Welcome to the The Garage Journal Board forums.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   The Garage Journal Board > The Garage > Garage Gallery

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-11-2010, 06:49 AM   #1241
jgbrueck
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 13
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Thanks for the pictures Thomas!!

I verified last night, and indeed, I also have a "G924" stamped into the base of the hydraulic cylinder. All the pictures you posted look identical to my jack, so I must be on the right track.

One other pesky question, while I have your ear... My sheet-metal handle is cracked in several places - does everyone have advice on the best way to repair that? Also, how to remove the handle from the jack? I can remove the 2 mounting screws, but the handle still only slides up so far of the pivot mechanism; it won't come off fully. I must be missing something...

Thanks!

Jeff
jgbrueck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 09:59 AM   #1242
BB767
Senior Member
 
BB767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Near Champaign, IL
Posts: 2,705
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Note to everyone. On post 1235 (misc jack pictures) I edited the post to use the correct terminology of staked screws and not swaged screws. I reread the post this morning and hope I caught that error before I confused some poor unsuspecting soul! My bad. That's what I get for trying to post something right after getting home from 15 days on the road and flying home over 6,000 (9,650 Km) miles with very little sleep!

A trying to be correct, Thomas
BB767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 06-11-2010, 10:37 AM   #1243
USMCBay
Senior Member
 
USMCBay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Heritage Park - Friendswood, TX
Posts: 352
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

One of the COOLEST POSTS I've ever seen... WOW... and how~!!!!
__________________
2003 Road King - 211Cam - Titanium P-rods - Hi-Comp Springs - AttitudeCustomPaint - 1.5" dropped rear - V&H FuelPak / StraightShooters - USMC
USMCBay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 10:47 AM   #1244
thomask
Senior Member
 
thomask's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sunshine State
Posts: 354
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

I still enjoy being amazed at your finds.

You should get a visit from "American Pickers".

Thanks for your continued sharing and pictures.
__________________
She said, "These tools look like you are doing surgery"
And I said, "What's your point?"
thomask is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 06:35 PM   #1245
BB767
Senior Member
 
BB767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Near Champaign, IL
Posts: 2,705
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgbrueck View Post
Thanks for the pictures Thomas!!

I verified last night, and indeed, I also have a "G924" stamped into the base of the hydraulic cylinder. All the pictures you posted look identical to my jack, so I must be on the right track.

One other pesky question, while I have your ear... My sheet-metal handle is cracked in several places - does everyone have advice on the best way to repair that? Also, how to remove the handle from the jack? I can remove the 2 mounting screws, but the handle still only slides up so far of the pivot mechanism; it won't come off fully. I must be missing something...

Thanks!

Jeff

Jeff to remove the handle what you're missing is........



.....a small roll pin that secures the release knob to the inner mechanisms. You can see it here below the larger sliding safety pin, 7 o'clock to it.



Here's a look at it on my other jack, it's that small indentation. It becomes full on "stuff" over the years and sometimes gets painted over so it is hard to locate. That's the original factory red paint and it's painted right over the roll pin so no surprise it is difficult to see. Once you know it's there and where to locate it, it's easy.



On the opposite side from it is a smaller hole, about haft the size of this one. That's to allow you to use a small pin punch to drive it out.

As for the handle sheet metal cracks........





.... rest assured you're not the only one.



These are repairable. The best way........ someone out there please make a suggestion. Braze it perhaps? I have a friend who is a genius at metal work and I just haven't discussed it with him as yet. If no one posts any thoughts on repairing it, I'll let you know what I find out next week when I see him. He can do anything with metal.

BTW, he's the guy who made the counter weight for the lift that was cut off.



See page 18, post # 348 on this. Repairing those cracks shouldn't be difficult after fabricating this.

Fortunately the original paint jack is in perfect condition so all I have to do is continue cleaning it.

From all you're telling me it looks like you have a very early Walker #784, 4 ton, Big Boy from the Walker Greyhound series circa mid to late 1930's. Nice score that! Hiball can get it operating in first class condition and might have some of those miscellaneous parts you're missing....except that nose piece. Those are hard ,but not impossible to find.

Keep us informed to your progress and thanks for sharing.

Thomas
BB767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 06:40 PM   #1246
BB767
Senior Member
 
BB767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Near Champaign, IL
Posts: 2,705
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by USMCBay View Post
One of the COOLEST POSTS I've ever seen... WOW... and how~!!!!

You make me blush..........


BTW,thank you for your service to our country!

Thomas
BB767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 06:51 PM   #1247
BB767
Senior Member
 
BB767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Near Champaign, IL
Posts: 2,705
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by thomask View Post
I still enjoy being amazed at your finds.

You should get a visit from "American Pickers".

Thanks for your continued sharing and pictures.
I don't watch TV but I've heard about "American Pickers" sounds fascinating. Glad I beat them to the property!

I've got some more "day 1" pictures plus some from the 50's and '60's but I just haven't had time to organize, scan, resize and post. With the weather being so good now and racing season upon us, they're here lurking and leering at me waiting! Not to spill the beans but I hope to be able to post a link to You Tube regarding video from there, transferred from 8 mm film. Not promising anything but I'm working on it. I'm not done yet! More is in the works.......

