Welcome to the The Garage Journal Board forums.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   The Garage Journal Board > The Garage > Heating and A/C

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-03-2006, 02:06 PM   #1
bens
Member
 
bens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 56
Default Heating options in barn

What type of heating options do you suggest for a 42x75 pole barn (10' to 15' open ceilings). No gas, only electrical service at the site. No insulation in the barn. Concrete floor. One large sliding door (14'x14') and a smaller overhead door, neither of which are airtight.

I don't want to heat the barn all winter, but I'd like to be able to have something so it's a little more tolerable to work in. Perhaps just something to hang over the workbench or even a portable unit to move around.

Electricity would be easiest (maybe not the most efficient though) and I won't be running it but once or so a week. Is there anything affordable (few hundred dollars) that would make at least the workbench area tolerable during cold days?

I had something like this in mind, but I wonder if it would make a difference in such a large space.
http://www.air-n-water.com/product/L5600.html

Oh yes, I live in Indiana.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg front.jpg (55.6 KB, 72 views)
bens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2006, 10:06 PM   #2
boiler7904
Senior Member
 
boiler7904's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: NW IN
Posts: 3,072
Default Re: Heating options in barn

Up front price isn't going to be your problem. It will be the operating costs. With no insulation, any heat you create will disipate instantly. Electric heat for a space that big will be insanely expensive. You should really consider putting the insulation up first.

One other thing, money spent on building insulation qualifies you for a tax credit on your income taxes under the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Check with an accountant to make sure that your barn would qualify for this.

Last edited by boiler7904; 10-03-2006 at 10:11 PM.
boiler7904 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 10-04-2006, 07:28 AM   #3
bens
Member
 
bens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 56
Default Re: Heating options in barn

boiler,
I couldn't focus on your post because I was distracted by that ugly avatar of yours!!! .

Do you think an electric heater would make any difference if i just had it pointed over the workbench? Or would it dissipate so fast that I wouldn't even feel the heat? Even if I ran the heater outside, surely it would make some difference right?

I'm not looking to warm the entire barn for a weekend or anything, but would like to warm an area for a couple hours while working up there. I don't live on the property so I can't get up there nearly as much as I'd like.

Thanks for your help boiler!
Go Hoosiers!
bens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2006, 04:07 PM   #4
boiler7904
Senior Member
 
boiler7904's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: NW IN
Posts: 3,072
Default Re: Heating options in barn

It's hard to tell until you try it. Anything you could do to reduce the volume of space warmed by the heater would also help. Maybe hang a tarp from the ceiling to try to contain what heat you are able to create.

BTW, You have my condolences on being a Hoosier. I won't hold it against you.
boiler7904 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2006, 05:38 PM   #5
ranger_dood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,231
Default Re: Heating options in barn

Maybe an infrared system?
ranger_dood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2006, 09:53 AM   #6
desperado
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 2
Default Re: Heating options in barn

I would seriously look at a corn burner, and some insulation. Corn is CHEAP and produces more heat per pound than coal. I am heating my house with one and it'e the bomb. You are in the corn belt so finding corn will not be hard.
And they also have a corn boiler if your house is anywhere close the the building you could heat both with it. But before you do anything, go buy some plastic sheeting and vapor seal the walls and then get some insulation up. Duct board works good, it's a bit expensive at first glance, but nothing close to the amount it will take to heat a pole ban with the wind coming in all over, and plastic sheet seal the rafters at minimum, so you can get the het down where you are.
desperado is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2006, 10:31 AM   #7
astroracer
Senior Member
 
astroracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Mid_Michigan
Posts: 740
Default Re: Heating options in barn

For a couple of times a week this may be your best option. Cheap enough to operate and you can point them wherever you want...

A local tractor supply or tool store should have these things...
http://www.comfortchannel.com/level.itml/icOid/1882
There are some patio heaters listed on this site also. Maybe something like that would work for you???
Mark
__________________
My Fotki Album...
http://members.fotki.com/astroracer/about/
'31 Model A Tudor Sedan (it's own basket)
'73 Firebird. Pro Streeted due to rust but slated for a Pro_Touring makeover.
'88 Astro Van - The BAD AST project...
'94 Firebird Formula
'95 GMC Sierra - It has a few mods...
'00 Monte Carlo SS- The GOOD car...
'01 Astro Van - The "family trukster"...
(gone) '02 Collector Edition Trans Am (traded for the '56)
'56 Chevy Handyman Wagon
'04 Astro Van - The daily driver/go getter

Last edited by astroracer; 10-18-2006 at 10:34 AM.
astroracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2006, 01:28 PM   #8
Blue
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 462
Default Re: Heating options in barn

Those torpedo heaters are great for temporary heat. They are either kerosene or propane fueled.

