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Old 01-13-2006, 06:33 PM   #1
DynoDave
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Default Running natural gas to a garage

Hey guys. Just wondering if anyone ran their own gas pipe to their shop. I don't know what's involved. Black iron was always the standard when I was helping my Dad, but a friend at work said a lot of that is done with rolls of plastic today. My application will be a run from the house, across the yard, to a detached garage. Any thoughts?
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Old 01-13-2006, 07:50 PM   #2
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Hey Dave hows it going.
To answer your question when I did mine I ran soft copper, flaired it on both ends and put a fitting that changes it over to black pipe. Of course I don't have it done inside the garage yet but I have a 3 day weekend to get it done along with installing the heater.
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Old 01-13-2006, 08:11 PM   #3
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in most places you have to run black pipe to meet code. plastic is used underground.
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Old 01-13-2006, 08:29 PM   #4
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Dave,
If the run is less than 50' I think copper wouldlbe the way to go. it's difficult to get copper in legnths over 50'. I had a 130' run so I used 1" plastic.

Gary.
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Old 01-13-2006, 09:38 PM   #5
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Plastic for the underground and either black iron or type "L" or "K" copper for the rest would be fine. Do not connect copper directly to black iron.
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Old 01-13-2006, 09:56 PM   #6
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I used black pipe for propane line (90 ft) and thread-sealed it with yellow teflon tape. The you wrap the outside of the fittings with some vynil tape. Our county codes say 18" deep

I'd stay away from plastic or copper, one good shovel strike and you've got a leak.

after you connect the whole thing, check for pressure (15 lbs) for 24 hrs. It will vary with temps but should not loose any.

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Old 01-14-2006, 09:25 AM   #7
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My last garage had Plastic pipe with steal risers, the local gas co-op had built it. but it was underground. It is my understanding that if you use black pipe undergound it must have welded connections not threaded. threre is also a fleaxxable steel line called "Gastite" (they have a website" that is run in new house construction, but I dont know if it can used outside. I just finished my garage furnace in my new house, and I bought black pipe and rented a threader and cutter and did all my own for Natual gas.ut none of it was under ground.

remeber if you do have a riser comming out of the ground that will have cement around it, you should put a plastic colloar around the riser so the cement cant put any weight on your line if it shifts
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Old 01-15-2006, 07:08 AM   #8
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Hey Dr. Bill! Didn't know you were hanging around here now. Is this some of Jonís handwork? LOL
Copper sure sounds a LOT easier to work with than iron. Is your run over 50 feet? Chrgdrt (posted below yours) mentioned it's difficult to get copper over 50 feet in length.

Jason...I'll be running a fair distance underground. Say 30 feet if I build in one location, or a 70 feet if I build in another.

Chrgdrt...that's what I was thinking. Ease of install around bends, and just unrolling into a trench sounds pretty good to me! Just wasn't sure about code in Michigan for depth, or material type.

Fireman, thatís what I'm hoping to do.

Reflexx...I can appreciate (& share) your concern about durability. I could see copper getting damaged by a hand shovel. The plastic I've had described to locally sounds plenty tough to withstand it.

Spud...I'm not really familiar with gas pipe at all. What are risers? Are you saying they ran plastic underground, and then teed in iron when ever it was coming up to the surface? It's funny you mentioned that the co-op do the work, as I was wondering if I would have to hire the local gas company here (Consumers Energy) to do the work. I hope not. After a horrendous experience working with our local electric provider 2 years ago, I very much believe that the LESS interaction I have with a large utility the better off I am.

Thanks to everyone for replying so far. Any other thoughts? Sounds like the next step is to find out if there are any local code restrictions about trench depth, and pipe type.
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Old 01-15-2006, 08:57 AM   #9
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I strongly suggest you get a gas contractor or your local gas supplier to run your line.
This is for liability reasons. If you should happen to have a leak and a fire your home owners insurance will not cover the damage if they find you did the work.
If you run the line yourself you need to check with your supplier to see what type system you have ,ie 1/2 pound or higher pressure. Thiss make a differance as to pipe sixe and regulators to use.
There is a specific type of plastic pipe used for underground gas make sure you use that.
There is also a flex type, ribbed metal covered with a yellow sheath. It is used above ground and in walls etc.
If you do the work yourself have it inspected, then God forbid there is a problem you will be covered by your insurance.
Check your local building codes and with your inspector.
I work with natural and propane gas fireplaces, hope this helps
Bill.
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Old 01-15-2006, 09:21 AM   #10
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FYI.....Virtually ALL underground gas pipe used in North America today is plastic....I'm in and out of those pipe yards every month....I haul miles of it going to gas and pipeline companies in the south and midwest.
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Old 01-15-2006, 09:36 AM   #11
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My plumber used CSST (corrugated stainess steel tubing) with the yellow jacket inside a PVC sleeve. My run is quite curved, which would have meant more joints with black pipe (potentially more leaks).

Black pipe was used before the line exited the home as well as once the CSST entered the garage.
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Old 01-15-2006, 11:47 AM   #12
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Well Dave I just kind of wander over here.
I ran my gas line in the same trench as my electric lines. They are in seperate plastic conduits roughly 24" down(depth of the trencher I rented). If I remember electric line only need to be 18". I think in total because of the 90į bend to get to the garage it's 37' plus what ever it going down and coming back up the trench. Well with in what you can buy. One thing I did learn is that 1/2" copper and 1/2" black pipe are not the same inside diameter. Copper being 0.500 and pipe being 0.622. So if you have a long run and a large furnace you might have to step up to a larger size pipe for the underground run.
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Old 01-15-2006, 05:47 PM   #13
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