Thomas
BB767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 07:14 PM   #1248
Fueler
Senior Member
 
Fueler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Urbana, IL
Posts: 642
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

I can tig weld that handle if you don't find another way and I don't mean a cosmetic weld. The crack has to be grooved out and filled back in so that all new metal is created.
__________________
Dave Koehler - Koehler Injection
Fuel Injection - Nitrous Charger - Nitrous Master software - Balancing
"Never let a race car know that you are in a hurry."
Fueler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 05:02 AM   #1249
Bigpigdave
Senior Member
 
Bigpigdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Camden, IN
Posts: 320
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

I would recommend either Tig welding or Brazing the sheet metal. The area around the crack would have to be cleaned thoroughly and the crack grooved, should be an easy repair.

Thanks for all the great posts, I love these old floor jacks.

Dave
__________________
"Smokey Yunick was the Da Vinci of the 20th century"
Bigpigdave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 07:01 PM   #1250
BB767
Senior Member
 
BB767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Near Champaign, IL
Posts: 2,705
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fueler View Post
I can tig weld that handle if you don't find another way and I don't mean a cosmetic weld. The crack has to be grooved out and filled back in so that all new metal is created.
Hi Dave and thank you for the offer. Should I need you I'll let you know. It's nice having multiple repair options!

Since you're just "up the road" from the shop, stop in sometime and we'll swap Crazy Charlie stories.

Thomas
BB767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 01:32 AM   #1251
CRTDI
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,017
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

[QUOTE

Thanks for all the great posts, I love these old floor jacks.

Dave[/QUOTE]



Some more old jacks here:

http://garagejournal.com/forum/showt...ght=show+jacks
CRTDI is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 06:54 PM   #1252
BB767
Senior Member
 
BB767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Near Champaign, IL
Posts: 2,705
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by CRTDI View Post
[QUOTE

Thanks for all the great posts, I love these old floor jacks.

Dave


Some more old jacks here:

http://garagejournal.com/forum/showt...ght=show+jacks[/QUOTE]


Dave, I'm back home again and thank you for the link. I rarely have time to look at other posts. I've got my hands full with flying, racing and work out at the "ranch"! Fortunately Chris does bring interesting threads to my attention from time to time. That Blackhawk SJ-18 of yours is stunning!

Garage Journal members....Saving old jacks, tools and other "stuff" one at a time!!

Thomas
BB767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 04:09 AM   #1253
CRTDI
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,017
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Like you with your Walker units, I just like looking at that SJ-18. It's really hard to think of it as a useful tool, it's more like art work to me.

Being a long frame jack, I expected it to be a bit heavy, but suprisingly discovered that the cast frame is aluminum. Maybe it's a forerunner to the modern aluminum "racing" jack.
CRTDI is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 12:57 PM   #1254
Omphaloskeptic
Senior Member
 
Omphaloskeptic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Ultima Ratio, Wa.
Posts: 2,346
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Okay Thomas, here's one more guy prostrating himself, awed by the "Herculean Task" you and your family have taken on (and are definitely winning)!
I was sitting on the couch the other day, trying to find the energy to do SOMETHING with the mess in my SHOP/apt building I recently purchased and moved into, and I thought why not visit GJ for some inspiration. Well, I haven't visited here for quite a while and saw this thread with 280k visitors, so I thought it just might be worth a peek. Well, here I sit days latter, vision blurred, butt numb, and my mind blown away!!! You Sir, are amazing; and an inspiration to all of us who seem overwhelmed by our meager projects. After reading all 60+ pages of this thread, I would ask "What were you thinking and what are you drinking?!" when you bought the Johnson place? Whatever it is that you are drinking, I want some! Congratulations to you for your accomplishment of such an awe-inspiring project(s). I would also like to nominate your dear wife for Sainthood (for obvious reasons)!LOL
Omphaloskeptic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 06:15 PM   #1255
markviii
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: east central IL
Posts: 1,025
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Omphaloskeptic - we're strictly milk, juice, and water (herbal tea for me) around here. We wouldn't get anything done otherwise! (we also don't take much time to sit around contemplating our navels - but we probably should try it sometime!) Only Thomas knows what he's thinking and whatever it is comes into being because he wants it to.

We both went into this purchase not knowing the extent of restoration and development that would eventually (and continually) take place. At the beginning, we didn't know if we could save the 1930s shop, but we're sure glad it turned out so well.

The fact that Thomas has a personal connection to the property and family was very important in going forward with this purchase/project. This has been a focal point and motivation for many of the projects that weren't anticipated (like jack and other equipment restoration and addition of the Morton building). Since it's going to be the location of our retirement home, we definitely wanted the buildings to meet our needs for the rest of our lives.

Glad we could contribute to others' motivation to work on their projects. Organizing all the pictures has helped us think in a more deliberate way about the entire project. The GJ has some incredibly versatile and talented members who have accomplished great things and also like helping others out on their projects.

