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Old 04-15-2013, 11:32 PM   #6721
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Great progress on all fronts. Landscaping is a joy for me and a green thumb is not necessary, because, if it was, I'd be out of luck!

In looking at the seat restoration, I was shocked to see the level of rust on the seat frames for my 356 project. I'll have more on that aspect posted in my thread a little later on.

Just a note to say that I thoroughly enjoy my time reading about all that happens at your home/shop/garage.

Best,

Ody.
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Old 04-15-2013, 11:33 PM   #6722
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

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Very nice work indeed
Hello there Ted and thank you for the kind words. I see you are from Bakersfield. Take a close look...



...at the LP vinyl record album covers hanging on the wall over my desk. Also note the triangle shaped trophy sitting on the back of the Pepsi machine.



The circled LP album cover is titled Bakersfield '64 which a recording of the 1964 Fuel and Gas Championships drag race meet held in..........Bakersfield, California. Yes, it's just a recording of the sounds of the cars and dragsters at the drag strip as they ran down the track. A friend of mine happened to spot that album cover hanging on the wall while he was at the shop a couple of years ago. That in turn leads us to the odd shaped trophy which...



...upon closer inspection...



... happens to be a Championship trophy from the 1965 Fuel and Gas Championships meet held at Bakersfield and won by my buddy...



...Norm Cowdrey seen here last year, 2012, in his vintage CanAm McKee Mk 10 Wedge. He won the Bakersfield trophy in 1965 driving an Austin-Healey 3000 with a supercharged small block Chevy, running in class AAM/SP he turned an ET: 8.575 at, MPH: 161.87 to win. When he saw the album cover he asked me if I wanted his trophy which he thought would look nice displayed with the album cover. As you can see Ted, Philo truly is The Center of The Universe.

Thomas
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Old 04-16-2013, 12:42 AM   #6723
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

The grass is always greener at the Center of the Universe! lol
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Old 04-16-2013, 06:17 AM   #6724
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Nice work on the seat refurb.
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:19 AM   #6725
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Thank you Jim. If you're going to do specific mid-year Corvette seats I can send you a link for a more detailed post I did on that project on another forum.

Haven't forgotten about the wood shop pictures either.

Thomas
Thanks Thomas. No hurry on the wood shop pictures. Everyone is busy, particularly now, as the weather gets better. I know you'll get to it when you get to it. I"m guessing that when you started this thread, you had no idea your projects/machinery/cars/etc. would become a regularly counted upon source of entertainment and inspiration for so many of us, or that you'd be taking "content requests." I've certainly enjoyed the journey thus far and appreciate the efforts you've made to include, and indulge us, when possible. Consequently, you'll receive no pressure from me to post content, wood working or otherwise, until you have the time and desire to do so. I look forward to the next "episode" in your adventures at the Center of the Universe, regardless of what they me be.

Jim C.
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:35 AM   #6726
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Thomas,
Are you a member of the National Corvette Restorers Society? That seat story would be great in the membership publication The Corvette Restorer. I know a lot of the members would welcome it. Via PM I can make all the connections you need to get that done, if you wish.

Remember Hans Norberg!

Terry
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Old 04-16-2013, 01:41 PM   #6727
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Thomas,

again thanks for all the inspiration you are giving me, almost every day I see another item in your garage and I think hmmm I like that, I want that
I have a question, is that a (Original) Milton driveway bell above the man door?

IMG_3368_zps28eab9c8.jpg

I'm thinking of installing one myself.

Hugo.
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Old 04-16-2013, 03:24 PM   #6728
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Those were The good old Days of the Smokers Meets in Bako.. back then, I was building AA/Gas super charged cars, like SW/C, JR. Thompson, MGM/C&O Austin pickup, Hamburger & Mustard's 33 Willy, etc. etc. Great times Still love your shop ...
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:18 PM   #6729
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

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Great progress on all fronts. Landscaping is a joy for me and a green thumb is not necessary, because, if it was, I'd be out of luck!

In looking at the seat restoration, I was shocked to see the level of rust on the seat frames for my 356 project. I'll have more on that aspect posted in my thread a little later on.

Just a note to say that I thoroughly enjoy my time reading about all that happens at your home/shop/garage.

Best,

Ody.
Thanks Ody for checking in. I've been following your impressive exploits when I can. I'm not surprised your 356 seat frame was rusted. It's a fate that befalls most convertible cars, an occupational hazard if you will. I am looking forward to the day I can join your ranks of those retired. When I do, I am planning on going on a "Great Garage Tour". Chris and I want to visit as many folks as we can from this thread who don't mind us visiting. Even those in Australia and New Zealand (is Sick Puppy even still around??) Love all your pictures and great sense of humor! What, me worry.

Thomas
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:26 PM   #6730
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

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Thomas,
Are you a member of the National Corvette Restorers Society? That seat story would be great in the membership publication The Corvette Restorer. I know a lot of the members would welcome it. Via PM I can make all the connections you need to get that done, if you wish.

