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Old 12-09-2005, 08:34 PM   #1
TonyMazz
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Default Floor Drain Ideas

Currently I have a floor drain and it drains through a PVC pipe just to the edge of my foundation on my garage.

I need some ideas as to how to properlly extend the drain and keep it from freezing as I live in Wisconsin.

When washing my cars in my heated garage, the drain plugs periodically and need to stay open so that i can wash my cars/clean the floor year round.

What are some of you doing to manage this ....and yes there'd be some residual oil / grease / dirt etc that would be washed off the vehicles that 'd go down the drain. I am not one to pour oil, gas etc down the drain, but will not be sanitizing it either....

Any ideas....
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Old 12-09-2005, 10:08 PM   #2
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The easiest way to finish it off is to extend the pipe into a drywell. I've done this with my sump pump drain. Make sure the pipe leaving the garage is sufficient diameter and pitch as this will keep the water from freezing inside the pipe. Minimize sharp bends when laying the pipe. 3" would probably do it. Bury the pipe if you can, even if it's a couple of inches - this will help avoid freezing. Also, install a cleanout about a foot outside of the garage in case you get a bad clog. With a cleanout, it will make it easier to clear the clog.

Hope this helps.
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Old 12-10-2005, 09:41 PM   #3
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Thanks sounds like a good plan....now I just have to wait until spring time....I have natural slope that will work.

Just wondering....at the end of the 3" pipe do I just have it drain into the earth or do should I build / bury a bucket with holes in it filled with gravel ??

Make sense or is this just a waste of time ???

Thanks again for your idea....
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Old 12-10-2005, 10:35 PM   #4
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You'll want to dig a hole bigger than a bucket. End the pipe in the well. How much water will you be draining? The well size will be dependent upon that. If the well is too small, you will end up flooding your yard. I would make it 2-3 feet deep, 2-3 feet wide, 2-3 feet long. Line the hole with landscapers cloth. This will prevent dirt from entering the well. Fill the well with 3/4" gravel. Cover the top of the well with landscapers cloth., overlapping the edges to keep dirt from entering the well. Cover the well with dirt.
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Old 12-10-2005, 10:41 PM   #5
TonyMazz
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Thanks sounds like a good plan....now I just have to wait until spring time....I have natural slope that will work.

Just wondering....at the end of the 3" pipe do I just have it drain into the earth or do should I build / bury a bucket with holes in it filled with gravel ??

Make sense or is this just a waste of time ???

Thanks again for your idea....
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Old 12-12-2005, 08:41 AM   #6
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Default Insulate it

Also, cover the drywell with a couple bales of hay or straw (or some other insulating material) This should help keep the drywell from freezing.
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Old 12-16-2005, 02:55 PM   #7
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I have made one with a 55 gallon drum and pea gravel for my pole barn. Here is a link to the complete construction of a dry well with some helpful tips.
http://www.builderswebsource.com/_discBT/0000029c.htm
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Old 01-02-2006, 01:35 AM   #8
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Tony - How is you floor setup to catch the water? It it pitched to catch it at a drain or grate? Was this system installed before or after the floor was poured? I'm planning on building a garage to detail cars out of and I'm wondering what people are doing for drainage. Most cities won't allow drains in garages in residential areas.
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Old 01-02-2006, 01:52 AM   #9
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Easiest way to get around code for drains is to install drain system before pouring the floor, stuff the drain with newspaper, then pour a thin layer of concrete over the drain area. When the final inspection is complete, break away the concrete from the drain.
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Old 01-02-2006, 07:48 AM   #10
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Sneaky!
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Old 01-02-2006, 10:15 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwpower
Easiest way to get around code for drains is to install drain system before pouring the floor, stuff the drain with newspaper, then pour a thin layer of concrete over the drain area. When the final inspection is complete, break away the concrete from the drain.
I've done that in previous homes I built in past years, but the inspectors are hip to that now and the local code folks are paranoid about no floor drains in residential garages; in my area, a garage slab can't be poured unless the inspector is present to witness the start of the pour to ensure there are no "hidden" drains that can be opened later.
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Old 01-02-2006, 10:58 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnZ
I've done that in previous homes I built in past years, but the inspectors are hip to that now and the local code folks are paranoid about no floor drains in residential garages; in my area, a garage slab can't be poured unless the inspector is present to witness the start of the pour to ensure there are no "hidden" drains that can be opened later.
Now that's nuts that they have to see the pour, then again I think they are not that smart in my area. My plumber even recommended it. I didn't go for it, since I didn't want to chance getting my tools, etc. all wet.
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Old 01-02-2006, 06:57 PM   #13
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Here's another idea someone told me about:

http://www.pavingexpert.com/aco01b.htm

Now this site is foreign, england I think, but the idea is still the same. In my area a garage floor drain is NOT ilegal, just very expensive. Something like $1500 or more for new construction. If you put this trough thing in the driveway right where it meets the garage door it should work. the garage floor is sloped so water will go out towards the drain. Only thing I don't know is if it would freeze in the cold Chicago area winters
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Old 01-02-2006, 08:36 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Fermani
Tony - How is you floor setup to catch the water? It it pitched to catch it at a drain or grate? Was this system installed before or after the floor was poured? I'm planning on building a garage to detail cars out of and I'm wondering what people are doing for drainage. Most cities won't allow drains in garages in residential areas.

I installed before the floor was poured....3-car garage, and the floor gradually slopes to the drain....drain is a pvc drain to the foundation wall on garage.

I live in the country and also have a 75000 BTU ceiling mount furnace that uses propane....
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Old 01-04-2006, 11:38 AM   #15
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When I built my garage and put in floor drains, one concern I had was if the place was to sell and the drains didn't meet some stupid code, then what? I called the county and had a meeting with the code officer and he said to put the drain into a holding tank and run it to a leach field or into present septic system, this would meet state code even if there was a little oil or some other substance in with the water. (Because of the holding tank)You can then have the holding tank pumped if there are any problems and it meets all local and state codes. Not real expensive to do and all worrys are gone. Don't know about everyones local code, but it works in New York State and we seem to be one of the hardest states to do ANYTHING in.
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Old 01-04-2006, 07:07 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwpower
Easiest way to get around code for drains is to install drain system before pouring the floor, stuff the drain with newspaper, then pour a thin layer of concrete over the drain area. When the final inspection is complete, break away the concrete from the drain.
yup..thats what my buddy did.
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Old 01-05-2006, 10:02 AM   #17
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If freezing is your main problem, you might want to run a heating cable through the pipe. You can get them online or through a greenhouse supply co. Heck, Home Depot might even have them. Plug it in while your washing cars so the water doesn't freeze at the other end of the pipe and unplug when you're through. Might be easier than digging the well.

John
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Old 01-05-2006, 09:03 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwpower
Easiest way to get around code for drains is to install drain system before pouring the floor, stuff the drain with newspaper, then pour a thin layer of concrete over the drain area. When the final inspection is complete, break away the concrete from the drain.

How do you explain the slope to the "covered up" drain to the inspector. Here no drain is allowed unless you have a gas and oil seperator. It can not be run out to the yard like the gutters.
What my concrete guy suggested was, put in a channel drain, but run the drain pipe to a sump basin in the garage floor. He calls this a contained drain. Inspector thinks it's to catch snow run off. When washing cars, just drop a small sump pump in and drain outside when full. "No harm--No foul"
What do you think about this idea???
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Old 01-05-2006, 09:22 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donzi4me
How do you explain the slope to the "covered up" drain to the inspector. Here no drain is allowed unless you have a gas and oil seperator. It can not be run out to the yard like the gutters.
What my concrete guy suggested was, put in a channel drain, but run the drain pipe to a sump basin in the garage floor. He calls this a contained drain. Inspector thinks it's to catch snow run off. When washing cars, just drop a small sump pump in and drain outside when full. "No harm--No foul"
What do you think about this idea???
Not sure, but I would think you could get away with making a gentle slope.

Draining the sump everytime you use the water would be a pain in the butt.
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Old 01-06-2006, 01:37 PM   #20
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Luckily, My home's garage floor was "funnelled" into the center where there is a floor drain, then PVC piping under the slab, through the foundation wall into a pit filled with gravel (no landscaping cloth though , I'd imagine). I've washed my cars in there before. If I get too carried away with water the drain will back up a little but it will gradually go away.

I thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread when I first saw it. Then realized it wasn't too conducive to woodworking with the floor unlevel. My detached garage for the woodworking is completely flat, no drain, no slope etc.

Jeremy
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