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Old 08-14-2010, 10:41 AM   #1
ForceFed70
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Default Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

I'm in the planning process for building a 32' x 40' garage, but have run into a few questions about overhead doors.

I plan to have 12' high walls and was thinking of putting in a 16x8 overhead door and a 10x10 overhead door. Are these considered standard/common sizes? I'm a little flexible with the door size and want to pick a standard size door to save on costs and to have lots of styles, etc to choose from.

Was also thinking of installing a 16x10 door instead of 16x8. Don't think I really need it (especially with the other 10x10 door already there) but was thinking it might be worth it if it doesn't cost much more. Can anyone give me an idea for what the cost difference would be?

And finally, when framing for say a 10x10 door.. do I frame a 10x10 opening, or should it be slightly smaller?

Sorry for the long post. Questions summed up:
- Are 16x8 and 10x10 standard/common sizes?
- How much more expensive would a 16x10 door be vs a 16x8?
- What size should I frame the openings for?

Thanks!
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Old 08-14-2010, 10:54 AM   #2
timewarp
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

Actually the rough framing should be 1 1/2" taller and 3" wider than the opening, then you have the trim that fills that area up to make the opening come out to the size of the door, might be worth figuring out where you are getting your doors and they ussually have a diagram of how they would like the framing around the door.

Personally I'd go with the tallest doors that will fit, you never know what you might want to get in the garage in the future and it's alot more to make the opening bigger and replace a door than it is to just go bigger now.

Last edited by timewarp; 08-14-2010 at 10:57 AM.
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:03 PM   #3
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

I'd say your installed cost on a 16x8 2" Double sided steel will be in the area of 900-1200 depending on your area and the 10x10 with be 850-1100. 16x10 is going to run you approx 1200-1500. I own a garage door company and just recently installed 2-12x10 2" Double sided steel doors on my pole barn and my material cost was $1470 and obviously I installed myself.
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:41 PM   #4
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

For your opening it depends how you will trim out.

The final size should be the size of the door. If you are trimming out with aluminum sheet (common to do) then the rough opening will be the size of the door.

If you are trimming out with 3/4" boards, then 1.5" larger on the 2 sides and 3/4" larger on the top.

When you frame, run a normal jack and king stud, but also put another for a total of 3. That will give you extra room for the brackets, and it also doesn't hurt to help beef up the wall.

16x8 is a standard size as well as 18x8. 18ft is really about the widest I have seen without going to a commercial door.

Best thing do to is go to the lumber yard and see what they can get and what the price is. That is what I did for my shed. They carry 8x7 doors, anything else is special order (this is at Lowe's) so that's what I got.
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:46 PM   #5
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

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Originally Posted by ptalco View Post
I'd say your installed cost on a 16x8 2" Double sided steel will be in the area of 900-1200 depending on your area and the 10x10 with be 850-1100. 16x10 is going to run you approx 1200-1500. I own a garage door company and just recently installed 2-12x10 2" Double sided steel doors on my pole barn and my material cost was $1470 and obviously I installed myself.
Thanks ptalco! So I should expect to pay an extra 25% to step up to a 10' height. Is part of that for a "stronger" opener, or just the extra cost of the door and install?

Can you comment about standard sizing? Are 16x10 and 10x10 fairly standard sizes?

Also, would appreciate your input with rough framing size. Does 1.5" taller and 3" wider sound right to you?
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:47 PM   #6
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

Ive got an 18x9

It is considered a commercial door, simply due to the size.

This introduces a change in rough opening measurements. It is not dependent upon trim or jam.
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:49 PM   #7
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

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Originally Posted by nate379 View Post
For your opening it depends how you will trim out.

The final size should be the size of the door. If you are trimming out with aluminum sheet (common to do) then the rough opening will be the size of the door.

If you are trimming out with 3/4" boards, then 1.5" larger on the 2 sides and 3/4" larger on the top.

When you frame, run a normal jack and king stud, but also put another for a total of 3. That will give you extra room for the brackets, and it also doesn't hurt to help beef up the wall.

16x8 is a standard size as well as 18x8. 18ft is really about the widest I have seen without going to a commercial door.

Best thing do to is go to the lumber yard and see what they can get and what the price is. That is what I did for my shed. They carry 8x7 doors, anything else is special order (this is at Lowe's) so that's what I got.
Thanks Nate. That really was the the info I was looking for. So the final opening size after trim should be the same as the advertised size of the door. I think I will likely trim with 1x6 so 1.5" wider and 3/4" taller sounds like it would be right for me.
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:51 PM   #8
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

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This introduces a change in rough opening measurements. It is not dependent upon trim or jam.
Sorry, I'm not quite following you here. Could you elaborate?
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:52 PM   #9
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

Like I said, that is not normal unless you would trim out the door with 2x material.