Remember Hans Norberg!

Terry
Interesting you bring the NCRS up Terry. I have been meaning to join for a while so go ahead and send the appropriate material via PM and I'll get going on that.

Hans was one of kind wasn't he? A great loss to the LCOC and his friends alike.

Thomas
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:31 PM   #6731
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

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Thomas,

again thanks for all the inspiration you are giving me, almost every day I see another item in your garage and I think hmmm I like that, I want that
I have a question, is that a (Original) Milton driveway bell above the man door?

Attachment 251197

I'm thinking of installing one myself.

Hugo.
Hugo, from reading your thread, your workmanship is second to none. Clearly you are enjoining the process as much as I am. That's at least half the fun isn't it?

I did briefly mention the driveway bell...



...many, many posts ago but here is some additional information on it. As you know, over the years there have been several manufacturers of driveway bells, with Milton arguably the best known. In fact they are still being made and you can buy a brand new one for around $50 on Amazon no less. But I wanted a vintage driveway bell which I felt was more fitting to the shop and one that was a little unusual. Note the copper "L" fitting through the wall and the clear tube....now hold that thought.



This one is not a Milton and I'm not sure who did make it. There was no information on the unit itself, just the embossed "L" on the lower bell case. I've seen a few others like like it, but not many. I did find a date on the back before it was restored, 1962, so that's my guess when it was made. I have zero pictures of it before or during restoration. That was done long before I realized there was some interest in such things. Who knew? It was disassembled, cleaned, painted (again, long before I knew about Rick and his powder coating skills) and I had the bell and attachment acorn nut re-chromed. Milton bells just ring twice with a ding, ding. This one will ring the bell continuously as long as the points under the black dome are in contact with each other. So if someone parks...




..right on top of the air line stretched across the driveway the bell will continue to ring until the air in the line equalizes and the bellows under the dome relaxes and the points are no longer in contact with each other. That takes about 30 seconds, I made sure there were no air leaks in the various lines.



The air goes through the flexible line to this hard line. I used galvanized pipe since it's rugged and not easily damaged, that I additionally painted on top of the existing galvanizing with special galvanize paint to double ensure against it rusting very soon. That's a pet peeve of mine. Rust streaking down unprotected metal, but I digress. I also used clear plastic sleeves under the pipe clamps to prevent the clamps from scratching the paint and galvanizing. Air travels up the pipe into the carport attic space to copper pipe, again non-corrosive material, through to the "L" fitting on the wall inside the shop (remember your mental picture from earlier?) to the clear plastic tube and then to the diaphragm/bellows under the dome. I didn't use plastic pipe anywhere because of concerns it would become brittle with age and, well, frankly...... I find it ugly. The unit needs electrical 110V power so I installed an outlet above the door...




...which you can just barely see from the side. Note how the unit is designed to be raised above the wall surface...



...so I can hide the outlet under there and by using a flat plug, it makes for a very clean installation as viewed...



..from the floor with no cumbersome electrical cord showing. I would highly encourage you to install a driveway bell Hugo. They are PNC to boot. Oh, that's Practical, Nostalgic and relatively Cheap!

Thomas
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:59 AM   #6732
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop



The circled LP album cover is titled Bakersfield '64 which a recording of the 1964 Fuel and Gas Championships drag race meet held in..........Bakersfield, California. Yes, it's just a recording of the sounds of the cars and dragsters at the drag strip as they ran down the track. A friend of mine happened to spot that album cover hanging on the wall while he was at the shop a couple of years ago. That in turn leads us to the odd shaped trophy which...


Was a senior in high school and traveled down with 3 buddies from the small town we lived in for the 1964 Fuel and Gas Championships. Great times.
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:15 AM   #6733
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The circled LP album cover is titled Bakersfield '64 which a recording of the 1964 Fuel and Gas Championships drag race meet held in..........Bakersfield, California.......


Was a senior in high school and traveled down with 3 buddies from the small town we lived in for the 1964 Fuel and Gas Championships. Great times.

Growing up in the mid west in the 1960's we'd read Car Craft, Hot Rod or what have you and see all the neat things happening out in California. All the fabulous street cars, hot rods, dragsters, multiple drag strips, the weather, surfing, bikini girls and all of it. It was like a dream to us here. The standard of living was much more modest here so all we could do was try to visualize what is must be like actually living out there. Every so often a buddy would move out there or do a summer visiting relatives and report back to us what we were missing. To say we were envious would be a gross understatement.

I can only imagine what is must have been like to see those races and all the legendary cars and drivers back then. Great times indeed!

Thanks Hemihead2!