Chris (markviii)

Last edited by markviii; 06-15-2010 at 06:21 PM.
markviii is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 09:45 PM   #1256
BB767
Senior Member
 
BB767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Near Champaign, IL
Posts: 2,705
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by Omphaloskeptic View Post
Okay Thomas, here's one more guy prostrating himself, awed by the "Herculean Task" you and your family have taken on (and are definitely winning)!
I was sitting on the couch the other day, trying to find the energy to do SOMETHING with the mess in my SHOP/apt building I recently purchased and moved into, and I thought why not visit GJ for some inspiration. Well, I haven't visited here for quite a while and saw this thread with 280k visitors, so I thought it just might be worth a peek. Well, here I sit days latter, vision blurred, butt numb, and my mind blown away!!! You Sir, are amazing; and an inspiration to all of us who seem overwhelmed by our meager projects. After reading all 60+ pages of this thread, I would ask "What were you thinking and what are you drinking?!" when you bought the Johnson place? Whatever it is that you are drinking, I want some! Congratulations to you for your accomplishment of such an awe-inspiring project(s). I would also like to nominate your dear wife for Sainthood (for obvious reasons)!LOL

Omphaloskeptic, first off you have one of the more interesting and definitely unusual user names. To save others from having to look the definition up it means roughly "navel gazing" or contemplating one's navel. We'll just leave it at that.

Your comments are very kind and witty as well. My thanks for taking a moment to wake from your stupor after reading all this, to express yourself here. My parents are partly to blame for all this. They brought me up with the idea that there was nothing I couldn't accomplish if I just put my mind to it and put the effort in. I've pretty well done that my whole life and darn'd if they weren't right! As I've stated here before, I'd been thinking about what I'd do if I could ever own that shop and sure enough I got the opportunity. I've been "living the dream" ever since. I didn't want to squander the opportunity.



As for the charming and always delightful Miss Chris, she has always been a terrific partner, if not always willing at first, in my.....well, unorthodox way of traveling through life. She is a saint to me.

Stay tune....

Thomas
BB767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2010, 02:00 PM   #1257
markviii
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: east central IL
Posts: 1,025
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Now I'm blushing!


Chris
markviii is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2010, 08:33 PM   #1258
Call me the Breeze
Senior Member
 
Call me the Breeze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ashville NY
Posts: 1,383
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

I have to say after reading this thread, it has inspired me to restore my old Walker Floor Jack. It is a Walker Hydraulic Roll-A-Car No. 782 Series A 2-ton jack. I got this about 18 years ago from a friend of mine who's grandfather passed away ( he owned an old service station in Fredonia NY ) and they wanted to get rid of it, plus a snap-on tire changer, and a Bear wheel balancer and hundreds of pounds of lead wheel weights for $50 bucks. I haven't used it much do to the fact it leaked all over the floor. After reading these posts I decided to tear it apart and see what was the problem. turned out it was just the packings needed tightened - silly me all these years of not using it. So while I had it apart, I decided to paint it up two tone maroon and almond. I still need to paint the side stripes and walker on the cast cover yet. It was originally a steel blue color but someone had painted the cast cover an ugly green. I know the colors I painted it isn't traditional, but I liked the combo. Does anyone know what year this is? did it have one of those cool nose piece cover on it originally? any information would be cool! Thanks, Breeze
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 064.jpg (141.4 KB, 197 views)
File Type: jpg 065.jpg (144.4 KB, 192 views)
File Type: jpg 067.jpg (141.1 KB, 270 views)
File Type: jpg 068.jpg (139.4 KB, 261 views)
Call me the Breeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2010, 08:42 PM   #1259
Call me the Breeze
Senior Member
 
Call me the Breeze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ashville NY
Posts: 1,383
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

Here is another project I restored. An old Milton ( at least I think it is , Well it is now anyways) Garage Bell ( ding ding when you drive over the hose ) Got this about a month ago from an old service station a friend of mine owned. the price was right - Free and it still works. Got it inside my garage... Dings when I pull the hot rod in and out.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 066.jpg (138.9 KB, 81 views)
Call me the Breeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2010, 08:58 PM   #1260
Call me the Breeze
Senior Member
 
Call me the Breeze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ashville NY
Posts: 1,383
Default Re: Restored 1930's Auto Shop

This is the next project I got for my Garage. I picked this up a week ago. It is a 1940's Wayne model 80 ( I believe) gas pump. It is in really good shape, very little rust , minor dents in it, complete including all the mechanicals (pump and motor) inside, not that I am pumping gas out of the ground with it. It is one heavy son of a gun though. Thinking of restoring as an ESSO pump. The handle still rolls the numbers to reset itself. I think it's pretty cool. I need to find another face like the one shown. the other side has a different wayne face from a different model pump that doesn't fit right. I also need to find one more of the contains lead signs for the other end. Thanks to everyone on here that makes this an awesome site. I learn alot, and have gotten some really great Ideas from here. - Breeze
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 069.jpg (138.8 KB, 96 views)
File Type: jpg 070.jpg (132.2 KB, 85 views)
Call me the Breeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:16 AM.