What you want to trim the door out with is up to you.
Many people use aluminum/vinyl or 3/4" boards, but you can use whatever you want. The final opening will be the size of the door, so just account for what you use to trim and then make the opening work for that.

As far as a standard door, you need to go to the store and price the sizes and figure out if that extra height or width is worth it. There is really no "standard" door.
A 7ft door is most common and 8ft isn't hard to find. Anything over that you will have to pay extra for the height and also the opener will cost more as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ForceFed70 View Post

Also, would appreciate your input with rough framing size. Does 1.5" taller and 3" wider sound right to you?

Last edited by nate379; 08-14-2010 at 01:55 PM.
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:54 PM   #10
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

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Originally Posted by nate379 View Post
Like I said, that is not normal unless you would trim out the door with 2x material.

What you want to trim the door out with is up to you.
Many people use aluminum/vinyl or 3/4" boards, but you can use whatever you want. The final opening will be the size of the door, so just account for what you use to trim and then make the opening work for that.
Thanks Nate. I hadn't seen your reply when I typed that.
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Old 08-14-2010, 01:58 PM   #11
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

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Originally Posted by ForceFed70 View Post
Sorry, I'm not quite following you here. Could you elaborate?
Seem like Nate has one end of things (residential) covered.

but in a nutshell....

A sizing a residential door is 100% dependent upon your FINAL opening. This includes whatever jam you decide to use. And will effect your ROUGH opening.

Use some 1x4 or 1x6 for jam stock, and your rough opening will have to be 3/4 taller, and a 1-1/2 wider.

or, use some 2x4 or 2x6, and your rough opening will have to be 1-1/2 taller and 3" wider.

Clear as mud?


Now, commercial is MUCH easier. You want an 16x10 door? That is your rough opening. 16' wide, and 10' tall. Period.

What you add for jam is completely up to you, but it does not effect the operation of the door.

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Old 08-14-2010, 02:03 PM   #12
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

You could do the same on a residential door. Frame a 16x10 door at that and trim with 2x6s, it will work just fine as well. Just your opening won't be as large as it could be.

Back in the old days before decent weather sealing they would frame the final opening 2-3" smaller.
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Old 08-14-2010, 02:11 PM   #13
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

Here is some info for you.

http://www.doorson-line.com/

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Old 08-14-2010, 02:21 PM   #14
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

Yes force that is just for the material and labor increase the electric opener would be extra. 3/4HP 8ft rail will be around $370 and a 3/4HP 10ft rail will be around $440
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Old 08-14-2010, 02:52 PM   #15
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

Thanks guys! I think I've got a handle on it now.

1 last question: Trim with 2x6 or 1x6? I was going to do 1x6 just because it's creaper lumber.

dcovey - that link is very helpful. Especially this part: http://www.doorson-line.com/measuring-a-garage-door.php
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Old 08-14-2010, 03:51 PM   #16
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

Now that you have that figured out, make sure you check around on pricing.
Garage doors and blown in insulation are 2 things that you can usually hire done cheaper than you can do it yourself.
I did 2 9x7 garage doors this spring, cost me less installed than I would have paid for the doors at the big box store.
Insulation in my shop last fall, 24x30 16" deep would have cost me over $400 for materials to buy it, I had the 24x30 and 2 24x24 attics done by the pros for less than $500.
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Old 08-14-2010, 03:51 PM   #17
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

I wouldnt bother with any kind of lumber for trim. Unless you are paying out the nose for a-grade, AND get lucky enough to find real a-grade lumber, the trim will be toast in a matter of a few years. Depending upon the overall exposure to the elements, of course.

I always use a composite trim. Miratec, smart trim, etc.

Comes preprimed, straight and true, and remains that way.
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Old 08-14-2010, 04:09 PM   #18
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Default Re: Overhead door - standard sizing and framing

In this area (MA) we frame the rough to the door dimension...a 16x8 door would have a 16x8 rough. Then the opening would be reduced by the thickness of the trim. It could just be a traditional thing because this was the way it was done before the advent if the vinyl weatherstrip folks use around garage doors.

You certainly want to not only add a third stud next to your jack and king studs on either side but also face those studs with a piece of 1x4. not only does this provide a nice mounting surface for the track brackets but it also gives you a nice edge to run your walboard up against. Of course this requires your jamb material to be 3/4 deeper but it makes a nice detail.

The 3 studs would total to a thickness of 4 1/2 inches and the 1x4 would cover 3 1/2 inches of that leaving a 1 inch nailer for the wallboard.
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