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Old 11-07-2005, 12:07 PM   #1
RoadRunner
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Default Running Natural Gas to Garage

Any ideas on getting natural gas from the house to the garage? I will probably call the gas company this week to see what they say. I know in the house we use black iron pipe. I am just looking to see what others have done.
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Old 11-07-2005, 12:11 PM   #2
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I ran corrugated stained steel flex (I believe 1") from the house to the garage. I ran it in a 3-4 inch PVC sleeve. Has to be run deep under ground. Depth depends on code in your area. I ran black pipe up through the garage walls, up to the furnace.

I have a shutoff valve in the basement of the house and one in the attic in the garage.
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Old 11-07-2005, 12:39 PM   #3
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With gas I would not want to use anything other than black iron pipe, definitely no galvanized for this job!
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Old 11-07-2005, 01:00 PM   #4
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Oooohh - make sure you check your local code.

Many areas prohibit anyone from running gas pipe except approved contractors. If you are qualified but not officially, contacting the gas company is going to raise a flag and you may not be able to shake 'em if you want to do it yourself.

Scott
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Old 11-07-2005, 02:45 PM   #5
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MXtras makes an excellent point, it's one of those jobs where you keep your mouth shut, dig below the freeze line, tape connections well and use nothing but black iron, you will have safe heat, keep your money in your pocket, and what the city does'nt know won't hurt them!
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Old 11-07-2005, 02:54 PM   #6
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Exactly.

But it didn't come from me....

Scott
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Old 11-07-2005, 04:47 PM   #7
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Is it OK to run soft copper? They ran it outside at my parents place for the natural gas fireplace. and I MAY have used it for my garage furnace
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Old 11-07-2005, 04:53 PM   #8
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I can't say why not, but my contractor buddy says no, so the answer is no. He is a qualified Gas Contractor.

Personally, I can't see why it would not work, but I guess it has to do with durability and the fact that it can fracture from thermal cycling and vibration. A broken water pipe is one thing, but a broken gas pipe could spawn a front page headline.

Scott
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Old 11-07-2005, 05:12 PM   #9
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Actally you can use copper, but only the one rated for underground use. I forget which is which, but one type has blue lettering and markings on the outide of the tubing, and the other type has red markings. The tubing that is more expensive and has heavier wall thickness is suitable for underground use. The other must with any gas connection out of copper tubing is the ends and all fittings must be done in flare fittings. My personal thoughts on running gas underground go to black iron pipe cause you cannot cut the line with a simple hand shovel, but that's just me.
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Old 11-07-2005, 05:33 PM   #10
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Black pipe will rust underground. It may be thicker than CSST, but is harder to install since you need a tool to thread the ends.

In my area, the gas company does work beyond the meter, so I had to have it installed. Cost about $1000.
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Old 11-07-2005, 06:43 PM   #11
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this is my first ever post on any forum so bare with me, ive just finished installing gas to my garage and its 200 feet from the meter on the house to the back of my garage. anyway the system here in ontario canada consists of a special plastic, yellow in color, in my case the furnace size and distance dictated a 1 inch id .the ends of the plastic require a special elbow of metal that is slid onto the plastic with its own special glue, if you dont get it on right the first time its trash ,at 150.00 a pop.the service has to be installed by licensed gas ticke t holder , almost any good furnace shop should be able to do this.the plastic isnt cheap i think it was about 3 bucks a foot. its buried a t 17 inches down with a wire tracetaped to it .
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Old 11-07-2005, 06:50 PM   #12
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The "plastic" you're referring to is the CSST I've mentioned. Under the yellow plastic coating is stainless steel flex tubing.
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Old 11-07-2005, 07:30 PM   #13
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nope pure plastie about 1/4 inch thick. comes in a big coil , various diameters depending on demand , this is on a low presure system. my house is semi rural and the gas arives at high pressure about 14 psi i understand then at the meter it drops to a volme mesured in inches of water apperantly about 1/4 a of a psi thats how its sent on to the garage ,volume not pressure.
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Old 11-07-2005, 07:36 PM   #14
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i should add that it goes to an honest -40 from time to time and frost goes as much as 4 feet down every winter
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Old 11-07-2005, 07:42 PM   #15
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I have a 200' run going to my garage for my 100,000 btu water heater they used the same stuff that nissantech used. I would have a quaified plumber do it. It is worth the extra money to make sure you don't go boom.

Mike
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Old 11-07-2005, 07:45 PM   #16
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I just had the yellow plastic, don't know what it was called, run out to my garage, direct burial, passed some pretty strict code. This is also what LIPA/Keyspan (Utility Co.) uses for street mains.
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Old 11-07-2005, 08:36 PM   #17
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Here, i see them use rigid, threaded pipe with a yellow plastic covering. Not sure what its called but by description, a supply would know the name. Personally, i wouldnt put flex in the ground.
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Old 11-07-2005, 09:50 PM   #18
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Here is what I used.. It is used by PSEG and many other industrial gas companies around the country. It very easy to work with and the adapters already come with pipe attached.

http://www.perfectioncorp.com


It is very rigid but will still allow some flex. I was told pipe would rust and needs to be painted for code and is not recommended due to the ground settling.

Good Luck, I am in the process now. It is fairly easy.


Thanks,

RK
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Old 11-08-2005, 08:10 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockCrawlingRobK
Here is what I used.. It is used by PSEG and many other industrial gas companies around the country. It very easy to work with and the adapters already come with pipe attached.

http://www.perfectioncorp.com


It is very rigid but will still allow some flex. I was told pipe would rust and needs to be painted for code and is not recommended due to the ground settling.

Good Luck, I am in the process now. It is fairly easy.


Thanks,

RK
This furnace installers used some type of flexibal stainless with an orangish plastic coating. I inquired about it at my plumbing supply place, and they indicated you need ot be certified to purchase (not a major problem, as I am friends with owner of supply house). Anyway, I don't want to install anything that may go Boom. I like the perfectioncorp stuff. It looks like I can contact rep for my area. I may just ask the heating contractor if he is at the house today.

Any other ideas, let me know.
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Old 11-08-2005, 11:28 AM   #20
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We just had the house put on nat. gas a year ago, The gas company did it. I think they only buried it like 2' or so, the frost line here is 4'.
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