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Old 09-01-2010, 02:45 PM   #1
652plus2
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Default Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

Hey guys,

I'm re-wiring my old garage - I added a 100amp subpanel and now I'm laying out all of the circuits. I want to run 4 dedicated 220 lines for my 6hp 80 gallon compressor, my electric oven for powdercoating, a mini-split hvac and a 220 mig welder. None of the runs will be more than 25' long. I know just enough about electricity to get myself in trouble. What size supply wire should I be using? The more I read, the more I think I should ask someone who knows. Can you help?
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Old 09-01-2010, 03:35 PM   #2
Charles (in GA)
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

Its 240 volt, not 220. You need to look on the data plates of each item and find out the amp draw of the equipment. The welder manual should tell you what to use on it.

Charles
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Old 09-01-2010, 04:00 PM   #3
Rosco
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

Charles is correct. I ran 10/3 for my compressor, 8/3 for my welder, 12/3 for future mini-split and 6/3 for a free standing stove. It will all depend on the current draw from the appliance or tool. I always run larger just in case and then breaker it down.
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Old 09-01-2010, 05:53 PM   #4
652plus2
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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Originally Posted by Charles (in GA) View Post
Its 240 volt, not 220.
Charles
See what I mean...I know just enough to get myself into trouble. 220, 221...whatever it takes.

Thanks so much for your help. Lets say I haven't chosen a welder yet, ('cause I haven't) but I want to run my wires while I have the walls open. I'm a hobbyist restorer working mainly with sheetmetal, but I want a to step up from a 110 welder. Is there a wire size that I will be safe with without knowing exactly what machine I'm buying and without going wild?
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:10 PM   #5
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

Thats why I ran 8/3. I Might not need the extra wire or guage but I do not want to pull it out in the future.........I will just match my breaker size to the welder.
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:15 PM   #6
sdowney717
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

I used 8/2 on the welder.
Craftsman AC arc welder with 3 prong plug is only 240 volt circuit.
Inspector approved!
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:46 PM   #7
Norcal
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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Originally Posted by sdowney717 View Post
I used 8/2 on the welder.
Craftsman AC arc welder with 3 prong plug is only 240 volt circuit.
Inspector approved!
That because a neutral is not needed & a waste of money for a 240V circuit.
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:48 PM   #8
sdowney717
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

sure would have been!
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Old 09-03-2010, 03:59 PM   #9
652plus2
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

Thanks for the help on this, guys. I don't post much, but I read here every day. This is a great forum.
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Old 09-03-2010, 05:40 PM   #10
gatchel
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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Originally Posted by 652plus2 View Post

220, 221...whatever it takes.
Great movie!
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Old 09-03-2010, 06:47 PM   #11
ForceFed70
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

Well, to run a kitchen oven you need a 40A circuit which means 8/3 wire.
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Old 09-03-2010, 07:21 PM   #12
Norcal
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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Well, to run a kitchen oven you need a 40A circuit which means 8/3 wire.
Depends on the oven, the nameplate tells all but how often is someone gonna install a oven in the shop? not unheard of but a rare thing.
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Old 09-03-2010, 07:34 PM   #13
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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Depends on the oven, the nameplate tells all but how often is someone gonna install a oven in the shop? not unheard of but a rare thing.
Well, he did mention electric oven for powdercoating in the original post.

Standard kitchen oven requires a 40A circuit. If he's using a specialty oven, then yeah... he'd need to know the reccomended circuit size.
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Old 09-03-2010, 09:53 PM   #14
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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Originally Posted by ForceFed70 View Post
Well, he did mention electric oven for powdercoating in the original post.

Standard kitchen oven requires a 40A circuit. If he's using a specialty oven, then yeah... he'd need to know the reccomended circuit size.
30A is not unheard of for a oven....
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Old 09-03-2010, 10:30 PM   #15
652plus2
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

Yeah, it's just a standard kitchen oven I bought for powdercoating, so I'll go with a 40A breaker and 8/3 wire. You can see some of the old set-up in my "pre-divorce garage" below. Now I'm trying to recreate that garage at my new residence. It probably sounds like I'm asking stupid questions, but I don't actually have my compressor, lift, oven, etc with me right now, so I can't just look to see what their requirements are. Everything was stashed in storage in another State when I moved out.

My new garage may be much smaller, but I'm far happier in it...trust me...



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Old 09-03-2010, 11:33 PM   #16
Norcal
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

A freestanding range will require a min of a 40A* circuit, plus it's required to be 4-wire as grounding the frame of a appliance to the neutral is not allowed in new installations anymore, (Since the adoption of the 1996 NEC).

*Nameplate rating will determine the required circuit.
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Old 09-04-2010, 12:24 AM   #17
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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A freestanding range will require a min of a 40A* circuit, plus it's required to be 4-wire as grounding the frame of a appliance to the neutral is not allowed in new installations anymore, (Since the adoption of the 1996 NEC).

*Nameplate rating will determine the required circuit.


1 post you are saying it's not unheard of to use a 30A circuit, the next you are saying it's 40A minimum. Yes, yes.. look at the nameplate rating. But let me assure you that you're not going to find a regular 30" kitchen oven that requires larger than a 40A circuit. Nobody builds them because nobody has the wiring in their kitchen.

The OP already said that he'll use 8/3 wire.

Last edited by ForceFed70; 09-04-2010 at 12:37 AM.
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Old 09-04-2010, 08:58 AM   #18
Norcal
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

ForceFed70: A oven and a range are 2 different things...........
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Old 09-04-2010, 11:09 AM   #19
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

I just read your post and I can comment on what I know. I have helped out an electrician for some extra work the last years. I put in 6/3 wire for my welder. If I were you I would buy a roll of 6/3 and use it for you welder and oven. The new ranges are almost all 50amp. You can always use a smaller 40amp plug with 6/3 wire. The compressor can be 10/2. I can't speak to your split hvac, but if you have enough 6 wire I would use that. Just remember when you go to install all these items that you use the correct breaker size for each item, this way your wire is protected.
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Old 09-05-2010, 01:19 PM   #20
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Default Re: Supply Wire Size for 220 circuits

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Originally Posted by 652plus2 View Post
My new garage may be much smaller, but I'm far happier in it...trust me...
my garage space grew by leaps and bounds when I got divorced.
I was much much happier.

I used to not have a clue with automotive electrical. I met a girl that crawled into the engine bay of my CJ8 and showed me how to use a multimeter. about 12 years latter she became wife2.0......
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