (20x22) and had some very, very old shelves and benches when I got my hands on it. All the walls were 1/8" MDF wood paneling, too -- nice and flammable.

Here's what it looked like at the start:



















__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)

Last edited by Modern Jess; 02-27-2014 at 12:33 AM.
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 10-16-2012, 01:45 AM   #3
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

The Doors
While the main house was getting a new kitchen, we had a couple weeks of downtime waiting for the @#$%& kitchen cabinets to be delivered, and my contractor was, errr... idle. I turned him loose on one of the more pressing workshop projects, which was getting rid of the rotting flip-up garage door.

The big door on the workshop was facing the back wall of the garage, which had also had its own matching garage door at some point in the past, presumably to pull cars all the way through to the rear shop. The rear door of the garage had long since been filled in, though, and so the big flip-up garage door was largely useless. In addition to being rotten (wood on concrete, duh) it was also drafty and an open invitation to pests.

My contractor took off most of the front wall, installed a concrete curb, and re-framed the wall. He also scored a pair of matching four-foot-wide commercial doors (one for the garage and one for the workshop, they face each other) so that I could pull scooters (and motorcycles, heh) straight through without doing the handlebar dance.

I can't tell you how awesome these doors are. No, really. Trust me on this.

The original man door got filled in as well. We needed some re-stuccoing elsewhere on the house, so the wall of the workshop got done at the same time, and the painters painted the whole thing to match the house sometime shortly after these pictures were taken.

















__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 01:58 AM   #4
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

The Workbench

After the dust from the house remodel had settled a bit, I started digging in to the workshop. It had a really solid built-in workbench, which was probably original to the building. It was made (I discovered) from three 20' 2x7 boards, which looked suspiciously identical to the rafters and rafter ties. It was actually a fairly nice bench, but it was keeping me from putting up drywall, and it was in the wrong spot. So sadly, it had to go.

Man. That thing was solid. Between the four gazillion nails holding down the plywood on top of the 20' planks, the planks themselves pretty much refused to come out without a fight.

The shelf above it came down next, along with all of the thin fake paneling.









__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 02:07 AM   #5
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Nature Hates a Vacuum

I'll bet you guys know what happened next. As we moved in to the house (and as I refined the main garage into a showplace) things started, errr... migrating into the workshop. It quickly became little better than a glorified storage unit.









__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 02:14 AM   #6
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Cannonball

And then Cannonball happened. In the scooter world, there's this all-important event (to me) called the Scooter Cannonball Run. It's basically a coast-to-coast timed endurance event, set up as a ten-day stage race, much like the Tour de France. I participated in 2008, sat out 2010, and was compelled to ride again in 2012.

Cannonball is like that ex-girlfriend that you know you shouldn't go back to, but you do anyway. It is simultaneously ecstatic and miserable, equal parts anxiety, danger, discomfort, and joy.

The next four months were spent preparing my bike (seen below) for Cannonball, and preparing myself for the misadventure I had signed up for. All progress on the workshop ceased.

I did manage to buy a really nice motorcycle lift, though!

(The gouge on the side of the bike is from Cannonball 2008. I had a bit of a disagreement with a steep gravel switchback out in the remote wilds of Utah. Needless to say, I lost).



__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)

Last edited by Modern Jess; 07-25-2016 at 09:13 PM.
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 07:33 AM   #7
Dillithium
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 151
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

That's looking pretty sweet! I'm looking forward to see what it will turn into.
So, for these scooter runs, do you stick with 50cc?
Dillithium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 08:39 AM   #8
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillithium View Post
So, for these scooter runs, do you stick with 50cc?
Not me, though it's been done. There are a whole range of scooter sizes that compete, both vintage and modern. Times are scored according to a handicap (which takes into account the size and age of the bike) in order to level the playing field. A 50cc scooter has a ridiculously low handicap, but doing it in 10 days (350-ish miles per day) means getting up in the wee hours of the morning and getting in to the designated hotel long after everyone else has gone to sleep. So you kind of miss the social aspect of the event altogether.

And nobody has ever come close to winning on a 50cc scooter, either. The sweet spot is somewhere around 200cc to 250cc, depending on the specific bike. Mine is "kitted" (large bore 259cc cylinder with high-performance cylinder head) and I use an auxiliary gas tank on the back so that I can ride all day without stopping, or stopping once at most.
__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)

Last edited by Modern Jess; 10-16-2012 at 08:58 AM.
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 09:51 AM   #9
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

After Cannonball, I avoided the shop (and scooters) for a while. My wife and I adopted a dog from the local dog pound, I finished off a few projects around the house, and generally ignored the 400 square foot gorilla in the back yard.

Eventually, though, I had to get back to it.

Electrical

I'm not afraid of electricity, but I am afraid of putting an outlet in the wrong spot, or needing to rip open a wall when I want to re-arrange things. This is especially true when there are dedicated 220v outlets for the larger equipment. Basically, I'm afraid to commit to a specific location for anything.

