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Old 06-20-2009, 08:44 PM   #1
babzog
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Default Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

Hey folks,

I'm envisioning a lean-top at the back of my shop to house the garden/yard equipment (therefore, getting it out of my shop) and am curious about the best way to tie it in to the existing structure. The shop is clad in your standard vinyl siding.

Construction-wise, I am thinking of building it starting with floating piers/deck blocks with 3/4" crushed stone as a base/floor. Would I run into problems with a floating design that's attached to a more permanent structure?
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Old 06-20-2009, 11:32 PM   #2
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

Hi, as far as attaching the roof of your lean-to, you would need to remove the siding, attach a ledger to the existing stud wall and flash that junction when you apply your roofing material. The piers you mention need to perform 2 functions...first they need to be able to spread the weight of the structure out over an area sufficient to bear the load without the soil sinking, i.e. If you are on ledge, you pretty much have all kinds of support, if you're in a swamp, you need more square footage in your piers to distribute the weight. Secondly, the piers need to be below the frost line if frost is a reality in your location. If they aren't they will heave with the freezing of the ground and your main structure will be stable, that will cause shifting of your lean-to.

Sounds like your plan for the floor will be fine, the more stone the better as far as stability.

Another thing you may want to try is to skirt the bottom of your lean-to with Durock or Wonderboard cement panels. You can attach them to your frame walls and let them go down into the ground like a skirt. The stuff is impervious to moisture and bugs and it looks like concrete (because it is) I have even gone so far as to tape the joints with fiberglass joint tape and then parge the entire surface of the panels with a mixture of thinset mortar mixed with enough sand so that you can trowel it on without it being all sticky. My oldest example of this approach is about 18 years old now with no failure

Hope this helps
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Old 06-21-2009, 02:26 AM   #3
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

Hi,

Thank you and yes, that does give me some excellent info. One thing I've been wondering, is how to seal the ends of a ledger board to the existing structure/siding. Just caulk it?

If I require concrete piers below the frost line (that day with the power auger is going to be a picnic - massive amounts of tree roots in the area), would I be able to just get away with two piers (for the outermost wall/beam, ala "car port" style), or would I require two inner piers as well (to support the side walls at the wall/existing structure junction)? I'm curious if I can get away with cutting/stripping the siding from the existing structure and simply attaching the shed walls directly to the structure and the outer posts.

Thanks again!
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Old 06-21-2009, 02:27 PM   #4
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

Can you just go through the sideing?
Sure, but it won't be as strong and you will have a harder time finding the studs to attach the ledger board to.
And you do have to find the studs. It is a good bet your sheathing is just Celotex, and it is not structual.
How big a roof are you thinking of?
What kind of pitch?
What kind of snow load will ther be?

As far as looks goes, put your end rafters right at the end of your ledger board and then a covering peice of trim outside it to hide the joint.
Bring the trim down to cover the joint where your eave beam sits on the corner post as well.
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Old 06-21-2009, 10:19 PM   #5
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

KBS your advice is right on. The building should be stripped (easy with vinyl) and the new structure attached to the old one by fastening the roof ledger to the frame.

You may be able to just support the structure at the corners on the piers but that would depend on how big that wall actually is. I am going to assume that you will pull a building permit for this project. They will require sketches of what you plan to do. If what you are proposing won't fly, the building dept will let you know in a hurry, probably point out the deficiencies and steer you in the right direction.
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Old 06-22-2009, 11:36 AM   #6
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

Is there any issues with typing in the lean to using the garage wall as the main support? You might just run support columns up alongside the garage wall that would hold up the beam, then you simply need to keep the lean-to attached to the garage so it does not pull away. I agree tying in to the wall as load bearinig is more permanent, but you may have permit or zoning issues. By free standing and just being tied together for rain tight, you avoid a lot of potential trouble if it applies.

I would suggest to pour a cement floor. yes it is more costly and more work, but it is cleaner and you can roll items on it much easier than loose flooring
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Old 06-23-2009, 12:41 PM   #7
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

Hey guys,

Thanks for the replies. I've already sent a note off to my local building dept to inquire about permit requirements for this project. It's still in the planning stages, but I'm thinking a lean-to about 8x10 (or maybe 8x12).

The snow load can be high here so while I might be able to build a wider add-on with a lower roof pitch, a narrower one (ie: 6 x ...) with a higher pitch might make more sense (I can get a bit more height at the back of the existing shop but it's less convenient to access and will require more clearing). If I build on the side of the shop (my preference), the inside roof height will be about 7' at the shop side and probably 5' at the outward side... which isn't much of a slope. I could tie into the existing roof to gain lots of height but then we start to talk real plans, money, etc. Like I said, this is the "discussion phase" so all ideas are welcome!

As far as tieing into the structure, I can easily strip the vinyl away and expose the OSB sheathing. Still curious though, if I'd need something at the junctions of the existing shop wall/lean-to front and back walls for support. I attached a rough sketch of what I'm proposing.

Regarding siding.. I'm thinking board/batten for the lean-to... I love that look. As far as the inside corner where the board/batten siding would meet the vinyl, would I just install some J trim on the vinyl side (right up to the top of the roof where the ledger sits) and then caulk that entire joint where the J trim abuts the wood (kinda like the edge of a window)?

I'd love a concrete floor, but I think the 3/4" stone will be fine - it's just to park the lawn tractor, lawnmowers, shovels and rakes, etc (and I gotta cut costs in some areas if I want to do other things like upgrade the lighting in my garage).

Thanks again!


lean-to sketch.jpg

Last edited by babzog; 06-23-2009 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 06-23-2009, 04:15 PM   #8
1950ChevySuburban
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

What if you separated the two by, say, 8" and had a place to stack or hide metal, pipe, etc....?
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Old 06-23-2009, 09:19 PM   #9
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Default Re: Tying Lean-to onto Existing Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1950ChevySuburban View Post
What if you separated the two by, say, 8" and had a place to stack or hide metal, pipe, etc....?
Hey Chevy,

You're on my brainwave. The more I consider this, the more I'm thinking this is realistically going one of two ways:

Either a fully detached, standalone shed, which I might combine with my "also" project, that being a storage cover for firewood and rough-sawn lumber, or

An attached shed, fully tied into the existing roof with a new peak at 90deg to the original. That will make it easy to run electrical for a light and a couple of plugs and save some costs due to not having to build a fourth wall.
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