For inside, I've heard the propane ones are better, becasue they give off less fumes. Pretty cheap too, you can get a nice one for a couple hundred bucks.
Blue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2006, 04:21 PM   #9
Fueler
Senior Member
 
Fueler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Urbana, IL
Posts: 646
Default Re: Heating options in barn

Having worked in a big ole Farm barn before, the salamander is your only choice. You just have to point it in the direction you are working.

I would not waste money on a real heating system until you add the insulation. I think however, that you are talking about some other building than what is shown in your post.

I have a 40x50 insulated morton building and use 2 of those tubular heaters. Work great. They get my vote over forced air every time.
Fueler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2006, 09:27 AM   #10
bens
Member
 
bens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 56
Default Re: Heating options in barn

Thanks for the comments. I'm going to look into the torpedo/salamander unit.

Fueler, the barn in my first post is the one refering to.
bens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2006, 12:27 PM   #11
HoosierBuddy
Senior Member
 
HoosierBuddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Southern Indiana
Posts: 1,143
Default Re: Heating options in barn

Quote:
Originally Posted by bens
Thanks for the comments. I'm going to look into the torpedo/salamander unit.

Fueler, the barn in my first post is the one refering to.
I used a torpedo unit for a few years in my barn. The downside with any unvented heater (like the torpedo heater) is the combustion byproducts get blown at you with the heat. If you are working in clean air, that's just some water and some CO2. If you're using any solvents, cleaners, paint, etc., you also get to enjoy whatever it breaks down to when it burns. Likely toxic and definitely obnoxious. They are also louder than all get out.

Electric heat's going to be a complete waste of time and money. You'll never get enough heat going to help and what you do create will make your meter spin faster than...well...something that spins fast, I guess (Can someone loan me a simile?)

I'm going to recommend a woodstove (vented of course) if you have access to firewood. A wood stove puts out some serious BTUs. If you have some superfulous trees around, than fuel is free. Around here, you can get slab wood from saw mills for next to nothing. And nothing builds a ripped torso better than splitting wood.

Boilerdude you should keep that in mind! Next time you're on campus you could attract some of those hot Purdue coeds....if you can find one.

(ha just kidding.)

Phil

Praying for a miracle AT Ohio State, Saturday.
HoosierBuddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2011, 05:31 PM   #12
buckeye guy
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1
Default Re: Heating options in barn

I think I know what you are talking about. I'm in much the same boat. I've used the kerosene torpedo heater, stinks. I don't want to pay for electric, too expensive. Wood burners are expensive and take too long to heat up and require watching while the fire gets going. I've insulated with syrofoam panels, easy to install but not the best r-value and I'm thinking about a propane ceiling tube heater. It seems like they might offer quick heat for a reasonable cost. But I guess I would have to buy or rent a tank to set outside. I'm hoping to find a used one. Anyone have any thoughts on that?
buckeye guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2011, 03:13 AM   #13
uneasysunday
Junior Member
 
uneasysunday's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 28
Default Re: Heating options in barn

wood stoves are not really expensive if you get one for next to nothing off craigslist (easily done) and find a cheap source of wood to burn or cut/split your own. You can even find trees that are down for free on craigslist that people just want off their property. If you know how to build a fire you dont really need to "tend to them" just light the thing and wait and stoke it and you will be getting some decent heat in no-time. Woodstoves will take the longest to heat up but for a barn it is the best option. with a little planning, a chainsaw and some networking you will be working in a nice toasty barn for next to nothing. and I'm guessing craigslist is within your capabilities since you asked this question on an internet forum. Oh yeah... just like everyone else has said, put up insulation
uneasysunday is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2011, 03:28 AM   #14
V-10 Killer
Senior Member
 
V-10 Killer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Midland, MI
Posts: 966
Default Re: Heating options in barn

Is there any chance you could frame in a "warm room" in your barn?
My dad put up a 40x60 with 14' ceilings and framed an insulated warm room off to the side that he heats from a slipstream of circulated hot water from his outdoor wood burner (If it's well insulated, you could use electric heat quite easily). And since it only has an 8' ceiling, he uses the loft for additional storage. That way you can still have lots of cold storage, and an area you can afford to heat easily and without too many fumes involved.
__________________
www.V10Killer.com
My Toybox Build

"Up until the 20th century, advancement of civilization was defined by the strongest among us.
Now, it appears its going to be defined by the weakest among us."
V-10 Killer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:26 AM.