My solution (borrowed from a friend of mine) was to run Wiremold 4000 conduit around the perimeter of the shop, and have none of the electrical behind drywall. Unfortunately, Wiremold conduit is a little on the expensive side, and I was reluctant to sink that much cash into conduit. Fortunately, the same friend that introduced me to the concept also had access to an industrial building that was being demolished, and secured permission to salvage some of the extensive amounts of Wiremold from the building. We spent a day removing tons of conduit, fittings, and accessories from the building, working around the crew that was getting the last of the massive newspaper printing press equipment out of the building.

That left me with a giant pile of Wiremold on my garage floor, which I am slowly fitting into the workshop. Theoretically, I'll be able to rewire the entire workshop just by popping off the panels and running new wire and outlets.

(The feed to the subpanel is temporary, as is the feed to the lights coming off the top of the panel -- in the near future, a proper service entrance will be installed and the lights will be fed from conduit running up the wall).



__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 10:56 AM   #10
Kevin54
Senior Member
 
Kevin54's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Urbana, Ohio
Posts: 27,915
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Look great so far. Question though, why didn't you cover the walls before putting the Wiremold on, or are you going to but drywall or whatever wall covering up to it?

Looking forward to some more pics!!!
Kevin54 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 11:37 AM   #11
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin54 View Post
Look great so far. Question though, why didn't you cover the walls before putting the Wiremold on, or are you going to but drywall or whatever wall covering up to it?
Ah. Forgot to mention that detail. I'm going to build out the walls similar to a Mooney Wall, which adds an extra 1.5" of insulation to an existing wall.

The climate around here isn't very cold, but it does get fairly hot in my part of the SF Bay Area, and unconditioned buildings tend to get fairly uncomfortable from solar gain alone. Plus, my shop is situated uncomfortably close to the neighbors on all sides (including their bedroom windows) and so noise abatement is also an issue. Thickening up the walls using horizontal furring will reduce heat conduction through the studs and also limit the amount of noise that escapes through those same studs.

And conveniently, this will also put the Wiremold conduit nearly flush with the finished wall.
__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 11:42 AM   #12
jeffmoss26
Senior Member
 
jeffmoss26's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 9,524
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

very cool! I am subscribing!
__________________
Jeff Moss
Self-proclaimed President of the Harry Epstein Fan Club
Feedback Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by zkling View Post
I really hope this guy drinks heavily then gets on this forum, otherwise, wow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Outlawmws
How can a guy with over 450 pairs of pliers, cutters, tongs, grips etc, have a "favorite"?
jeffmoss26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 11:43 AM   #13
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

A small panorama. This is about 180 degrees of the shop.

__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 11:51 AM   #14
WhoWhatNow
Senior Member
 
WhoWhatNow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Collegeville, PA
Posts: 1,213
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

I spy a Hazet cart!

Cool build.
__________________
Iím a bigger hammer kind of guy.
If it doesnít fit, get a bigger hammer.
WhoWhatNow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 11:52 AM   #15
JimVonBaden
Senior Member
 
JimVonBaden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 14,516
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

You scooter guys are more nuts than us motorcycle guys! LOL

Jim
JimVonBaden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 12:10 PM   #16
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoWhatNow View Post
I spy a Hazet cart!

Cool build.
Thanks! Yep. I discovered the Hazet carts right here on Garage Journal, and lusted after them until I could stand it no more. It's perfect for going back and forth between the shop and the garage, wherever I happen to need to work on a scooter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
You scooter guys are more nuts than us motorcycle guys! LOL
It's a different flavor of the same disease.
__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 06:41 PM   #17
erda
Member
 
erda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Great White North, Eh!
Posts: 70
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Quote:
Originally Posted by Modern Jess View Post
Cannonball

I did manage to buy a really nice motorcycle lift, though!


Looking good!

How do you like your lift? I've been looking at lifts for a while, and the MC615R is on the short list. Is it made in the US or imported?

Thanks.
erda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 07:09 PM   #18
fergus
Senior Member
 
fergus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Yolo County CA
Posts: 1,488
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Hey you suck with the two garages! Looking forward to more.
fergus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 08:04 PM   #19
twistedchief
Member
 
twistedchief's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: CA
Posts: 82
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

looking good there i like the lift too
twistedchief is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2012, 08:21 PM   #20
Modern Jess
Senior Member
 
Modern Jess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 1,249
Default Re: The Scooter Workshop

Quote:
Originally Posted by erda View Post
How do you like your lift? I've been looking at lifts for a while, and the MC615R is on the short list. Is it made in the US or imported?
The lift is awesome. Really well made. I bought it locally, direct from the distributor, who happens to be in the area. That (and that it was reputed to be a great lift) drove my decision. Unfortunately, it is imported, though the quality is very good.

My only complaint is that, as a completely air-based lift, it takes a good bit of compressed air to get all the way up. I get two or maybe three lifts from my little 10-gallon compressor before it cycles back on. Not a dealbreaker, but something to be aware of.
__________________
Check out my Scooter Workshop (build in progress)
Modern Jess is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:10 AM.