Thomas
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Old 04-20-2013, 09:34 AM   #6734
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The only sad part of the weekend at that Smokers meet was when the Alcohol and Beverage Control folks (no longer in existence) caught us minors with some beers in the parking lot between rounds, made us pour them out and left, telling us to "have a good time". Today, we'd have been hustled off to jail. The races were still great.
Somewhere, I still have my pit pass from that meet with the picture of the previous year's top time winner, Art Malone.
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Old 04-22-2013, 09:30 PM   #6735
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Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Here then are a few more details about the fan...



...when you get a close look you can see...



..the finish is original and nice, but it does have patina.



It's a 3 speed, osulating GE fan, manufactured in 1941...





The speed that it osulates can also be varied. That's done by unscrewing the pivot arm on the bottom and changing the pivot points.



Note the replacement period cloth insulated power cord.



Just a wonderful piece that fits right into the shop and is highly functional as well, the best of both worlds.

Thomas

Last edited by BB767; 04-22-2013 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 04-22-2013, 09:57 PM   #6736
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I have the younger brother (or maybe the son) of your fan - I don't know the exact age but I imagine it's late 1950s, light grey in color, with a 16" blade. Very quiet and moves a lot of air. http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s....php?p=2075472

The fan blades are shaped differently but you can see they used the same oscillating mechanism and base design for quite a while.
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Old 04-22-2013, 10:20 PM   #6737
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I have the younger brother (or maybe the son) of your fan - I don't know the exact age but I imagine it's late 1950s, light grey in color, with a 16" blade. Very quiet and moves a lot of air. http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s....php?p=2075472

The fan blades are shaped differently but you can see they used the same oscillating mechanism and base design for quite a while.
It is certainly in the same family Stuart, no question. Mine, like yours, also moves a bunch of air which is a real plus in a fan. Ya know, if you have something that works and works well, why change it?

Thanks for sharing that. I hadn't even seen that thread on shop fans before. Chris tells me I need to get out more and she may be right.

I'm just about done with a fairly significant restoration/powder coat project. I'm thiiiiiis close to finishing it so I've been spending some major time on it trying to get it done. I thought today would do it, but I had to attend to some small details on it that took several hours to finish. Glad I did though, it's turning out swell. Watch this space.

Thomas
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Old 04-24-2013, 05:43 PM   #6738
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Here's a Corvette project I've recently finished that has been detailed on another forum but I'll share some highlights here. There is some material that has greater application than just servicing a seat for a Corvette.

The drivers seat didn't move and wouldn't stay latched in position to my satisfaction so I decided this winter to solve the problem. I doubted that it had any service work in the last 45+ years so to begin...



...I removed all the upholstery to leave the bare seat frame. The factory never puts much paint on areas like this which are unseen. In time that paint will break down and the exposed metal will begin to rust. It's worse in a convertible car which at times can get caught in the rain with the top down which will soak the carpet and create a very humid environment for the seat metal. Here is the seat frame is viewed upside down.



The seat latch mechanism (there are 2, one on each side) and seat tracks were all gummed up with decades old dirt and dried out grease.



Additionally there were broken parts like these seat bushing springs and latch return springs that were distorted so they wouldn't put proper tension on the latches.



Some of the problems with the seat not latching properly are due to the return springs not putting proper tension on the latches (circled yellow) and the seat notches themselves (circled blue) which had a build up of old grease and debris keeping the lever from fully engaging the track notch. Cleaning and lubricating would help but there is more to it than just that.



A bit of a surprise was finding how poor quality the factory spot welds were and that most were either cracked or broken.



Here is one side of the seat frame with all those spot welds repaired. Once this was all done the seat frame was remarkably more rigid and stronger.



The metal is thin so if you're going to MIG weld use the lowest setting and just use a momentary spot. Better still is TIG welding (results seen here) which gives greater control and localized heat to minimize warping the frame.



There were also a couple of tapped screw holes that were stripped so they were filled, drilled and then...



...re-tapped as seen.



Both latch levers had some wear. That notch was worn into this lever, it shouldn't even be there. So a piece of aluminum was used on the backside of the notch to back up the notch and it was then TIG filled with metal. The new metal won't attach to the aluminum as this was done.



After the new metal filled in the notch, it was reground and filed to shape. Both of the latches were thus repaired.



With all those repairs done, all the various parts were prepared for new paint by removing the old paint and rust...





...and then painted. This was done in the winter so I used the heat from my house boiler (seen in the background) to help dry the paint. Powder coating might have caused some clearance problems with the moving parts plus I didn't really need the durability of powder coating. Priming and painting will be plenty durable enough in this application.

This is the end of Part 1. To be continued.

Thomas
what is the type of boiler? Wood? Gas? Oil?
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Old 04-25-2013, 06:02 AM   #6739
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Natural gas.
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Old 04-25-2013, 11:03 PM   #6740
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what is the type of boiler? Wood? Gas? Oil?
The boiler was installed in 1952 (61 years ago!) and was originally oil fired. Natural gas came to Philo in 1963 and that's when it was converted to natural gas. My heating guy tells me as well built as that furnace is it should last another 61 years....easy.

Thomas
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